Supporting the Financial Health of Refugees: The Finance in Displacement (FIND) Study in Uganda and Mexico

By Karen Jacobsen and Kim Wilson One of the biggest challenges facing refugees and migrants is navigating the livelihoods and

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Navigating ‘Survivelihood’: Why refugees in Jordan plateau in their financial journeys too soon

By Swati Mehta Dhawan, Hans-Martin Zademach, and Kim Wilson This essay brings together early insights from the research conducted under

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The Humanitarian Ecosystem: Examining the Role of Migrant Assistance in Quito, Ecuador

By Dani Douglas, under the supervision of Kim Wilson A team of researchers from The Fletcher School of Law and

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“There’s (Not) an App for That”: Taking a Hard Look at the “App-ification” of Migration and the “Need” for New Technologies

By Madison Chapman, under the supervision of Kim Wilson Practitioners, advocates and writers often underscore the link between migration and

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A Shared Universe (for Most): Ecosystems in Public Spaces and Migrant Livelihoods

By Madison Chapman, under the supervision of Kim Wilson Two young Colombian women sit next to a small iron pushcart

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Researching Haitian Migrants as a Haitian Researcher

By Tania Smith, under the supervision of Kim Wilson. By the time I received approval to research the integration strategies of Haitian migrants living in Tijuana, they had already been covered extensively by the media. As a Haitian–American who was raised in Haiti, I knew that I would be able to process and understand nuances that other researchers and journalists could not. I am a fluent French and Haitian Creole speaker with innate knowledge of Haitian culture. My expectations for myself were high. I assumed that I would arrive in Tijuana and immediately be able to fit in and connect with the migrants. I assumed that because I was a “compatriot,” Haitians would be ready and willing to interview with me and I would be welcomed into their community with open arms. I was wrong.

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Putting Pieces in Place

By Ella Duncan, under the supervision of Kim Wilson. New arrivals to America must navigate ongoing identification of what American norms are and make decisions about which norms to embrace, which to merge into previously held norms, and which to discard as a poor fit. Financial norms hold a special place of importance. Deciding how to manage finances in America is directly related to the ability to provide for the well-being of oneself, one’s family, and one’s community. In a series of interviews in the fall of 2019, three Burundian immigrants in southern Maine shared their creative approaches to managing American finances.

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What Lies Ahead? Navigating New Insecurities in Displacement

By Catherine Wanjala, under the supervision of Kim Wilson.
Uganda’s 1.4 million refugees have trekked into the country, fleeing violence and conflict in South Sudan, Democratic Republic of Congo, Burundi, Somalia, and other regional neighbors. They came to Uganda sometimes intentionally, sometimes merely following the crowd, but all looking for peace. Through in-depth interviews with 30 refugees in Kampala in August 2019, we found that many urban refugees have found only partial peace, continuing to confront insecurity in displacement. Their experiences and fears of violence are limiting their livelihoods opportunities, their interest in integration, and even their willingness to send their children to school.

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