Author: Elyssa G. Anneser (page 1 of 5)

Environmental Justice

 

Take a moment to think about your environment, where you grew up, and where you currently live? Did you have a yard? Did you walk around and see trees along your street? Was the Flint Water Crisis the first time that you considered that some places in this country have unsafe drinking water?

The environment is central to all human activity, and the treatment of the environment is inherently linked to the treatment of the people who live there. The EPA has defined environmental justice as “the fair treatment and meaningful involvement of all people regardless of race, color, national origin, or income, with respect to the development, implementation, and enforcement of environmental laws, regulations, and policies.” Historically, protection of environmental quality, like other resources such as money and time, has been unequally enforced across the country. Communities with more social capital and societal influences, therefore, have greater access to a healthy, safe, and livable environment with access to safe drinking water, clean air, and healthy, affordable food.

The water crisis in Flint, Michigan found tremendous health impacts from entirely preventable leaching of lead in the predominately Black community’s drinking water. This is a classic example of environmental racism and brought the issue of environmental justice to the national spotlight. In the city, low-income areas and neighborhoods have disproportionally high levels of lead in their water. Globally, we see environmental injustices when discussing the future effects of climate change. According to The World Bank, the countries that will see the greatest negative impacts from our warming climate are disproportionately low-income nations.

Environmental injustices typically stem from lacking access to political capital and voice in government and industry decision-making. Wealthier communities have more disposable income and time to spend to have their voices and concerns heard. While historically the environment reinforces existing inequalities across communities, increasing awareness and advocacy for the environment through the lens of justice and health can achieve more equitable outcomes.

When advocating for the environment or any social justice issue, we all must recognize how our backgrounds or privileges have shaped us. White activists must recognize white privilege (https://www.pachamama.org/news/race-and-class-privilege-in-the-environmental-movement), and how historically white privilege has come at the cost of quality of life for communities of color and low-income globally. We can use their privileged position in society to advocate for historically disadvantaged communities and uplift their voices to be heard and protected.

Want to learn more about environmental justice and the inequalities between the global north and south? Read the Yale Environment 360’s article on how increased per capita consumption is a greater global threat than increased population.

U.S. Prig Fellowship

SPEAK FOR THE PUBLIC INTEREST
Every day, whether it’s in Washington, D.C., a state capitol, or a corporate boardroom, someone is making a decision that will affect all of us – it could be about our health, our safety, or our democracy.

Special interest groups spend billions of dollars to influence these decisions. Someone needs to speak for the public interest. As a U.S. PIRG Fellow, that’s what you’ll do.

WHAT IT MEANS TO BE A FELLOW
You won’t just sit behind a desk. You’ll be out in the real world, working on everything from reducing the overuse of antibiotics in the food industry to defending consumer protections on Wall Street. You’ll be recruiting new groups to join a coalition, speaking in a church basement or town hall to win a new endorsement, organizing a news event or rally, meeting with an editorial board, or doing whatever else it takes to get results.

This is a two-year program, expressly designed to prepare future leaders with U.S. PIRG. We look for smarts, leadership experience, top-notch written and verbal skills, and an eagerness to learn. We value experience organizing, including building campus groups.

PAY & BENEFITS
The target annual compensation for this position is $26,500 in the first year. U.S. PIRG offers a competitive benefits package. We also offer an excellent training program and opportunities for advancement. To learn more visit jobs.uspirg.org.

LOCATIONS & START DATES
We’re hiring for positions in Washington, D.C., Boston, Denver, New York City, and Portland, Oregon. If you’re flexible, you can apply for multiple locations. We accept applications on a rolling basis. Positions available starting immediately or in August 2018.

We also offer state-based fellowships in California, Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Maryland, New Jersey, New Mexico, Oregon, Texas, and Washington State.

ARE YOU READY TO SPEAK FOR THE PUBLIC INTEREST?

U.S. PIRG is part of The Public Interest Network—a group of organizations that share a vision of a better future, a set of core values, and a strategic approach to getting things done. Visit publicinterestnetwork.org to learn more. 

Apply online
Applications close January 31st

Post-Landfill Action Network (PLAN)

Student Advisory Board Member (Volunteer)

PLAN is launching a Student Advisory Board Committee to help guide the future of the organization and our relationships with campuses. We are seeking 6-8 passionate, critical students and recent graduates that are available to volunteer 2 hours every few months for a virtual board meeting.

Dates: One year commitment starting February 2018

Location: There is no requirement for geographical location of board members

 

Grassroots Expansion Fellow

The Grassroots Expansion Fellow will join the Campus Coordination team in expanding our network of student leaders in the zero waste movement.(Applications due Jan 22.)

Dates: Feb 19 – May 11th (with potential for future employment)

Location: Applicant must be located in the Mid-Atlantic region for the duration of the Fellowship.

Compensation: $5,000 stipend for 12 weeks

 

Creative Social Media Intern

PLAN is seeking a student with a knack for visual messaging and an interest in building social media campaigns with a variety of platforms.

Dates: January 19th – June 1st (Flexible)

Location: Satellite

Compensation: Unpaid, with possible school credit

For all of these positions Apply Online 
Apply Now

What does 2018 mean for the environment?

Last year, 2017, was a year of extremes for our environment. According to NASA, 2017 is likely to be the second hottest year in recorded history. Here in the United States, we saw the extraordinary power of three devastating hurricanes: Irma, Harvey, and Maria. Residents are still recovering from the destruction of these hurricanes. Widespread wildfires in California destroyed thousands of acres of land, homes, and lives. The year ended with a cold snap that has spread throughout the Northeast, leading to record low temperatures across the country. There is mounting evidence from climatologist that these extreme weather events will become more frequent with the increase of the greenhouse gases we emit into our atmosphere that contribute to climate change.
On June 1st of 2017, President Trump announced the withdrawal of American participation from the Paris Agreement. The Paris Agreement was the first of its kind, facilitated by the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC)that bound all countries to decrease their greenhouse gas emissions, in order to limit global warming to 2 degrees Celcius of pre-industrial temperatures. The agreement allows each nation to set their own emissions goals in accordance with the goals of the agreement. Find more information about the Paris Agreement from the UNFCC.

However, not all environmental news in 2017 was negative. There was a new wave of environmental activism and commitment to combat climate change in reaction to the Trump administration’s withdrawal from the Paris Agreement. The “We are still in” movement was launched immediately; thousands of companies, cities, states, and institutions, including Tufts, affirmed their commitment to the Paris Agreement despite the lack of federal support for the agreement. The President of France, Emmanuel Macron, created the Make our Planet Great Again initiative to provide funding and support for all who wish to conduct environmental research.

While 2017 was a year of climate and environmental political extremes, it was also a year of great environmental activism and commitment to combat climate change. What does this mean for 2018? We need to continue our commitment to environmental activism this year. One important way to do so is by advocating for the environment through our votes in the 2018 midterm elections and volunteering in our local communities. Another great way is to work to lower your personal environmental impact by reducing your carbon and waste footprint.

Reduce your waste and carbon footprint:

  • Eat less meat- try to eat less or even eliminate factory farmed meat for your diet.
  • Buy used– look for previously used or owned items before buying new.
  • Eat local- Sign up for a CSA share or check out your local farmer’s market.
  •  Say yes to reusable items- Opt for reusable products over single-use items.
  • Consume less- Don’t buy unnecessary items that will just wind up in the landfill
  •  Bike, walk, use public transportation, and carpool – Not only will it lower your carbon footprint, but it will also improve your personal health.
  • Use less plastic- Find package free items to reduce your plastic consumption.
  •  Share and connect- Share your passion for environmental causes with others.

The uncertainty of our collective environmental future can be frightening at times, so let us do all that we can to reduce our individual impact on the environment and hold our representatives accountable to protect their constituents by protecting the environment. In 2018, let’s get more civically engaged, environmentally aware, and passionate than ever before.

Learn from Bae Johnson how to reduce your waste this year:

 

Sustainability Data Analyst, Ocean Spray (Lakeville, MA)

Position Description:

The Cooperative Development department at Ocean Spray is looking to add a Sustainability Data Analyst on a temporary basis.  The Sustainability team collaborates with Agriculture Sciences, Marketing, Engineering, Quality, Procurement, Operations, Legal, Sales, and Ocean Spray Cranberry Farmer-Owners to execute initiatives throughout the Cooperative.

The Analyst will support a biennial Farm Sustainability Assessment, coordinating with a 3rd party vendor and Ocean Spray farmers to complete and analyze a large data set to identify performance trends.

The Analyst will also provide support to Operations Manufacturing energy, waste, and water data collection, review, and analysis including opportunities to improve or create a new database model, perform forecasting, and building a business case for a new approach to data management.

You may have the opportunity to support other areas of the sustainability department including field visits and on the job training in:

 

-Sustainable Agriculture

-Wate Stewardship

-Energy Efficency/Renewables

-Enviornmental Health & Safety

-Packaging Design

-Recycling/Composting and Waste Reduction

-Reacability, Supply Chain, and Procurement

-Greenhous Gas/Carbon Management

-Social Compliance

-Employee Engagement

Minimum Knowledge, Skills and Ability requirements:

Bachelor’s or Graduate Degree Program related to Sustainability, Environmental Science, or Environmental Engineering

Must be able perform data set analysis with advanced data management skills preferred

Creative thinking and a passion for innovation

Broad understanding of the fundamentals of key environmental and social issues with the ability to remain up-to-date on new and emerging technologies

Strong communication, research, and data skills

Highly organized, self-starter and ability to work with various levels within an organization

Ability to work independently and collaboratively, must adapt well to change and be able to prioritize multiple aspects of his or her project(s)

Advanced PC skills: Word, Excel, and PowerPoint. Experience with Scope 5, SoFi, Accuvio or other environmental database /management tool base is desired.

Duration & Location:

  • This is a 6 month position that will start immediately, option to be full or part-time for the right candidate
  • Monday – Friday 8:30am – 4:30pm
  • Position is located at our corporate headquarters in Lakeville, MA (about 45 minutes South of Boston and East of Providence – Exit 5 off of Rte I-495)
Please submit your resume and a summary letter (no more than 1 page) to communicate your interest in the position to sustainability@oceanspray.com or https://oceanspray.csod.com/ats/careersite/JobDetails.aspx?site=1&id=2321
Deadline to Apply: January 14, 2018
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