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Part 3 of Unwrapping Building 574 is Available!

Part 3 of Unwrapping Building 574 is now available! Part 3, entitled Adaptation, talks about the difficulties and nuances of adapting such an old, historic building into a modern, sustainable office. The section also includes some pictures of the building and concludes our series. We hope you’ve enjoyed it!

Read the blog here!

Unwrapping Building 574- Part 3: Adaptation

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Not even the interior and exterior details were ignored on the 574 project. The appliances and plumbing will feature energy and water efficient features, and the exterior will feature colored metal paneling for a contemporary look. Carpet, concrete, wood, and a large quantity of supply materials will be recycled goods. All of these elements make for a unique designed, energy aware building.

When I asked about the difficulties of creating such a project, both Santangelo and Kadish were unfazed. “Certainly in such a building, you’re going to have particular issues you don’t know until you work on the building. For instance, we found a 150 by 16 foot storage tank that we had to deal with under a slab, and we don’t know where it came from.” The age of the building though, they assured, was what made the design unique. “Usually we work on the envelope, core, and exterior separately,” Santangelo said “With this building however, the projects have to blend together to address the concerns of the project and incorporate such new parts. This allows us to adapt though, and we even have the ability to include new efficiency concepts rather than go back afterwards and replace something.”

The building, which both assuredly believe will be impressive upon completion, is a great entrance marker for the Tufts campus. With its new design and features, its hopes to showcase the sustainable initiative inherent in the university, and play a new role in the campus’ prestigious legacy.

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Part 2 of “Unwrapping Building 574″ is Here!

Our ongoing coverage of building 574 continues with Part 2- Stormwater. The interview details some fascinating mechanics of the building design, including how water and runoff is handled. Read it here!

Unwrapping Building 574, Part 2: Stormwater

I asked Ray Santangelo and David Kadish if stormwater drainage was a factor in the design of building 574. “It was actually required,” Kadish said. “The age of the building resulted in a system that sent the storm water to the sewer lines, which is no longer allowed by the city’s code. This resulted in the installation of filtration tanks to mitigate the amount of water being sent to the city’s infrastructure.” Stormwater infiltration systems are used to collect, treat, and recharge stormwater runoff generated from impervious areas of developments, such as roofs, sidewalks, and parking lots.  They improve stormwater runoff quality and quantity and help to recharge underground aquifer water supplies, reduce the total volume and peak rate of runoff discharged from a site, and reduce the amount of water directed to City stormwater collection systems.IMG_3645

The conversation also included stormwater recharge systems. Kadish explained these in great detail. “For the 574 Boston Avenue project, there are a few different types of stormwater recharge systems, including pervious pavers, a drywell, and two pipe and stone systems. Pervious pavers allow runoff to infiltrate by providing enough space between each individual paver for water to pass into the underlying soils. A drywell is a concrete chamber with small holes in the concrete walls that drain the chamber. Pipe and stone systems are a mix of perforated pipe surrounded by crushed stone.” Crushed stone is a useful material for infiltration systems because of its high void properties. The more void space a soil has, the more stormwater it can ultimately store and infiltrate. All three types of systems use the same process, which is to collect runoff from impervious surfaces, store it within the system, and slowly let the runoff infiltrate into the underlying soil.

One of the challenges of the 574 Boston Avenue project was to reduce the total amount of runoff offsite. “The Harvard Avenue stormwater system was already overloaded and floods during large storm events,” the men explain. “The City required that we reduce the amount of runoff sent to the Harvard Street stormwater system by implementing infiltration systems to reduce runoff from the 574 site. The infiltration system on the Harvard Avenue side of the project was designed to store a 10-year storm, or 4.6-inches of rain in a 24-hour period.”

IMG_3650This also has ramifications for the building’s LEED rating system, the environmental rating that assesses the green design of a project. Stormwater Quantity ratings require that a site infiltrate at least 25% of the runoff generated by a site. Using the techniques described above, the 574 Boston Avenue project will reduce the runoff sent to the City stormwater systems by almost 60%, a true representation of the design team’s dedication to sustainability.

Blog Update: “Unwrapping Building 574″ is Now Available!

The Office of Sustainability is proud to present Part 1 of Unwrapping Building 574, a three part blog on Tufts’ current building project.

Building 574 represents the future of sustainability on Tufts Campus, with green initiatives designed into the building. Due to the uniqueness of the site and age of the building, the project requires some unique initiative and planning to make such a concept feasible. Communications intern Timothy Grant interviewed Ray Santangelo, the project manager, and one of the building’s head architects, David Kasdish, on 574 and what it means for sustainability. Even without a background on the subject, the interview is fascinating and easy to follow. Part 1 includes the history of building and some initiatives to include sustainable design. Part 1 is Available Now!

Outreach and Communications Manager, USCBG (MA)

DEADLINE: February 3, 2014
USGBC Massachusetts is currently hiring for the following position:
 
Outreach & Communications Manager
 
Overview
The USGBC Massachusetts Chapter promotes and advocates for green buildings throughout the state. We support the professional development of green building professionals and the credential maintenance of LEED Accredited Professionals and Green Associates in Massachusetts. As a chapter of the larger national US Green Building Council, we advocate for state and local laws and regulations that promote green buildings, sustainable development and healthy materials choices. We are expanding our capacity to make a difference in the green building industry in the state. We have a staffed Green Schools Program which is a wonderful new avenue for us to connect with a broader constituency, outside of the building industry. We want to connect to more schools stakeholders and grow our capacity to green the schools of Massachusetts. We are hiring an Outreach & Communications Manager to support this vital work.
 
Job Summary
The Outreach & Communications Manager (OCM) is a part-time position responsible for managing all recurring organizational communications and stakeholder engagement. The position will cultivate community and build our member & funder base through consistent communication and promotion of our activities.
 
The USGBC MA takes a collaborative and whole-systems approach to leadership and planning among our stakeholders, and we are looking for someone who has the experience and desire to work in a shared responsibility environment, and who is flexible and committed to the overall advancement of the organization.
 
The OCM position is a critical role responsible for raising the organizational profile and generate greater interest in our programming on behalf of the green building industry in Massachusetts. We are looking for a dedicated, experienced, and enthusiastic relationship-builder and communications specialist with the commitment, skills, and desire required to continue growing and sustaining the resources USGBC MA needs to fulfill its mission. The position will be supervised by the Executive Director and work closely with the Green Schools Program Manager.
 
Primary Duties and Responsibilities:
The Outreach & Communications Manager will have two primary areas of responsibility:
Outreach
  • Cultivate and nurture relationships with current and potential donors as well as outreach to the professional community (collaborate with ED)
  • Staff public events to ensure the Chapter message gets to stakeholders
  • Serve as direct contact for members, event registrations and website questions
  • Monitor trends in the community and adapt strategies as necessary
 
Communications and Documentation
  • Design, develop and drive strategy and content for all online & offline communications for the purposes of documenting and promoting our work, and growing our base of followers and supporters
  • Manage the website & scrolling news items
  • Coordinate the documentation of all programming onto our blog etc.
  • Manage social media pages/streams
  • Build relationships with community stake holders and/or partners to advance the mission and fundraising goals of the organization
  • Enhance membership orientation and recruitment and correct technical issues with member profiles or use of the website and its resources
 
In addition, the OCM will play a co-equal role in staff-wide requirements:
  • Contribute to fundraising efforts by participating in strategic fundraising planning, meetings, events and activities;
  • Co-Plan Organizational Development, working with the team to help USGBC MA continue to grow and evolve to meet the needs of our network and our mission, including regular staff meetings, and organizational planning and evaluation retreats;
  • Demonstrate leadership and solidarity in network development, engaging and growing the diverse spectrum of stakeholders and communities that USGBC MA seeks to serve and empower.
 
In order to fulfill the stated responsibilities of the role, the ideal candidate will have the following skills and experience:
  • Passionate commitment to the principles of sustainability, regeneration, green building, and community development;
  • Demonstrated skills and experience in the areas listed above under “Primary Duties & Responsibilities”;
  • Enthusiasm for fundraising, writing, organizational development, and sustaining and improving the overall health of the organization;
  • Strong online communications skills, including email, social media, web publishing and analytics; HTML, WordPress or other website editing skills a strong plus;
  • Detail-oriented, thorough; nothing slips by;
  • Prolific and efficient writing skills; ability to write in a variety of styles for multiple audiences;
  • Fluency with graphic design programs and the creation of compelling graphics for marketing purposes;
  • Extensive knowledge of and experience using CRM software and spreadsheets;
  • Successful experience coordinating volunteers and other unpaid stakeholders;
  • Experience working successfully on a multi-location team;
  • Strong work ethic, highly self-motivated;
  • Flexibility in the job role, understanding the need to dynamically respond to evolving and USGBC MA needs that are often driven by external events and opportunities;
  • Willing and able to travel occasionally.
 
Ideally, also:
  • Experienced with green building practices and community sustainability;
  • Experience in association management and engagement;
  • Comfort and experience in public speaking roles;
  • Multimedia skills a plus, including audio, video, and image editing capabilities;
  • Sense of humor!
 
Compensation
$20,000 starting annual salary (for 20h/wk);
Generous vacation & flexible work time policy.
 
To apply, please send a cover letter to Grey Lee, Executive Director, describing your qualifications, and your resume, at info@usgbcma.org by February 3, 2014. We will pursue references of qualified candidates. We look forward to hearing from you!

The View from Blakeley Hall

This is Andrew, the Fletcher School’s Eco-Representative. For this week’s post I’ll give you an idea of what it is like to be the Eco-Rep for Blakeley Hall, Fletcher’s graduate student dormitory. First, some background: Blakeley was built in 1926, in a Georgian style of architecture. It has three wings set around a courtyard, with seven independent towers of rooms. The middle tower houses Blakeley’s common room and kitchen, which serves as the busiest gathering space for residents, and the source of delicious smells when students cook dinner or prepare baked goods as a method of procrastination during exam periods…

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Every year, about eighty students in Fletcher’s various degree programs spend a year (or a semester, for exchange students) in singles, doubles, and triples. Many residents come from overseas, which results in a vibrant social scene and a tremendous variety of cuisines prepared in the kitchen. Residents routinely come together for dorm-wide events, like communal cooking events, pick-up cricket matches in the courtyard, and Fletcher’s infamous Blakeley Halloween Party.

As to Eco-Rep and sustainability initiatives, Blakeley, like all Tufts dorms, has receptacles for recycling and compost collection. Each tower contains recycling containers on the ground floor, and the communal compost bin is located in the kitchen. I am happy to report that since the beginning of the school year, Blakeley residents have increased their average weekly compost collection by about 60%! Lastly, each of Blakeley’s towers will contain boxes for TerraCycle recycling. Regarding recycling, we may have to wait until Recyclemania to ascertain how well residents are sorting their materials. Residents have been keeping tabs on recycling and composting, asking me many good questions, and offering suggestions on ways to make Blakeley even greener. I’m very encouraged thus far by their enthusiasm and look forward to holding further Eco-Rep events at the dorm. Next up this month: a pie baking event with a review of composting and recycling best practices!

Oct. 4: MIT’s Urbanfilm Hosts “The City Dark”

Urban Planning Film Series
A mostly-weekly series showing documentary and feature films on topics related to cities, urbanism, design, community development, ecology, and other planning issues. Free.

Time: 6:00p–8:00p

Location: MIT Room 3-133

A feature documentary about light pollution and the disappearing night sky. It premiered in competition at the 2011 South by Southwest Film Festival, where it won the Jury Prize for Best Score/Music. After moving to light-polluted New York City from rural Maine, filmmaker Ian Cheney asks: “Do we need the dark?” Exploring the threat of killer asteroids in Hawai’i, tracking hatching turtles along the Florida coast, and rescuing injured birds on Chicago streets, Cheney unravels the myriad implications of a globe glittering with lights — including increased breast cancer rates from exposure to light at night, and a generation of kids without a glimpse of the universe above. Featuring stunning astrophotography and a cast of eclectic scientists, philosophers, historians, and lighting designers, THE CITY DARK is the definitive story of light pollution and the disappearing stars.

Presented in conjunction with the PBS “POV” Community Network.

Special guest: Susanne Seitinger, City Innovations Manager, Philips Color Kinetics.

Open to: the general public

Sep 15: NESEA Annual Meeting (Portland, ME)

The Northeast Sustainable Energy Association (NESEA) Community is gathering on September 15th at the Portland Public Library for our 2012 Annual Meeting, and you’re invited to join us!

What’s on the agenda?

  • Panel Discussion on the “Pretty Good House.”
  • Tour of Portland Public Library’s high performance systems.
  • Walking tours of nearby buildings with sustainable design.
  • Remarks from the NESEA Board and Executive Director.
  • Reception and networking.

Visit http://www.nesea.org/meetups/  to get signed up.

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