Museum Studies at Tufts University

Exploring ideas and engaging in conversation

Tag: technology (page 2 of 3)

Davis Art Museum @ Wellesley College: New Gallery App

Wellesley alum Hannah Heller, who’s now an MA candidate in Museum Education at Tufts, sent us this great video about the development of the new app for the Wellesley College art museum. It looks like an interestingly interactive model, prompting visitors to really engage with objects on a thoughtful, emotional level.

Experimonth

Margaret Aiken, Program Developer, Lifelong Learning at the Science Museum of Minnesota and M.A. Museum Education (G’10), invites museum studies students to get involved in Experimonth, a month-long blogging experiment that brings an artist, a scientist, and citizens together to use data and observation to make meaning. Experimonth is a program that was created at the Museum of Life & Science in Durham, NC. Margaret writes, “We are partnering with them to do Experimonth: Identity on our museum’s blogging platform called Science Buzz. The Museum of Life & Science is running a concurrent program called Experimonth: Race on Facebook. Both museums chose these themes to coincide with exhibits that are on the floor. As part of a grant from IMLS we will be comparing the comments, participation, and interactions on the two platforms, Science Buzz and Facebook. Please have a look at www.sciencebuzz.org/experimonth.”

The New Media Consortium Horizon Report

The New Media Consortium, which produces the Horizon Report, is compiling information for its 2011 Museum Edition.

If you’re not familiar with the report, you should be! The Horizon Report is a good, succinct overview of emerging technologies in various fields. They categorize innovations by their “horizon” – how soon it will be before a particular technology will become the next hot topic. Their predictions aren’t always 100% accurate, but they are always thoughtful explorations of how technology will impact our work.

Go, read the 2010 and other reports. They’re a good, well-organized, informative read.

Ed Rodley at the Boston Museum of Science and Thinking About Exhibits is part of the New Media Consortium Advisory Board for their museum report this year, and he wants to get the word out about how museum folk everywhere can help.

As part of the final information-gathering, they’re looking for innovative examples of technologies in museums for inclusion in the report.  See the note below and let them (or me) know of any cool examples you’ve encountered.

So go, check out his post, and find out how you can share what you’ve been learning and thinking about in the ways museums are using technology.

Museum Tech Meetup in Cambridge

Heads up, everyone. On Wednesday, September 21, there will be a museum tech meetup at the Cambridge Brewing Company in Kendall Square.

Organized by Ed Rodley, exhibit designer extraordinaire at the Boston Museum of Science, these have been held regularly for a few months now, and the reports are very good. Several Tufts students are already planning to attend.

Hope to see you there! More details can be found here.

Stories Behind the Paintings at the Sukiennice Museum

Krakow’s newly renovated Sukiennice Museum of 19th-century Polish art has a splashy video showing off the interactive campaign they did to publicize their 2010 reopening. In an attempt to make the art “come to life,” they recorded audio and video recreations of stories behind the artists, subjects, or patrons or a few of their most important paintings. One part of the project involved augmented reality, where visitors could view the video and painting at the same time through a smartphone app.

From this clip, it looks like the project was more about attention-getting marketing than an interpretation strategy. It’s no substitute for close observation of the paintings themselves, but it would be interesting to hear audience feedback about whether discovering the stories behind these few paintings piqued their curiosity in looking more closely at other work in the museum. Better to be drawn in by bells and whistles than not go to a museum at all?

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