Author Archives: Julia B. Mertens

Human Interaction Lab Data Session: April 25th, 2019, 2pm-4pm

The Human Interaction Laboratory Data session will meet on Thursday, March 28th 2019 in unit 2614, 200 Boston Ave. Medford, MA 02155.

If you don’t know what a data session is, you can read Saul’s description of learning about Conversation Analytic data sessions, or have a look at this resource from Arizona State University that discusses language and social interaction data analysis sessions from a variety of methodological/disciplinary perspectives: https://www.learninghowtolookandlisten.com.

See our full list of data sessions on our events page.

RSVP: julia.mertens@tufts.edu

Data: Dr. Kristen Bottema-Beutel and Dr. Gabrielle Oliviera from Boston College will be presenting data on Question-Response-Evaluation (QRE) sequences in the home interactions of a bilingual child with Autism Spectrum Disorder. We will focus on QRE sequences within interactions between a 5-year old bilingual child with ASD and his parents. In these sequences, the adult poses known-answer questions, the child responds, and the adult evaluates the response. QRE sequences are primarily structured by the questioner (i.e., the parents in our context), so we will focus on the interactive work done by parents to initiate, maintain, and close these sequences. 

Keep in touch:

If you’d like information about upcoming data sessions and announcements at the Human Interaction Lab, please subscribe to our mailing list.

Human Interaction Lab Data Session: March 28th, 2019

The Human Interaction Laboratory Data session will meet on Thursday, March 28th 2019 in unit 2580, 200 Boston Ave. Medford, MA 02155.

If you don’t know what a data session is, you can read Saul’s description of learning about Conversation Analytic data sessions, or have a look at this new resource from Arizona State University that discusses language and social interaction data analysis sessions from a variety of methodological/disciplinary perspectives: https://www.learninghowtolookandlisten.com.

See our full list of data sessions on our events page.

RSVP: saul.albert@tufts.edu / 857-222-5992

Data: Our next data session will be lead by Dr. Chris Pudlinski. The data is from a collection of peer support warm lines calls. The current research interest is moments of extended silence within these calls. There are four different environments in which multiple longer silences occur: difficult/emotional topics; caller reluctance to share “bad” news; call taker as “active” listener; and call taker as “inattentive” listener. The audio data is of “inattentive” listening. This is the most problematic of these environments, one in which extended conspicuous lapses occur where call taker response is clearly expected.

Keep in touch:

If you’d like information about upcoming data sessions and announcements at the Human Interaction Lab, please subscribe to our mailing list.

Human Interaction Lab Data Session: Thursday 31st January 2019

The Human Interaction Laboratory Data Session will meet on Thursday, January 31st 2019 from 3 – 5 PM in unit 2580, 200 Boston Ave. Medford, MA 02155.

If you don’t know what a data session is, you can read Saul’s description of learning about Conversation Analytic data sessions, or have a look at this new resource from Arizona State University that discusses language and social interaction data analysis sessions from a variety of methodological/disciplinary perspectives: https://www.learninghowtolookandlisten.com.

See our full list of data sessions on our events page.

RSVP: julia.mertens@tufts.edu

Data: In this session, Bryanna Hebenstreit (PhD Candidate at the University at Albany, SUNY) will present data set at a Habitat for Humanity build in Upstate NY. We will be analyzing a short clip showing how a volunteer gets the floor and demonstrates a technique that is presented as new for the onlookers. His demonstration is specifically targeted for the supervisor but ends up becoming a resource for all onlookers. We’ll explore how interactants ‘take over’ the main interaction and build their own talk, gestures, and embodied comportments to showcase an action to be seen by a particular interactant. Data in American English.

Keep in touch:

If you’d like information about upcoming data sessions and announcements at the Human Interaction Lab, please subscribe to our mailing list.