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Faculty Position Available: Sustainability and Environmental Policy- Quest University Canada

Quest University Canada invites applicants for a full-time continuing faculty position in the area of Sustainability and Environmental Policy. The University seeks applications from individuals who show evidence of innovative pedagogy, collaborative teaching, and creative curriculum development across disciplines.
The University invites applicants with a background in life, physical or social sciences, and demonstrated research contributions in scientifically based sustainability and environmental policy. Areas of study could include climate change, air, water or soil quality, energy use, waste management, agriculture, forestry, urban development, technology, or socio-ecological resilience. Those with research foci in wildlife conservation biology, marine conservation, protected areas, or ecology need not apply. Preference will be given to candidates with a) strong quantitative and data analysis skills, and/or GIS skills, and b) expertise in US and/or Canadian environmental policy.
The successful candidate will demonstrate experience in and desire to develop interdisciplinary Concentration courses and teach Foundation courses across the Life Sciences, Physical Sciences, and Social Sciences.  A PhD (or equivalent) and demonstrated teaching experience are required. Applicants must have taught, led and designed at least one, 40+ hour university-level course. Although research, especially that involving undergraduates, is encouraged, those seeking a research-focused faculty position should not apply.
All applications must include (1) a cover letter of no more than two pages (a) demonstrating familiarity with the Quest academic program, (b) specifying how your specific previous research or teaching experiences make you qualified to teach Foundation courses across at least two of our academic divisions, (c) discussing which interdisciplinary courses you can create for our Concentration program and how it will expand our current offerings to Quest students, and (d) explaining what you can contribute to our innovative curriculum; (2) a curriculum vitae, including the name and contact information of three references, and (3) a one page statement of teaching philosophy. Applications should be sent to lsfaculty@questu.ca. The start date for the position will be August 1, 2014.

 

Massachusetts Clean Energy Internship Program

 MassCEC and the New England Clean Energy Council help prepare the next generation of clean energy workers by connecting students and recent graduates with Massachusetts companies in need of interns. Since its inception in 2011, this program has placed hundreds of students and recent graduates in clean energy companies across the Commonwealth, with dozens of those interns going on to receive full-time job opportunities at their host companies.

To participate in the program, students and recent graduates must have attended a Massachusetts college or university or be a Massachusetts resident. Your resume will be included in a “resume book” that companies have access to and can contact you if there is a good fit. MassCEC also keeps a clean energy job board, which lists up-to-date employment opportunities.

 

Submit your resume here
Please email workforce@masscec.com with any questions.

Climate Summer program, Better Future Project

Application deadline: March 1, 2014

Climate Summer is a leadership development program for young adults who join with communities across New England to participate in both building the fossil fuel resistance and supporting the development of the solutions we need to mitigate and adapt to climate change. We know that now is the time to act, and each summer, we share basic organizing skills with dozens of young people and then send them out on the road in small teams to live and work together, to learn from local partners, and to bring energy and a movement-building perspective into communities across the region.

Learn more.

Various positions, C40 Cities Climate Leadership Group (Multiple locations)

C40 supports the world’s megacities in achieving meaningful reductions of greenhouse gas emissions and climate risk. Through C40, the governments of 63 world cities share knowledge and work together on local efforts that achieve global impact. The jobs are in: Communications, Governance & Global Partnerships, and Operations. View the job descriptions here.

Vice Present, Climate and Energy Programs, CERES (Boston)

Ceres is seeking a Vice President of Climate & Energy Programs to lead strategy, initiatives, and sector-based programming in a fast-paced, not-for-profit, organization with a $9+ million budget. This is an exceptional opportunity for an experienced professional to build on Ceres’ solid achievements in promoting a market-oriented change agenda, in engaging businesses and investors, and in mobilizing them to take action in ways that further the public and environmental good. To apply, email a resume and cover letter directly to maureen@msalkinassociates.com

Learn more. 

Multiple Positions, US State Dept of Global Change

The U.S. State Department’s Office of Global Change (OES/EGC) seeks candidates for positions as Senior Climate Change Negotiator; Junior Climate Change Negotiator; Senior Climate Finance Negotiator and Special Assistant to the Office Director.  We are especially interested in candidates who have prior experience in fields related to climate change.  Contact: Kenneth Longmyer for more information at: LongmyerK@state.gov.

Social Media and Marketing Intern, ClimateStore (Boston, MA)

Interested in doing something about Climate Change? We are! We’re the ClimateStore and we believe Climate Change is the most pressing issue of our time.

We’re a for profit start-up with an environmental mission: to provide high quality products to people interested in mitigating human caused Climate Change through personal action. We get the link between fossil fuel energy use, GHG emissions, Climate Change and the urgent need to move to a clean, energy efficient, economy. We believe this is our stewardship moment.

Our mission is to make it fun and easy for people to reduce their carbon footprint. At the ClimateStore you can learn about the causes of Climate Change, keep informed about its impact, and find great ideas and products to reduce your energy use from fossil fuels.

We’re looking for talented people who share our passion for the natural world, think broadly about sustainable living and believe there is still time to act. We currently have an opening for a Social Media and Marketing Intern with experience with low carbon footprint/energy saving products to support the growth of our core product line.

Learn more/apply!

Student Sustainability Program Adviser, U Illinois Urbana-Champaign

DEADLINE: October 14th, 2013

The Illini Union at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign is seeking a talented student affairs professional to serve as a Program Advisor in the Student Programs and Activities Office.  Founded in 1867, the Illinois campus is one of the original 37 public land-grant institutions. It is one of the top comprehensive research public universities in the nation. The successful candidate will be working on a campus with an academically talented and diverse student population, including 19 percent international students, 12 percent Asian American students, 5 percent African American students and 6 percent Hispanic/Latino students from a total enrollment over 42,000 students.  As the community center of the University, the Illini Union draws together all members of the University with approximately 16,000 visits of students, faculty, staff, alumni and guests on a daily basis.

Learn more!

Tufts Eco-Ambassadors Take on Styrofoam Mountain

Styrofoam seems to be a perpetual nightmare for environmentalists. A petroleum-based plastic foam consisting mostly of air, it can’t be composted or thrown in with most municipal recycling programs, but for many uses it remains the only practical product.

For example, when departments at Tufts order biomaterials, gel packs or dry ice, styrofoam is the only feasible shipping option, as it keeps the materials cool. Enter Emily Edwards, a staff member in the Chemical and Bioengineering Department, and Abbey Licht, a graduate student in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, both of whom became Eco-Ambassadors in 2011 at the Science and Technology Center on our Medford campus. They grew curious when they noticed those unmistakable white shipping containers piling up outside labs and classrooms in their hallway: Could they redirect styrofoam away from landfills?

To assess how much actual need existed, Edwards and Licht began collecting the boxes from the SciTech building in a storage room. After just a month, sixty boxes had accumulated.

Hoping that a solution might already exist on campus, they first talked to Dawn Quirk, the Waste Reduction Program Manager in the Facilities Services Department, about recycling the styrofoam shipping containers. Unfortunately, while the Tufts Recycles program accepts a wide variety of glass, plastic, and metal items, styrofoam can’t go into our green bins.

Above: a month of styrofoam.

Edwards and Licht knew of a local company that would recycle the styrofoam. ReFoamIt, based in Framingham, Massachusetts, compacts the styrofoam into logs at a plant in Rhode Island, then ships it away to be turned into toys and other consumer products.  But Edwards and Licht were also aware that the boxes they were storing were at least 89% air. Could they somehow reduce the volume of the styrofoam to make for easier storage and more efficient transportation? If they handled the styrofoam themselves, would the environmental impact be lower than that of ReFoamIt’s trips to Rhode Island?

Both admit that they are first and foremost engineers, not chemists. Still, like students tackling a science class project, Edwards and Licht dove right in. They first experimented with physical change, recruiting volunteers to smash the styrofoam. They employed mallets and even had the volunteers jumping up and down on top of the boxes – but despite how light and airy styrofoam may seem, Edwards says, it’s a much harder material than one would think, and after hours of work there was little significant volume reduction. The exhausted volunteers placed the styrofoam chunks into bags to be picked up by ReFoamIt.

Not to be discouraged, Edwards and Licht next sought to turn the styrofoam back into a hard, dense plastic. Their first method was chemical: they placed pieces of the styrofoam in cups of acetone, which reduced the plastic to a goopy slime that hardened once the acetone evaporated. While the process resulted in a significant volume reduction, one bag of smashed styrofoam boxes required a whole gallon of acetone, which then evaporated into the air, so significant ventilation was required during the experiment. Moreover, the bottom of a tray of the hardening plastic took months to dry.

Above: a bag of styrofoam boxes, and the equivalent amount of hardened plastic after melting in acetone. The ratio of the volumes was about 50 to 1.

Next, Edwards and Licht melted styrofoam in a large oven at 464 degrees Fahrenheit. This experiment also successfully reduced the volume, but the process produced powerful fumes which filled the lab and the connected hallway. Moreover, only a certain amount of styrofoam could fit into the oven at a given time, so Edwards and Licht needed to open the oven periodically to add more foam, losing heat in the process.

Above: the result of melting styrofoam in an oven. The volume reduction was about the same as in the acetone experiment.

Finally, Edwards and Licht investigated alternatives to styrofoam. After hearing a story on NPR, Edwards ordered an Ecovative box made out of a mix of mushrooms and straw grown into a mold. The box’s weight is similar to that of styrofoam, but Edwards notes that the box has a slight smell and an unusual texture that might not appeal to the general public. So while the mushroom box was an interesting innovation, Edwards couldn’t see a widespread application for them at Tufts.

Above: the mushroom boxes from Ecovative.

 

Ultimately, Edwards and Licht determined that the most efficient, affordable and safe way to dispose of the accumulated styrofoam would be to set up a partnership with Save That Stuff, another local recycling company with which Tufts already has a relationship. Quirk organized a monthly pick-up arrangement, and it has been running smoothly ever since.

Above: sacks of styrofoam waiting for Save That Stuff.

Even though they weren’t able to find an effective way to minimize the styrofoam before sending it away, Licht and Edwards seem satisfied with the results. Licht mentions that until they started collecting the boxes in one room, she had never really thought about how much styrofoam the building used or where it all went. (Prior to their initiatives, it all went into the trash.) They seem eager to find where else this model can be applied at Tufts – there are bound to be other sites of potential improvement that go under the radar, undetected until someone dares to ask whether there might be another way.

Moving forward, Edwards and Licht and Tufts Recycles! are hoping to expand the use of the system they have established at SciTech to collect the styrofoam from labs at the Gordon Institute (200 Boston Avenue) and from the biology department.

Climate Adaptation Project Manager, Cambridge Systematics (Open Location)

We are seeking a project manager and technical expert with an understanding of the impacts of climate change on transportation and a broad understanding of risk management and transportation planning to lead extreme weather and climate change vulnerability assessments and adaptation strategy projects for regional, state, Federal, and international clients. Our work focuses on helping our clients understand the risks of extreme weather and climate change to multimodal transportation systems and cost-effectively integrate resiliency measures (adaptation strategies) into transportation planning and decision-making processes. The ideal candidate will have at least 5 years of transportation planning and policy and/or civil engineering work experience with strong communication skills, project management experience, business development experience, understanding of the application of climate data to the assessment of infrastructure and operational vulnerabilities, knowledge of asset management for transportation infrastructure, understanding of Geographic Information Systems (GIS), and broad transportation planning experience. Candidates will be expected to lead or support extreme weather and climate change vulnerability and adaptation studies, as well as lead or support general transportation planning projects. Experience with disaster risk management planning is a plus. Work assignments may include project management, performing research and data analysis, facilitating stakeholder and/or technical expert dialogues and workshops, preparing and delivering presentations, and documenting findings and recommendations. This is a superb opportunity to join and work with a group of bright and dedicated professionals in a stimulating, profitable environment. Qualifications: Ideal candidate will have a Master’s degree in Planning, Policy, and/or Civil Engineering, with emphasis on transportation (a Bachelor’s with additional years of experience is also acceptable); evidence of strong oral and written communications skills; project management experience; ability to work with multidisciplinary teams and independently; familiarity with GIS; willingness to travel; and desire for growth. Experience working with the U.S. DOT, state DOTs, MPOs, transit agencies, and/or multilateral/regional investment banks is highly desirable. Business development skills, including proactive marketing of clients, proposal development, and presentation skills also desirable. Foreign language skills are a plus.

 

Learn more.