CSS Research and Policy Seminar with James D. Boys

By Zoltan Feher

On October 27, 2020, James D. Boys was the guest speaker at the Research & Policy Seminar of the Center for Strategic Studies. Boys presented his paper “The Madman Theory: Intellectual and Cultural Origins,” which constitutes the third chapter in his anticipated ten-chapter book detailing the development of The Madman Theory and its implementation by Presidents Nixon and Trump.

Read more

CSS Post-Doctoral Fellow Aroop Mukharji has been chosen as one of 6 “New Faces in international security” by the Triangle Institute of Security Studies at Duke

Since 2000, the Triangle Institute for Security Studies (TISS) has hosted an annual two-day conference called the “Junior and Interdisciplinary Faces of International Security.” The purpose of the “New Faces” project, as it has come to be known, is to strengthen the rising cohort of scholars specializing in security studies.

Read more

Americans living overseas could tilt the 2020 election – if only they voted

By Monica Duffy Toft

Just under 5 million U.S. citizens live abroad, serving in the military and embassies or just living in another country. As a political scientist who studies demographics and politics, I have observed how different voting blocs, even small ones, can affect the outcome of elections. Three million people is more than enough people to decide a presidential or congressional race with narrow margins.

Read more

THE CENTRAL AMERICAN CONUNDRUM: TOWARD A NEW REGIONAL SECURITY AND ECONOMIC ORDER

By Aroop Mukharji

For over a hundred years, the United States has struggled to find a policy toward Central America that improves its economic prosperity and security. The region’s challenges today are many: weak and failed states, drug and human trafficking cartels, and an exploding migration and humanitarian crisis. Why has U.S. foreign policy toward Central America failed, and failed badly?

Read more

Ending Our Military-First Foreign Policy

By Monica Duffy Toft

Beyond our two big overseas commitments—Iraq and Afghanistan—military operations have by and large been increasingly opaque. Much has been done with drones and special operations forces. Along with this, U.S. diplomatic efforts and resources have dramatically receded into the background. We need to face the fact that the United States has become a hyper-interventionist and unilateral power. More bluntly, it has become a bully in the international arena.

Read more

Starvation as Siege Tactics: Urban Warfare in Syria

by Nils Hagerdal

Famine is on the rise across conflict zones worldwide. Yet in Syria – unlike other contemporary wars – the phenomenon is concentrated in urban areas, and intensified significantly after 2015. To explain these outcomes I delve into the nature of urban warfare. Urban combat operations favor the defender, and many military organizations resort to siege warfare to conquer urban territory; starvation remains a powerful siege tactic.

Read more

Karim Elkady for Oxford Research Encyclopedias: US-Egypt Relations

Since the 1830s, Egyptian regimes sought US government support to assist Egypt in gaining its independence and enable it to act freely in the region. Since 1974, the Egyptian–US strategic partnership emerged, especially after the Camp David Accords, to protect the region from the Soviet Union, the Islamic Republic of Iran, and Iraq under Saddam Hussein, and then to contain the rise of terrorism.

Read more