Holiday gift ideas to spread the pollinator love

As you start (or finish?) your holiday shopping, here are some gift ideas to spread the love of pollinators.

For beginner and/or experienced gardeners

32 Plant Pollinator Garden, photo from prairienursery.com
  • Bee hotel/DIY kit: Bee hotels are a fun and easy way to support native bees in your own backyard or garden. While most people think about honey bees when they think “bee,” 90% of bee species nest alone in tunnels or holes. Putting out a bee hotel near your garden will provide more real estate for these bees. Here is a list of various bee hotel options.  
  • Pollinator introduction kit: This kit from Prairie Moon Nursery includes Pollinator Palooza seed mix (the mix we give out), a bee hotel kit, and a book on attracting native pollinators.
  • Pre-planned garden: For those who would like a pollinator garden but don’t want to do the planning, Prairie Nursery (not to be confused with Prairie Moon Nursery) sells a variety of pre-planned pollinator gardens complete with plants, planting instructions, and a design map. All gardens include a variety of perennials that will keep your garden blooming (i.e. providing food for pollinators!) from spring through fall.

For readers

Metallic green sweat bee, photo taken by Rachael E. Bonoan
  • Subscription to 2 Million Blossoms: The gift that will keep on giving through 2020, 2 Million Blossoms is a new quarterly magazine dedicated to transporting its readers to the world of pollinators. In the first issue, readers will get “distracted by bees” in my photo essay about bees on a Pacific Northwest prairie, like the brilliant green sweat bee, and the wildflowers they visit.
  • The Bees in Your Backyard by Joseph S. Wilson and Olivia Messinger Carril: This is one of my favorite books about bees! In this book, readers learn how to identify native bees that are likely in their backyard (in North America) and what they can do to help the bees. Gorgeous photos accompany easy-to-read text.
  • Honeybee Democracy by Thomas D. Seeley: My love for insect pollinators started with honey bees. Although they are not native to North America and are more of a domesticated animal than a wild pollinator, we can learn a lot about our native pollinators from studying honey bees! In this book, honey bee biologist Tom Seeley describes the amazing ways in which honey bees work together to make decisions as a group.

For foodies

Photo from proudpour.com
  • Honey: Raw honey is one of the sweetest gifts to give (pun very much intended). You can often find local beekeepers at holiday craft fairs selling their delicious honey (sometimes gorgeous beeswax candles too!). If you can’t make it to a craft fair or they’re just not your thing, there are companies that will ship raw, delicious honey right to your door! Some of my favorites are: GloryBee, Boston Honey Company, and Savannah Bee Company. If you’re local to the Boston Area, check out Follow the Honey , a brick-and-mortar where you can find (and taste!) honeys from New England and around the world. Honey varietals make great gifts—that friend from Canada will go crazy for Canadian White Gold.
  • Save the Bees Pinot Noir: Proud Pour’s Pinot Noir from Oregon will pair beautifully with that holiday roast chicken. As a bonus, proceeds go towards replanting wildflowers on farms local to where the wine is purchased!
  • Beeswrap: I love my beeswrap! An environmentally friendly alternative to the plastic baggie, beeswraps are fun fabrics coated in beeswax that are washable and reusable, and perfect for wrapping up that sandwich or snack. Beeswrap can also be used in place of plastic wrap to cover and store leftovers.

For fashionistas

Cast honeycomb hoop earrings, photo from beeamour.com.
  • “Plant these” long-sleeved shirt: Support pollinator-friendly gardening as well as an artist with this adorable shirt from Etsy.
  • “Protect the pollinators” short-sleeved shirt: While TPI mainly focuses on insect pollinators, this shirt spreads pollinator love by including hummingbirds and bats in addition to insects.
  • Bee Amour jewelry: Made by a beekeeper in Texas, this jewelry is inspired by some of our most well-known managed pollinators, honey bees. Some of the pieces are even cast from actual honeycomb!

For the person who doesn’t need anything

Happy holidays from TPI!

Providing shelter for native bees

Last month I had the opportunity to run a workshop on protecting native bees for 250+ kids at Camp Micah in Bridgton, ME. Like humans, bees need three things: food, shelter, and water. In my workshop, the campers focused on shelter—we built 200 bee “hotels” to donate to the Honeybee Conservancy for their Sponsor-A-Hive program.  

We hear a lot about honey bees, which make their homes in hives, but most bees are solitary and make their homes in less conspicuous manner. Mining bees (Andrena species), as their name suggests, make their home by digging tunnels in bare soil. In addition to digging tunnels, cellophane bees (Colletes species) line their nests with a clear protective secretion that resembles…you guessed it..cellophane! To provide shelter for these types of bees, leave your garden un-mulched.

Hanging by a couple of our research hives, typical man-made honey bee hives, at Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts University. Photo: Rachael E. Bonoan
Blue orchard mason bee (Osmia lignaria) female.
Photo: USGS Bee Inventory and Monitoring Lab

Mason bees and leaf-cutter bees also nest in tunnels, but they do so a bit differently. These bees use ready-made tunnels in wood, hollow sticks, or dried-out plant stems. Female mason and leaf-cutter bees collect pollen and nectar to make a “food ball,” which she shoves to the very bottom of the nest. She then lays an egg on top of this food ball and makes a divider out of either mud (mason bees) or leaves (leaf-cutter bees). The momma bee then collects materials to make another food ball, which she puts in front of her “divider,” lays another egg, and the cycle continues until the nest is full of food and baby bees.

Cross-section of a blue orchard mason bee (Osmia lignaria) nest with mud dividers, orange-yellow food balls, and bright white bee eggs.
Photo: USDA ARS

The baby bees hatch out of their eggs, eat their nutritious food ball and develop from larvae, to pupae, to adult. In mason bees, pupae spin a cozy cocoon in which they complete their development to adult. The adult mason bees stay inside their cocoon until the weather is just right. In early spring, they chew their way out and emerge into the bright new world. To provide shelter for these bees, leave some of the larger, dried out stems in your garden. Or, like the campers, you can make a bee hotel!

Bee hotels don’t have to be five-star. They can be as simple as taking some dried out stems or reeds, creating a bundle, and securing the bundle with twine. You can hang this bundle somewhere near your garden (where the bees have food!) or in a tree. A variety of tunnel sizes ensures a variety of bees can use your bee hotel—bees come in many shapes and sizes. To provide enough space for the momma bee and her babies, the tunnels should be about 4 – 10 mm in diameter and about 15 cm (6 inches) long. If you don’t have dried-out stems readily available, you can purchase small cardboard tubes or paper straws to make your bundle. Avoid using plastic straws or bamboo as they don’t let the nutritious food ball breathe and may harbor mold.

You can add some amenities to your bee hotel in the form of PVC. A piece of PVC pipe 2 – 4 inches in diameter and a few inches longer than your tubes allows for some protection from the elements. Simply place a cap at one end of the PVC and pack your tubes in until they fit snugly. Again, use twine or if needed, zip ties, to secure your bee hotel. To keep birds and other possible predators out, you can add a security system with 1-inch wire mesh loosely secured to the front of your bee hotel. If possible, face the entrance of your bee hotel to the south so the bees get lots of warm morning sun (and a nice view).

When constructing your bee hotel, think about making it as big as the food (flowers) in your general area will support—you don’t want to raise too many bees and not have enough food. A meadow of wildflowers can support more/larger bee hotels than a small urban garden. To avoid spreading disease, replace the hotel’s linens (the tunnels) every year or two. In March and April, watch the entrance to your bee hotel to see how many bees emerge!

The butterflies who are raised by ants

Written by: Atticus Murphy

Silvery blue caterpillar. Photo: Atticus Murphy

What are these ants doing, clustering around a caterpillar? If you guessed eating, you’d be right, but probably not in the way you imagined.

These ants are engaged in what’s called “tending,” and far from being harmed by the interaction, the soft and vulnerable caterpillar is likely a beneficiary. In fact, the caterpillar has a suite of complex adaptations that seem aimed at keeping ants nearby. Most striking among these is the dorsal nectary organ, a gland that secretes a nutritious liquid high in sugar. Foraging worker ants eagerly consume the food and bring it back to their colonies. The cost to the caterpillar is only the cost of producing these little nutrition packets.

A less attractive ant and a silvery blue caterpillar. Photo: Atticus Murphy

But why would a caterpillar want a murderous cadre of ants clustered around it? The answer is protection. For one thing, when you manage to get the bullies on your side, they won’t bully you anymore: that is, the pacified ants are no longer a threat to the caterpillar. And in general, being a caterpillar is very dangerous. They have soft bodies, often feed in the open, and are not known for their quick movement, making them easy prey. In addition to being eaten directly, there are a huge diversity of parasitoids in the insect world, who lay eggs inside caterpillars’ bodies and eat their way out. This kills the caterpillar. A standing guard of ants, who generally protect their food sources and each other, lowers the caterpillar’s risk of being parasitized. Thus, because this interaction is often mutually beneficial, we call it a mutualism, meaning that both the ants and the caterpillars do better because of it: ants get food and caterpillars get protection.

Ants tending a silvery blue caterpillar, who is releasing a droplet from the dorsal nectary organ (the tiny glimmer in the center of the photo). This is located at the rear end of the caterpillar. Photo: Atticus Murphy.

In order to keep their attendants friendly, the caterpillar can also release a potent cocktail of chemicals that mimic ant pheromones, encouraging the ants to stick around, and hopefully keeping them from trying a bite of caterpillar. This cocktail is so effective that sometimes the ants can’t distinguish the scent of the caterpillar from their own kind. If the ants are absent and a predator approaches, some caterpillars also make use of specialized organs that produce noises or fragrances, attracting ants from farther away.

An adult female Silvery Blue lays an egg on lupine: within 3 days the egg will hatch, and within a week it will be old enough to attract ant attendants. Photo: Rachael Bonoan.

The butterfly species in the pictures above is the one I worked with this summer, the silvery blue (Glaucopsyche lygdamus). It’s common across the U.S., but this interaction is a global phenomenon, occurring in hundreds of butterfly species that can be found on every continent except Antarctica. And with a diversity of species comes a diversity of interactions: many different ant-caterpillar pairings have emerged, and unique quirks abound. Perhaps the most captivating variations on the theme are the parasitic blue butterflies. These dastardly caterpillars have taken the usual mutually beneficial interaction and tilted things decidedly in their own favor by truly pretending to be baby ants. After spending some time feeding on a host plant like most caterpillars do, these species use their unusually effective chemical mimicry to induce ants to take them inside the actual nest, where the caterpillars are either fed alongside the real ant young, or more sinisterly, the caterpillar devours the ant young, growing fat by pillaging their hosts until they’re ready to emerge as adults.

The Large Blue butterfly, a parasitic relative of the Silvery Blue. Photo: Ann Collier.

The ant-tending of these butterflies is not just an interesting quirk of natural history, but for some species may be the key to their continued existence. The classic example of this possibility is the large blue butterfly (Phengaris arion) of Britain, which is a parasite of Myrmica ants. This butterfly was on the decline for decades in the British Isles and was an early beneficiary of an intensive conservation campaign. Unfortunately, this campaign failed, and by the 1970s, the species teetered on the edge of extinction in spite of years of efforts. The conservationists were perplexed. They had carefully cultivated healthy patches of the host plant, Thymus, and there looked to be plenty of ants in the area, so why were the butterflies still declining?

It took a careful reexamination of the already well-known dependence on Myrmica ants to understand what had occurred. The large blue was an unrecognized specialist, a butterfly who relied not just on Myrmica ants to survive, but on a particular species of Myrmica ant. This species was so crucial that even close relatives were totally unsuitable and could not successfully “raise” caterpillars to adulthood. While there were indeed plenty of Thymus plants and plenty of Myrmica ants, the ants were of the wrong species! The large blue tragically went extinct in Britain before this new knowledge could be put in practice, but it has since been successfully reintroduced.

So, the next time you see a blue butterfly, remember that it might well have relied on an unruly bunch of ant nannies to survive into its winged form. Remember also that these butterflies provide still another example of the myriad ways in which our pollinators are dependent on an entire healthy ecosystem and its component parts, not just on their host plants.

Further Reading:

Pierce, N. E., M. F. Braby, A. Heath, D. J. Lohman, J. Mathew, D. B. Rand, and M. A. Travassos. 2002. The ecology and evolution of ant association in the Lycaenidae. Annual Review of Entomology 47:733–771.

Thomas, J. A., D. J. Simcox, and R. T. Clarke. 2009. Successful Conservation of a Threatened Maculinea Butterfly. Science 325:80–83.

Thank you, Green Fund!

All the way back in January, Nick Dorian got a group of pollinator-enthusiasts together, including myself, to come up with the following short description of what would become the Tufts Pollinator Initiative and our Tufts Green Fund application.


Common eastern bumble bee

Worldwide pollinator declines threaten food security and ecosystem health. The importance of local solutions to this global problem, such as planting native flowers and reducing pesticide use, has been widely documented. We propose the Tufts Pollinator Initiative (TPI), an educational, ecological, and collaborative plan to bolster pollinator health and promote community awareness on the Medford/Somerville campus. Within two years, TPI will:

  1. Showcase pollinator-friendly plants on the Tufts campus through interpretive signage and guided campus walks;
  2. Cultivate 500 square feet of perennial, low-input pollinator habitat which will also beautify our campus;
  3. Integrate pollinator habitat into interdisciplinary courses (e.g. BIO 51, BIO 185, EXP 21), workshops, and undergraduate research opportunities (e.g. BIO 93/94, BIO 193/194); and
  4. Secure accreditation for Tufts from the Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation as a Bee Campus USA, setting a precedent for metropolitan campuses.

We’ve assembled a passionate team of faculty, post-docs, graduate students, and undergraduates with diverse backgrounds in botany, pollinator ecology, and community outreach to ensure that we meet the goals of TPI. #savethebees


In early February, we were excited to hear that we had moved on to the “Revised Proposal” stage in which we had to answer questions about the project. In late February, we were ecstatic to learn we had moved on the to “Final Proposal” stage where we were tasked with outlining impacts of our project. And finally, in early March, along with six other finalists, our team was invited to pitch our project to the Tufts Green Fund committee. We had 5 minutes to convince the Green Fund that our project was worth funding. Boy, did Nick and I practice.

On the day of our pitch, we were grateful for the support we received from both friends and colleagues–it was a great turn out (even for an early Friday morning) and we had a blast talking about our project! And then, we waited…

On Monday afternoon, the email came…the Green Fund had decided to fund our project! We are so appreciative to the Green Fund for supporting our initiative and cannot wait to make Tufts a better place for pollinators! To learn more about our team, visit Meet the Team.

Stay tuned for planting guides, pollinator walks, and posts about pollinator-centric happenings here at Tufts!