Covid-19 Does Not Discriminate

By Lima Ahmad

It is possible this crisis will increase distrust and fear of the unknown, further dividing us, causing an increase in global inequality due to restrictions on labor migration, trade, and economic dependency. Yet at the same time the coronavirus crisis is an opportunity for us to rethink our humanity and reimagine our world during this time of collective vulnerability.

Read more

The Other Side of the Sanctions Equation

By Bryan Cassella

Our understanding of the effectiveness of sanctions regimes, which were once seen as simple and straight-forward strategies to apply pressure on target states, has evolved with the successes and failures of past attempts. Research on the factors that contribute to the success of sanctions is still relatively new, and it remains unclear how the characteristics of the target state affect the results.

Read more

CSS Research and Policy Seminar with Thomas Cavanna

Thomas Cavanna, visiting assistant professor at The Fletcher School, presented an early version of a new paper on Europe’s position within the global U.S.-China competition for influence at the CSS Research and Policy Seminar on December 10, 2019. The paper is part of Cavanna’s ongoing region-by-region study of the Belt and Road Initiative and its impact on U.S. grand strategy.

Read more

The Case against Regime Change in Iran

Regime change in Iran is unattractive for at least three major reasons: the poor track record of the policy in general, the difficulty of finding suitable candidates to run a different kind of regime, and the simple fact that the central tenets of Iranian foreign policy actually predate the Islamic regime and may well persist even with new leaders and a changed form of government.

Read more

The More Things Change, the More They Stay the Same: The Failure of Regime‐​Change Operations

Whether trying to achieve political, security, economic, or humanitarian goals, scholars have found that regime-change missions do not succeed as envisioned. Instead, they are likely to spark civil wars, lead to lower levels of democracy, increase repression, and in the end, draw the foreign intervener into lengthy nation-building projects.

Read more

America’s Withdrawal From Syria: Politics of Betrayal in Historical Context

The fact of the matter is the United States has made analogous military withdrawals in comparaable circumstances before when it intervened in areas peripheral to its national interests, such as Syria. In such circumstances, America’s intervention does not serve a clear vital interest and less costly policy options might exist that could still protect America’s peripheral interests without risking long-term attachment to a specific area.

Read more

CSS Research and Policy Seminar with Jon Caverley

ow is it possible that the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter can be almost universally reviled within the United States as a programmatic disaster, and yet has never lost a competitive tender abroad and continues to attract considerable demand from foreign air forces? The answer, he suggests, lies with the unique abilities of the United States to develop and control cutting-edge military technologies.

Read more