Category Archives: Library

Notes from the Library…Introducing JumboSearch

In June, Tufts Libraries launched a new iteration of our search platform, JumboSearch.  This means that the way you search for resources (books, journals, databases, articles, etc.) available through our libraries has changed.  This new search platform is part of our transition to a new integrated library system, which will improve how we manage our resources.

Here is a brief primer on how to use JumboSearch to find the resources you need.

How do I access JumboSearch?

The search box at the center of the Hirsh Health Sciences Library homepage (https://hirshlibrary.tufts.edu/) is for JumboSearch.

How do I find a book in JumboSearch?

Enter a title, author or keyword in the search box at the center of the Hirsh Health Sciences Library homepage.  Use the filters on the left side of the results page to limit your search to books.  Once you find the book that you need, click the title to view additional information, such as location and availability, and, if it is available electronically, access the full text.

What if the book I want is located at another Tufts library?

If the book is located at another Tufts library, then click the title of the book on the JumboSearch results page.  Select the ‘Log in’ link in the yellow bar at the center of the page.  Once you have signed in with your Tufts username and password, click the ‘Request item’ link to request delivery of the book to the Hirsh Health Sciences Library.  You will receive email notification when the book is ready for you to pick up at our Library Service Desk.

How do I find a journal? 

Enter the title of a journal in the JumboSearch box at the center of the Hirsh Health Sciences Library homepage.  If the journal is available through our libraries, then the title should appear at the top of the results.  Click the title of the journal to view print and electronic availability.

Another (and I find more efficient) method of finding a journal is to click the ‘Journals’ tab at the top of any JumboSearch page, which brings you to a page where you can search or browse our Journal list (versus all of our resources).

Can I use JumboSearch to find the full text of an article?

Yes!  If you have the title of a journal article and want to know whether or not the full text is available through Tufts, then copy and paste the title into JumboSearch.  If necessary, use the filters on the left side of the results page to narrow your results.  Once you find your article, click the ‘Full text available’ link.

How do I access my library account?

Use the ‘Log in’ link in the upper right-hand corner of any JumboSearch page, or in the yellow bar at the center of an item details page.  In your library account, you can see the items that you currently have checked out (including interlibrary loan books), requests, fines and blocks, as well as renew Tufts Libraries’ books.

Library Roundup: A Review of Helpful Links, Tips, & Resources

Every month, librarian Laura Pavlech from the Hirsch Health Sciences Library helpfully provides us with invaluable tips and reminders about resources that are available to the graduate student population to help with their research and other academic needs. 

In appreciation for all of her hard work this past year, here is a look back at what she assembled for our use:

NOTES FROM THE LIBRARY

PUBMED TIP OF THE MONTH

Thanks again to Laura for assembling these wonderful aids!

 

Library Events: September & October

Stress Less, Learn More

Wed September 20th || 3-4 PM, Sackler 510

Register to attend in person  /  Register to attend via WebEx

 

Introduction to Citation Management

Tues September 26th || 9-10 AM, Sackler 510

Register to attend in person  /  Register to attend via WebEx

Wed September 27th || 3-4 PM, Sackler 510

Register to attend in person  /  Register to attend via WebEx

 

Show the Impact of Your Research

Tues October 3rd || 9-10 AM, Sackler 510

Register to attend in person  /  Register to attend via WebEx

Wed October 4th || 3-4 PM, Sackler 510

Register to attend in person  /  Register to attend via WebEx

Notes from the Library…Choosing Where to Publish

Where you publish can be as important as what you publish.  Consider the following when choosing a journal to which to submit your article:

Quality

  • How does the journal rank according to impact factor and other journal metrics?
  • Who is on the editorial board of the journal?
  • Can you easily identify and contact the journal’s publisher?
  • Is the journal’s peer review process explicit?
  • Is the journal or publisher a member of a recognized industry initiative?
  • What opinion do your colleagues and mentors have of the journal?

Relevance

  • Does the journal publish research that is relevant to your work?
  • Does the journal publish the type of article that you want to write?
  • Who reads the journal?  Is this the audience that you want to read your work?

Discoverability

  • Is the journal indexed by major databases, such as PubMed, Web of Science, or other discipline-specific databases?  This information can be found on the journal’s website or Ulrichsweb (see below).
  • Does the journal offer extra services, such as graphical abstracts, videos or social media promotion?

Public and Open Access

  • Do you wish to publish in an open access journal, or a journal that has an open access option?  If so, what are the associated article processing charges (APCs)?
  • Does your article need to comply with a funder’s public access policy?
  • Does the journal allow self-archiving a version of the article on a personal website or institutional repository?  Is there an embargo period?

Finding Journal Metrics

For an explanation of the metrics mentioned below, see ‘How is Journal Impact Measured?’ in our Measuring Research Impact guide: http://researchguides.library.tufts.edu/researchimpact.

  • Journal Citation Reports: Journal Citation Reports provides Impact Factors, Eigenfactors and Article Influence Scores for science and social science journals.
  • Scopus: Scopus provides CiteScore, SCImago Journal Rank (SJR) and Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP) for journals and book series. These metrics are also freely available at Journal Metrics.

Other Resources for Evaluating Journals

Predatory, or illegitimate, publishers and journals have proliferated in recent years.  These journals collect article processing charges (APCs) without providing publisher services, such as peer review, editing, and long-term preservation and access, in return (note that many legitimate publishers and journals have APCs for open access).  While it can be difficult to determine whether or not a journal is predatory, the questions above and the resources listed below can help you distinguish a predatory journal from one that is not.  In addition, you can look at the potential characteristics of predatory journals identified in a recent cross-sectional study of biomedical journals.1

  • Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE): COPE provides advice to editors and publishers on all aspects of publication ethics, in particular how to handle research and publication misconduct. COPE members are expected to follow a code of conduct for journal editors. Search ‘Member’ page for journal or publisher.
  • Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ): Directory of peer-reviewed open access journals. Journals must apply to be included in this directory. Journals that adhere to an exceptionally high level of publishing standards are awarded the DOAJ Seal.
  • NLM Catalog: Search the National Library of Medicine Catalog (NLM) to discover which journals are indexed in PubMed/MEDLINE and other National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) databases.
  • Open Access Scholarly Publishers Association (OASPA): OASPA develops business models, tools and standards for open access publishers. Publishers must apply for membership to this organization, and are expected to adhere to set criteria. View ‘Member’ page for complete membership list.
  • Ulrichsweb: Ulrichsweb™ is an authoritative source of bibliographic and publisher information on more than 300,000 periodicals of all types–academic and scholarly journals, Open Access publications, peer-reviewed titles, popular magazines, newspapers, newsletters, and more from around the world.

Match Your Manuscript to a Journal

If you are having trouble finding a journal for your manuscript, then try a manuscript matcher.  These tools recommend journals based on your manuscript’s title, abstract or keywords.

  • EndNote Manuscript Matcher: Manuscript matcher, a feature in EndNote online, uses Web of Science data to suggest journals based on the title, abstract and references of your article. Anyone can create an online EndNote account, which can be synced with the desktop version of EndNote. Once you sign in to your online account, look for ‘Match’ in the menu at the top.
  • Journal/Author Name Estimator (JANE): JANE compares the title and/or abstract of your article to MEDLINE records to find journals that are the best match for your article.
  • JournalGuide: Free tool that helps researchers evaluate journals. Paper Match feature offers journal recommendations based on your manuscript’s title, abstract and/or keywords. Informational page for each journal lists its aims and scope, Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP), acceptance rate, submission and publication charges, when available, responsiveness and speed of publication. ‘Verified’ journals have been verified by third party indexes as recognized, reputable journals in their field.

1Shamseer L, Moher D, Maduekwe O, Turner L, Barbour V, Burch R, Clark J, Galipeau J, Roberts J, Shea BJ. Potential predatory and legitimate biomedical journals: can you tell the difference? A cross-sectional comparison. BMC Med. 2017;15(1):28; PMID: 28298236.

 

On the Shelf…

For Work

 Writing for Biomedical Publication

Writing for Biomedical Publication, David C. Morrison, Christopher J. Papasian, Stephen W. Russell

Location: HHSL Book Stacks, Sackler 5, WZ 345 M878w 2012

This workbook lays out how to think about and write each section of a biomedical manuscript, and how to approach issues such as co-authorship, editors, reviewers and conflict of interest.

For Leisure

The Trespasser

The Trespasser, Tana French

Location: HHSL Leisure Reading, Sackler 4, Fiction F873t 2016

Summer is just around the corner, so why not pick up a good mystery?  Tana French’s thoughtful mysteries provide an intimate portrait of life in and around modern-day Dublin, Ireland.  This is the latest in her Dublin Murder Squad series; while there are recurring characters in this series, it is not necessary to have read the earlier books (although they are all good!)

PubMed Tip of the Month…Search or Filter by Funder

Funding information is recorded in two fields in a PubMed record: Grant Number and Publication Type. Limiting a search to these fields can help you find articles that were supported by a specific grant, funder or type of funder (e.g. non-U.S. government).

  • Grant Number: The Grant Number field records grant or contract numbers as published in the article, or derived from PubMed Central as a result of the NIH Public Access Policy. To find articles funded by a particular organization, search the Grant Number field for the organization’s name, acronym or 2-letter code (click on link above for complete list funding agency names, acronyms and codes). For example, to find studies supported by the National Institute on Aging, search PubMed for: AA[gr].
  • Publication Type: Medical Subject Headings (MeSH), the standardized terms used to describe articles for MEDLINE, include Publication Types to identify financial support when that support is mentioned in the article. A list of publication types, including those for Research Support, can be viewed from the link above. To filter a search by one of the funding Publication Types: in the left-hand column of a results page, click ‘Customize’ under Article types. Scroll down and check the box next to the types of Research Support you would like to view. Click ‘Show’. The types of research support that you selected should now be visible under Article types. Click the research support type to filter your results.

Notes from the Library…Finding Funding & Writing Grant Proposals

Finding funding and writing grant proposals is a necessary, time-consuming, and at times frustrating, part of doing research. Our ‘Finding Funding & Writing Grant Proposals’ guide lists resources available at Tufts and beyond for locating funding opportunities, discovering projects that have been funded, and writing grant proposals. The full guide can be viewed at: http://researchguides.library.tufts.edu/findfunding. Here are a few highlights from this guide:

Finding Funding

  • COS Pivot: Comprehensive database of national and international funding opportunities from government and private funders. Advanced search features allow you to restrict your search to a particular funder, funding type or applicant type (e.g. graduate student). Profiles section may help you identify potential collaborators within or outside of Tufts. Use your Tufts email address to create an account, which will allow you to build a profile, view potential funding matches, save searches and schedule funding alerts.  Log in with Tufts username and password for off campus access.
  • Graduate & Postdoctoral Extramural Support (GRAPES): Compiled by the University of California at Los Angeles, GRAPES is a database of scholarship, grant, award, and fellowship opportunities for graduate students and postdocs.

Discovering Funded Projects

  • National Institutes of Health RePORTER: Research Portfolio Online Reporting Tool Expenditures and Results (RePORTER) is a searchable database of research projects funded by the NIH as well as the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), and Department of Veterans Affairs (VA).
  • National Science Foundation (NSF) Award Search: Complete data on active and expired NSF awards from 1976 to present; some information available for pre-1976 awards.

Books on Writing Grant Proposals

  • The Grant Application Writer’s Workbook: This popular workbook guides applicants through a NIH grant application, providing examples of each component of the application. Updated to reflect recent changes to application requirements.
  • Guide to Effective Grant Writing: How to Write a Successful NIH Grant Proposal: Covering all aspects of the proposal process, from the most basic questions about form and style to the task of seeking funding, this book offers clear advice backed up with excellent examples. Based on the author’s experience serving on NIH grant review panels, it covers the common mistakes and problems he witnessed while reviewing grants.
  • Writing the NIH Grant Proposal: Hands-on advice that simplifies and demystifies writing a NIH grant proposal.

On the Shelf…The New York Times

The New York Times

Tisch Library in Medford recently subscribed to The New York Times academic pass program. This means that Tufts students, faculty and staff can register for a personal account to access The New York Times from their computer or mobile device, on and off campus. For instructions on creating a personal account using the Tufts academic pass and answers to FAQ about our access, see this page: http://researchguides.library.tufts.edu/nytimes.   Note: When creating an account, be sure to choose the correct link based on your location when registering (i.e. on or off campus).

On the Shelf…

For Work

Effective Data Visualization

Effective Data Visualization: The Right Chart for the Right Data, by Stephanie D.H. Evergreen

Location: HHSL Book Stacks, Sackler 5, P 93.5 E937 2017

This book shows you how to select the best type of chart for your data, design an easily readable chart, and create effective charts and graphs in Excel.

For Leisure

The Undoing Project

The Undoing Project, Michael Lewis

Location: HHSL Book Stacks, Sackler 5, WL 103.4 L675 2017

Michael Lewis, the author of The Blind Side and The Big Short, describes the working relationship between two psychologists, Daniel Kahneman (author of Thinking Fast and Slow) and Amos Tversky, whose work changed how we think about decision making, and catalyzed the creation of the field of behavioral economics.

PubMed Tip of the Month…Topic-Specific Queries

Topic-specific queries in PubMed are carefully constructed search strategies that can either be applied to a set of results as a filter or added to a search using ‘AND’.  Each of these searches has been created by an expert, tested to optimize sensitivity and specificity, and is periodically updated.  To view a complete list of the available searches, click the ‘Topic-Specific Queries’ link under PubMed Tools on the PubMed homepage.  This will bring you to the Directory of Topic-Specific PubMed Queries, where you can view the available subject searches, which include: AIDS, bioethics, cancer, health disparities, toxicology and veterinary medicine.  Clicking the link for a subject either limits your PubMed search to that subject area (i.e. applies a filter) or brings you to a page with the search strategy and additional resources.

Topic-Specific Queries
Topic-Specific Queries link on PubMed homepage.

Some of the searches can also be applied as filters from a search results page.  To do so, click the ‘Show additional filters’ link in the left-hand column of a PubMed search results page.  Check the box next to Subjects and click the Show button.  Select a link under Subjects to narrow your results.  If you do not see a particular filter, then click the ‘Customize’ link under Subjects to choose additional filters.  I don’t use topic-specific queries too often, but they can save you a lot of work if an appropriate search filter has been constructed for your topic.