Courses

The following courses are taught in the Fall 2018:

DHP P263: CIVIL WARS: THEORY AND POLICY

Monica Duffy Toft

This course introduces students to the analytical and comparative study of large-scale, organized violence within states. Historical and contemporary civil wars will be analyzed from a variety of perspectives, and prominent cases such as former Yugoslavia and contemporary Afghanistan, Iraq, Libya, Sudan and Syria will be discussed. The course will address the role of resources, grievances, religion, nationalism, interstate dimensions (including refugee flows and repatriation), external intervention, and conflict resolution. The course aims to provide students with solid theoretical and historical foundations, and to highlight the difficult policy dilemmas associated with civil wars. By the end of the course, students will be well prepared to think through policy options in the prevention and resolution of civil wars. Enrollment is open, and there are no prerequisites.

DHP P210: RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODOLOGY

Monica Duffy Toft

This course covers the basics of research design and methods in political science. The first part of the course is devoted to developing a research question, constructing testable theories, understanding the advantages of quantitative and qualitative methods, and concept formation. The second part of the course focuses on specific research methods (historical analysis, statistical methods, field research, archival research, and experiments) and their relative strengths and weaknesses. The final section of the course addresses the ways in which scholars combine different methods to study political phenomena. Open to PhD students only or with permission of instructor.

DHP D261: AFGHANISTAN AND THE U.S. “WAR OF NECESSITY”

Thomas Cavanna

Despite a seemingly brilliant victory in the early days of the post-9/11 era, America’s campaign in Afghanistan has become the longest war in US history, with currently no end in sight. Balancing history, theory, and policy this seminar investigates the mechanisms and critical junctures that led to this entanglement. It explores the collision between the US-led coalition’s objectives, the lasting legacies of the Cold War and the specificities of Afghanistan’ society and regional dynamics. All along, we examine critical junctures, successes, failures, and ambiguities in light of scholarly disputes and policy debates. Themes addressed include the war on terror, South Asia’s geopolitics, democratization, state-building, insurgencies, and strategy.