Siblings and Host Siblings: Worlds Collide

By Rebeca Becdach

Over the course of the nine months I spent with my host family, we got very close. My host mom, Maria, treated me like a daughter and was always open to talking about anything I was dealing with. My host sister, Irene, and I shared music with each other and went on little excursions every once in a while. We had long conversations, watched an obscene amount of vine compilations, and practiced doing make-up on my face, among other things. She is 15, just like my little brother. Towards the end of my nine months in Madrid, Mikel, another fellow in Madrid, gave me the idea of doing an exchange of sorts with our siblings and host siblings. Maria and Irene loved the idea. For the month of October Irene stayed with my family in my hometown in Alabama (Huntsville). My brother and Irene got along pretty well. Irene got to go school with my brother and visit Orlando with my family (thank goodness because Alabama is not that exciting). I went to visit her on one of the weekends she was with my family. We took her to the lake (classic Alabama activity) and had a great time catching up. The following weekend, my family and Irene came to Boston to see me and we toured the city together. Seeing her again after a few months was wonderful and so much fun. It was like my two worlds, the U.S and Madrid, had finally met. Maria told me after Irene went back to Madrid that Irene benefited so much from the change in environment and meeting new people. She seems to be more outgoing now, which is exactly what happened to me after living in Madrid. Irene and I now share this experience of living with each other’s families, which I think is really special. I know I always have a home in Madrid, and Irene knows she always has a home here in the U.S.

 

A Trip back to Spain

By Evan Robison

Six months can feel like a long time. Since I last saw my host family, I had made an entirely new group of friends at Tufts, joined the sailing team, and switched my major at least four times. But as soon as I saw my host sister and parents in the airport in Madrid, I knew that despite our time apart, we would have no trouble jumping right back into our relationship. For over a week, I played, laughed, and chatted with my host siblings, parents, and grandfather, sharing stories from our time apart and reminiscing on our year together. I visited the school where I had been placed last year, having only told a handful of people that I would be coming. Just like with my host family, I knew from my short conversations with the teachers and students that I would always have a home both at the school and in Madrid whenever I wanted to visit. When I had to return to the US at the end of my trip, it was hard to leave my family and friends again after having only been there for nine days, but I stand reassured that no matter how long we go until we see each other next, we’ll always be able to reconnect and enjoy each other’s company.

 

Bus rides: Reflection, Spurts of Wisdom, and Slight Nausea

By Erica DeBarge

It has been roughly eight months since we left our 1+4 host sites, and I’m currently on a bus from Hartford to Cambridge after a relaxing winter break. During my bridge year, I spent so many hours on buses, that if I didn’t look up every once in a while, I might forget that I’m actually in Connecticut.

Yes, time has passed. But I don’t find myself forgetting. Not the important stuff anyways. There is no way the terrazas and golden streets of Madrid at dusk, the constant buzzing of el Retiro, the shrieks and cackles of my host sisters, or the salty, wholesome taste of tortilla could ever slip from my memory. And if I do happen to do a little forgetting, I always have the “a year ago today” Google Photos notifications to remind me of the gorgeous cities I was galavanting exactly 365 days ago (as I sit in the library).

I’ve done my fair share of missing, but now I find comfort in my future. Madrid was an inexplicably beautiful experience, but college has begun! I can now study and live and laugh with my closest friends (who are also gifts from 1+4). Some people struggle freshman year to find their people, but I’m lucky to have already located mine.

My first semester back to school went rather swimmingly, but it wasn’t perfect. Something that bothered me and served as a source of stress was my low number of clubs and activities. In September, I was focused on my studies and getting back into the swing of academics, and I was afraid to stretch myself too thin my first semester. Therefore, I didn’t join as many clubs as everyone else had.

Over winter break, I decided to address my dissatisfaction. I scoured the 2020 and 2021 Facebook pages to join e-lists and apply for e-board positions in organizations that looked fascinating to me. I liked pages, researched websites, emailed professors and community service organizations, and became very close with Student Information Services. I can’t wait to get back to campus, get involved, and take charge of this semester.

The moral of the story is that everyone goes at their own pace. Stay present, stay golden, and don’t freak out!

My 1+4 Story: Aberdeen Bird

Hello world it’s me, writing a personal blog for the first time in a long time.  What am I up to?  Currently I’m laying on the president’s lawn at Tufts enjoying the 80 degree weather (so long as I pretend our planet isn’t dying) with a new friend I made this semester.  First semester here I saw a lot of people around campus that I wanted to be friends with but never reached out to so my social goal this semester was to approach everyone I had a “friend crush” on and try to befriend them.  So far it’s worked out swimmingly.  I used to approach situations from the standpoint of “Oh no… they’re too cool for me…” but I realized that’s ridiculous and if someone thought they were “too cool” for new friends then I probably wouldn’t want to be friends with them anyway.  I’ve worked to surround myself with people I enjoy being around- people I want to make happy and people who want to make me happy, largely my 1+4 friends, because being emotionally content is just as important as doing well academically and I think I solidified that life outlook last year.

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