Posts by: Amy LaVertu

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The wait is *finally* over! Those of us who longed all winter for one more bite of just-picked lettuce or sweet-as-candy strawberries can finally rejoice and put back that bag of frozen broccoli crowns. Farmers markets  and the World PEAS community-support agriculture program (CSA) are back!!

Besides the miracle of fresh, locally-grown  produce, those of us who live and work in downtown Boston can also enjoy the convenience of picking up fresh food at farmers markets that are nearly around the corner every day of the week.  Even more convenient, is the World PEAS CSA, which drops off farm shares right in the Jaharis Building of the Friedman School!

So, lettuce begin a new season of yum ;-)! Check out some of the following farmers markets close to the Tufts health science campus and learn more about the World PEAS community-support agriculture program (CSA).

World PEAS CSA program
Location : Pick-up in the Jaharis Building of the Friedman School
Dates & Times:  Tuesdays between 3:30 – 6:30 pm.

Boston Public Market Farmers’ Market
136 Blackstone Street-Indoors on the ground floor above the Haymarket MBTA Station
Dates & Times: year-round – Wednesday to Sunday 8:00 am – 8:00 pm; WIC & Senior Coupons Accepted; EBT-SNAP Accepted

Boston Public Market/Greenway Farmers’ Market
136 Blackstone Street-Plaza
Dates & Times: May 18 to November 16 – Wednesday 11:00 am – 6:00 pm; WIC & Senior Coupons Accepted; EBT-SNAP Accepted

Boston/Boston University Farmers’ Market
775 Commonwealth Ave.-Boston University
Dates & Times: September to October 27 – Thursday 11:00 am – 3:00 pm; WIC & Senior Coupons Accepted;

Boston/Copley Square Farmers’ Market
206 Clarendon St-Along St. James Ave. Dartmouth and Boylston St
Dates & Times: May 10 to November 22 – Tuesday and Friday 11:00 am to 6:00 pm; WIC & Senior Coupons Accepted; EBT-SNAP Accepted

Boston/South End at the Ink Block Farmers’ Market
375 Harrison Ave.-
Dates & Times: May 1 to October 30 – Sunday 10:00 am – 4:00 pm; WIC & Senior Coupons Accepted;

Boston/South Station/Dewey Square Farmers’ Market
Summer St & Atlantic Ave-Dewey Square across from South Station
Dates & Times: May 17 to November 22 – Tuesday and Thursday 11:30 am – 6:30 pm (11:30 am – 6:00 pm in November); WIC & Senior Coupons Accepted; EBT-SNAP Accepted

Boston/SOWA Farmers’ Market
500 Harrison Ave.
Dates & Times: May 3 to October 25 – Sunday 10:00 am – 4:00 pm; ;

Find more farmers markets near  you on the Massgrown Map . Want to know what’s in season, take a look at the Massachusetts-Grown Produce Availability  chart.

 

Image credit:Author: Jane Fresco Source: http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Image:Colorfull.jp.  This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 License.

 

It’s Bike Week! May 14 – May 22, 2016
Post by Amy Lapidow

bike_week

May 14 – May 22, 2016 is Bike Week here in MA. The only state to have such!

What happens on bike week? Events to promote human powered transportation, including a free breakfast at City Hall on Friday!  Find an event near you at: www.baystatebikeweek.com

Interested in a road race, to watch or to participate? www.bikereg.com . There is an event calendar with everything you need to know (including the route), plus links to websites and registration information.

Not into racing, just want to know where there are bike routes? Try https://bikenewengland.com/ subscribe for current info, or get free access to vintage cue sheets.

It can be dangerous to bike in the city. I know I do it everyday. Learn the rules and be safe: http://www.bostonbikes.org/urbancycling  or http://bicyclesafeboston.com/

Don’t have a bike? Not to worry, rent one! https://www.thehubway.com/  There is a hubway station at the Chinatown gate and across from The New England School of Law at Stuart and Charles St. South. The first 30 mins are FREE!

Want discounts for riding a bike? Get a sticker for your helmet at: http://bb2.bicyclebenefits.org/#/home

We’re celebrating Bike Week here at Hirsh too. If you stop by the Library Service Desk and show us your helmet this Wednesday 5/18, we’ll give you a granola bar!

Get out and ride!

Image: http://aaronkuehn.com/art/bicycle-typogram

 

passover

This Saturday, April 30th, marks the end of Passover, the eight-day festival that commemorates the ancient exodus of the Jewish from slavery in Egypt to freedom under Moses leadership. Passover, or Pesach in Hebrew, is celebrated from the 15th through the 22nd of the month of Nissan according to the Jewish calendar. As a lunar calendar, the dates of Passover vary in relation to the Gregorian calendar.

Jewish communities throughout the world mark Passover with the eating of matzo, unleavened bread that calls to mind the when the Jewish people fled from Egypt in such haste that they could not wait for bread to rise, and with the holding of the Seder meal. The rituals of the Seder meal are proscribed by the Haggadah, a text that sets forth the elements of the Seder and relays stories of G-d’s steadfastness and saving works on behalf of the Jewish people. During the Seder meal, the story of the exodus from Egypt is retold, and symbolic foods are served. Families and friends come together to share the Seder meal and celebrate their ancestors in faith.

During these final days of Passover, we wish you Pesach Sameach – or Happy Passover!

Want to learn more about Passover? Check out these resources:

Passover, the most beloved Jewish holiday (Religion News Service)
http://religionnews.com/2016/04/22/passover-the-most-beloved-jewish-holiday/

Why Is This Passover Different From Past Passovers? (NPR)
http://www.npr.org/sections/goatsandsoda/2016/04/22/475128102/why-is-this-passover-different-from-past-passovers

The Passover Table – Delicious recipes for your Seder table and beyond (The New York Times)
http://cooking.nytimes.com/topics/passover

Top 5 Passover Traditions From Around The World (Huffington Post)
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2009/04/08/top-5-passover-traditions_n_184209.html

Beauty in Holiness – Hebraic Collections: An Illustrated Guide (Library of Congress)
https://www.loc.gov/rr/amed/guide/hs-beauty.html

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Image: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Sedertable.jpg via Creative Commons

 

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Zika virus. The lead crisis in Flint, Michigan. Soaring rates of childhood obesity. Climate change.

These are just some of the headlines we encounter every day that remind us of how  critical a robust and resilient public health infrastructure is for our future.

This week is National Public Health Week 2016 (http://www.nphw.org/). An initiative of the American Public Health Association (http://www.apha.org/), National Public Health Week was established to “as a time to recognize the contributions of public health and highlight issues that are important to improving our nation.”

In honor of National Public Health Week, the Hirsh library would like to highlight its resources that help support public health. The Hirsh library is also presenting a Public Health Tools Workshop that will introduce you to resources to help you with public and community health-related research, including Healthy People 2020, APHA Public Health Policy Database and TRoPHI (Trials Register of Promoting Health Interventions).

We hope that you will attend the workshop or check out our public health research guides. After all,  public health is your health!

Public Health Tools Workshop
When: Wednesday, April 6, 2016 4:00pm – 5:00pm & Friday, April 8, 2016 9:00am- 10am
Where: Sackler 510
Register at: http://bit.ly/1RW0SjX

Public & Community Health Research Guide
http://researchguides.library.tufts.edu/public_health
This guide contains resources to help you with public and community health-related research.

Boston to Mound Bayou: Columbia Point & Delta Health Center
http://researchguides.library.tufts.edu/community_health
This guide has been created to help you learn more about Tufts University’s archival materials regarding the establishment of the Columbia Point Health Center (Boston, MA) and Delta Health Center, Inc. (Mound Bayou, MS), which helped launch the community health center movement.

Environmental & Occupational Health
http://researchguides.library.tufts.edu/EnvOccHealth
Presents a variety of resources focused on environmental and occupational health.

 

superhero

It’s that time again! The end of the semester is nigh and with it research projects, final exams and group assignments are looming. Feeling overwhelmed? Desperate? Don’t know where how or where to start? The Hirsh Library’s librarian Liaison Program can help!

The Hirsh Library’s Liaison Program provides a ‘point-person’ for the academic programs and clinical departments on the Tufts’ health sciences campus. What can your librarian liaison do for you?

For starters, your librarian liaison can help you:

  • identify resources for your particular topic, especially resources beyond article databases
  • create effective and efficient search strategies for databases like PubMed and Web of Science
  • discern what tool is right for you to help manage your citations (i.e., EndNote, Zotero, Mendeley) and providing instructions to get you started
  • track down statistical data for research projects and help you manage your own data

Sounds pretty great, right? It is! Now, go find out who’s you librarian liaison and then get in touch with them!

Liaison Program
http://hirshlibrary.tufts.edu/research/liaison-program

And one more thing – if you are preparing for dental, medical or physician assistance board exams, then you must check out the following Hirsh Library guides:

 

Image: https://thenounproject.com/term/superhero/47480/ via Creative Commons BY-NC-SA 3.0.

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COS Easter Vigil 100403_006

This Sunday is the great feast of Easter, the high point of the Christian calendar (nb: Eastern Orthodox Christians will celebrate Easter on Sunday, May 1). Easter celebrates the resurrection of Jesus Christ and ends the season of Lent, which began on February 10.

The final week of Lent is called “Holy Week” and the three days preceding Easter are referred to the “Holy Triduum,”  which consists of Maundy Thursday, Good Friday and Holy Saturday. These three days  which recount the final three days of Jesus’ life are marked by Christians around the world by religious observances, fasting,  pilgrimages, and acts of repentance.

Ending this intense period of devotion is the  Great Vigil on the eve of Easter. Christian communities around the world celebrate Easter Sunday with grand religious processions, the giving of small gifts, and feasts with family and friends. If you are celebrating Easter, we wish a  most joyous feast!

Learn more about the “Holy Week” and Easter:

 

Image credit: Calvin Institute of Christian Worship via Creative Commons BY-NC-SA 3.0.

 

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Having begun this Monday (February 8), celebrations marking Year of the Monkey will continue for the next two weeks. Often referred to as “Chinese New Year”, the Lunar New Year is celebrated throughout Asia. In Vietnam, Lunar New Year is celebrate as Tết.

Animals from the Chinese zodiac are associated with each new year.. This year is the Year of the Monkey. The Chinese zodiac has a 12 year cycle, so the next  Year of the Monkey will be in 2028.

Fireworks, feasts, family reunions and parades are some of the well-known festivities associated with the Lunar New Year. However, there are a great many traditions associated with the Lunar New Year that are centuries old, such as the hanging of traditional ‘new years’ poems, cleaning the home, the receiving new clothes and getting one’s haircut.

If you are celebrating Lunar New Year, we wish safe travels and  much joy and prosperity this year! 恭贺新禧  Happy New Year!

Learn more about Lunar New Year:

Lunar New Year 2016: Facts, Dates, And Ancient Traditions (Huffington Post)

Stories about Chinese New Year (NPR.org)

Lunar New Year in pictures (BBC.com)

 

Photo credit: Poa Mosyuen, used with permission under Creative Commons license

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Still need a new year’s resolution? How about resolving to make 2016 the year to enhance your research skills? We can help you with that!

The Hirsh Library’s Open Workshop series will provide you with the tips and tricks you need to get the most of the research process.

Open workshops are held in  on Wednesdays from 4-5pm and then repeated on Fridays from 9-10am. All workshops are held in Sackler 510.

Registration for January workshops is now open!

PubMed: the Basics
January 13 & 15
March 16 & 18
April 13 & 15

BaSiCSss for TUSDM 2nd & 3rd  Year Students
January 20 & 22

EndNote: the Basics
January 27 & 29
March 23 & 25

Thesis/Capstone/ALE Boot Camp Month!
February 3 & 5 – Intro to the Literature Review
February 10 & 12 – Tools to Manage Writing
February 17 & 19 – Citation Tool Overview
February 24 & 26  – Using Images

Database Crash Course!
March 2 & 4

Systematic Reviews: Laying the Groundwork
March 9 & 11
April 27 & 29

Web of Science & Scopus
March 30
April 1

Public Health Tools (Public Health Week 2016)
April 6 & 8

Mendeley: the Basics
 April 20 & 22

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It’s almost here, that brief, magical time of year when you can read for pleasure!

While we’re sure that there are some transcendent passages to be found in Fundamentals of Operative Dentistry or Principles of Biostatistics, we also suspect that at this point you can’t wait to tuck into any book that does not mention the word “prevalence” once!

The Staff here at Hirsh would like to help you pick out a book to indulge in over break or for a just right gift for the book lover in your life. Without further ado, here are some Hirsh staff picks.

Happy reading!

First, a few good stories:

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 PC Peter Grant Book Series by Ben Aaronovitch  (recommended by Amy)

“In a city with a thriving supernatural community, including river gods, dryads and fairies, narrator and PC Peter Grant works for the London Metropolitan Police. He’s also an apprentice wizard and he, along with PC Lesley May and DCI Thomas Nightingale, the last registered wizard in England, comprises the Folly, the Met’s supernatural department  — they’re known as Isaacs after their founder, Sir Isaac Newton.”

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Girl at War  by Sara Novic (recommended by Stephanie)

“Zagreb, summer of 1991. Ten-year-old Ana Jurić is a carefree tomboy who runs the streets of Croatia’s capital with her best friend, Luka, takes care of her baby sister, Rahela, and idolizes her father. But as civil war breaks out across Yugoslavia, soccer games and school lessons are supplanted by sniper fire and air raid drills. When tragedy suddenly strikes, Ana is lost to a world of guerilla warfare and child soldiers; a daring escape plan to America becomes her only chance for survival.

Ten years later Ana is a college student in New York. She’s been hiding her past from her boyfriend, her friends, and most especially herself. Haunted by the events that forever changed her family, she returns alone to Croatia, where she must rediscover the place that was once her home and search for the ghosts of those she’s lost.”

kafka

Kafka on the Shore by Haruki Murakami (recommended by Stephen)

“A tour de force of metaphysical reality, it is powered by two remarkable characters: a teenage boy, Kafka Tamura, who runs away from home either to escape a gruesome oedipal prophecy or to search for his long-missing mother and sister; and an aging simpleton called Nakata, who never recovered from a wartime affliction and now is drawn toward Kafka for reasons that, like the most basic activities of daily life, he cannot fathom. Their odyssey, as mysterious to them as it is to us, is enriched throughout by vivid accomplices and mesmerizing events.”

Life After Life

Life After Life by Kate Atkinson (recommended by Laura)

On a cold and snowy night in 1910, Ursula Todd is born, the third child of a wealthy English banker and his wife. Sadly, she dies before she can draw her first breath. On that same cold and snowy night, Ursula Todd is born, lets out a lusty wail, and embarks upon a life that will be, to say the least, unusual. For as she grows, she also dies, repeatedly, in any number of ways. Clearly history (and Kate Atkinson) have plans for her: In Ursula rests nothing less than the fate of civilization. Wildly inventive, darkly comic, startlingly poignant — this is Kate Atkinson at her absolute best, playing with time and history, telling a story that is breathtaking for both its audacity and its endless satisfactions.”

Ordinary Grace

Ordinary Grace by William Kent Krueger (recommended by Jane)

“On the surface, Ordinary Grace is the story of the murder of a beautiful young woman, a beloved daughter and sister. At heart, it’s the story of what that tragedy does to a boy, his family, and ultimately the fabric of the small town in which he lives. Told from Frank’s perspective forty years after that fateful summer, it is a moving account of a boy standing at the door of his young manhood, trying to understand a world that seems to be falling apart around him. It is an unforgettable novel about discovering the terrible price of wisdom and the enduring grace of God.”

And, for you non-fiction fans, check out these books:

The Boys in the Boat

The Boys in the Boat: Nine Americans and Their Epic Quest for Gold at the 1936 Berlin Olympics by Daniel James Brown (recommended by Laura)

“Daniel James Brown’s robust book tells the story of the University of Washington’s 1936 eight-oar crew and their epic quest for an Olympic gold medal, a team that transformed the sport and grabbed the attention of millions of Americans. The sons of loggers, shipyard workers, and farmers, the boys defeated elite rivals first from eastern and British universities and finally the German crew rowing for Adolf Hitler in the Olympic games in Berlin, 1936.”

View from the center

The View from the Center of the Universe: Discovering Our Extraordinary Place in the Cosmos by Joel R. Primack, Nancy Ellen Abrams (recommended by the “other Amy”)

“A world-renowned astrophysicist and a science philosopher present a new, scientifically supported understanding of the universe, one that will forever change our personal relationship with the cosmos.  For four hundred years, since early scientists discovered that the universe did not revolve around the earth, people have felt cut off-adrift in a meaningless cosmos. That is about to change. In their groundbreaking new book, The View from the Center of the Universe, Joel R. Primack, Ph.D., one of the world’s leading cosmologists, and Nancy Ellen Abrams, a philosopher and writer, use recent advances in astronomy,physics, and cosmology to frame a compelling new theory of how to understand the universe and our role in it.”

the kitchn

The Kitchn Cookbook: Recipes, Kitchens & Tips to Inspire Your Cooking by Sara Kate Gillingham-Ryan (recommended by the “other Amy”)

“From Apartment Therapy’s cooking site, The Kitchn, comes 150 recipes and a cooking school with 50 essential lessons, as well as a guide to organizing your kitchen–plus storage tips, tool reviews, inspiration from real kitchens, maintenance suggestions, 200 photographs, and much more.”

 

 

DCMinyan_Hanukkah

This Sunday (December 6) at sundown (that’d be approximately 4:11pm) marks the first night of Hanukkah, an eight-day Jewish holiday, also known as the “festival of lights.” Hanukkah  commemorates the re-dedication of the holy temple in Jerusalem following the Maccabean Revolt against the Seleucid Empire in the year 2nd century B.C.E.

Jewish communities around the world celebrate Hanukkah by spending time with family and friends, lighting menorahs, partaking in the dreidel game and enjoying delectable treats, such as latkes, doughnuts, and kugels.
Want to learn more about Hanukkah? Check out the following resources:

The Revolt of the Maccabees: The True Story Behind Hanukkah (Haaretz Newspaper)
http://www.haaretz.com/jewish/features/.premium-1.630770

Hanukkah Lights: Stories of the Season (National Public Radio)
http://www.npr.org/series/hanukkah-lights/

Hanukkah Recipes (The New York Times)
http://cooking.nytimes.com/tag/hanukkah

How to Play The Dreidel Game (video)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iS24dsLTuW0

Image source: DCMinyan_Hanukkah.JPG/Creative Commons

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