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Screenshot of Access Physiotherapy website

You now have full access to the following two physiotherapy collections from McGraw-Hill Medical: the AccessPhysiotherapy and F.A. Davis PT Collection. These collections include clinical textbooks, cases, and review preps:

“AccessPhysiotherapy (APT) is an online medical resource that provides students with the tools they need to excel in basic and advanced studies and crucial test prep. APT provides students and residents with interactive content, self-assessment, and leading medical texts to enhance decision-making at the point-of-care. It allows for practicing physical therapists to brush up on their medical knowledge to ensure best patient outcomes.”

 

Screenshot of F.A. Davis Physiotherapy collection

“The F.A. Davis PT Collection on AccessPhysiotherapy is the most comprehensive digital subscription product on the market for educators and physical therapy students. This partnership between F.A. Davis and McGraw-Hill Education brings you a comprehensive online PT resource that covers the entire spectrum of physical therapy–for viewing on any device.”

Meescan logo

Need to check out a physical book? We have an app for that! Download meeScan (available on Google Play or iTunes) to check out books when you’re at Hirsh Library. All you need to do once you download the app is log in with your Tufts username and password (please note: you must be physically in the library in order to log in). After finding a book in our collection, tap the plus sign (+) and scan the Tufts Library book barcode to check out the book. If you are affiliated with Tufts Medical Center (TMC), the barcode on the back of your TMC ID will also work to log into the app. If you do not have a barcode, please contact us and we will be able to set you up with an account and barcode.

 

New England Journal of Medicine Race and Medicine webpage

 

The New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) has recently created a topic page which highlights select articles dealing with race and medicine. The articles have been pulled together with the hope of improving research, public health, patient care and professional training:

“The Race and Medicine collection reflects NEJM’s commitment to understanding and combating racism as a public health and human rights crisis. Our commitment to antiracism includes efforts to educate the medical community about systemic racism, to support Black and other minority physicians and aspiring physicians, and ultimately to improve the care and lives of Black and other minority patients” (NEJM, 2020, para. 1).

Additionally, the NEJM is cosponsoring four webinars in the virtual series, The Impact of Skin Color and Ethnicity on Clinical Diagnosis and Research, which will run from October 28–December 2. The topic of the first webinar is Structural Racism and Racial Bias in Medicine, and will take place on Wednesday, October 28 from 1:00-2:15 PM ET. Registration is available here.

Race and Medicine webinar

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Boo!

Leo and Theo skeletons dressed in costumes

Photo: Tom Quinn. Pirate bedazzling: Whitney Stannard.

Okay, now that I have your attention: welcome to October, the month of horror movies! “But Tom,” you say, “what can I watch that won’t break the bank?” Well, I have some good news for you, and it will come free with your being part of Tufts: Kanopy!

Kanopy is a streaming service that Tufts subscribes to, and you therefore have access to at no extra cost. There are a ton of interesting documentaries, indie films, and movies from around the world on there, but right now I am here to talk about some good old fashioned horror films that you can watch for free (which I will keep reminding you of). And you can watch it on your laptop, phone, or even cast it to your TV, so it’s nice and convenient too

Note: every single link below will lead you to a listing on Kanopy unless otherwise noted. But a link is not an automatic endorsement – this is just a cross-section of somewhat famous movies, some of which you may have heard of, others you may not have. If I think highly of a particular film, I will note it in the description.

Older School Horror

Let’s say you’re like me, and one of the things you’re always curious about is where horror movies really started taking hold. What would you guess? Hitchcock, perhaps, with Psycho? Well, that’s 1960, and he did Dial M for Murder in 1954. So maybe even earlier? What if I told you that The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari is a crazy psychological horror film from 1919? Or that Nosferatu is an unsettling vampire movie from 1922? Nosferatu, by the way, was a super unauthorized adaptation of Bram Stoker’s book Dracula, and the vampire design stands strong in the pantheon of frankly terrifying looking monsters.

But hey, maybe silent films aren’t your thing. That’s cool! Not everyone is into them. What about something like Black Sabbath from 1963 (no, not the band, although they’re excellent too). It’s a horror anthology starring Boris Karloff! Or 1964’s The Last Man on Earth starring Vincent Price, based on the book I Am Legend? Or, heck, speaking of Vincent Price, why not give House on Haunted Hill a shot?

I would be remiss if I didn’t end this section with Black Christmas. It’s not the first slasher film (arguably, that could be Psycho), but it laid the groundwork for the behemoths that would come after, like Halloween, Friday the 13th, Nightmare on Elm Street, and Scream. So worth a watch if you’re into slashers!

Zombies and Creepy Towns Oh My

Let’s just get this out there: George Romero is King of the Modern Zombie. Every single zombie movie or TV show you have seen owes itself to Romero’s legacy, and particularly his startling debut Night of the Living Dead. In 97 minutes, in stark black and white, all filmed on the outskirts of Pittsburgh in a single house, Night of the Living Dead is, somehow, more than you’re ready for, even if you’ve watched all 157 seasons of The Walking Dead. And hey, if you’re on a Romero kick, why not check out Day of the Dead while you’re there? It’s the 3rd of his original Dead trilogy, and the opening song got sampled by The Gorillaz for their track “M1A1” off their debut album. Talk about legacy.

If you’d prefer “creepy town with murderers,” there’s always The Hills Have Eyes, from legend Wes Craven (who younger members of the audience may recognize from Scream fame). Incidentally, if you like that, The Hills Have Eyes Part 2 is also on Kanopy.

Time to Laugh

Okay, that last section got heavy. Let’s get goofy. Tucker & Dale vs Evil is a send up of the slasher genre, particularly the “cabin the woods” type (like Friday the 13th). It’s a combination of “weekend fishing trip gone wrong” and “slasher flick,” and is a lot of fun for it. There is also the amazing What We Do in the Shadows, directed by Taika Waititi. This answers the question “what if vampires of different styles all lived in a house together as roommates in the modern era?” and answered it so well that there’s now a follow-up show with 2 seasons under its belt. I think I’ve watched each of these two movies twice now, and plan to watch them more. Indicidentally, Taika has two other movies on there: Boy and the heartwarming Hunt for the Wilderpeople. (If his name sounds familiar but you can’t place it: recently, he directed Thor: Ragnarock, and Jojo Rabbit. These are all from before that).

Although this one isn’t strictly a comedy, The Blob is a 1959 movie starring a teenage Steve McQueen, about a gelatinous blob that somehow terrorizes a town. Which feels like it’s got a great comedic vibe to it by today’s standards, you know?

Let’s Get Weird

Okay. Maybe the other stuff isn’t really your vibe. What if it’s the kind of horror movie filled with tension and weirdness? Like 1977’s Suspiria, directed by Italian master of horror Dario Argento? It was recently re-imagined (which might be where you recognize the name from), but this movie about a ballerina getting caught up in a dance company run by an evil witch still hits strong. Or perhaps Enemy, where Jake Gyllenhall plays both a minor movie actor and the stranger who looks identical to him, and ends up stalking him? Maybe Scanners, which is David Cronenberg’s movie about people who can explode heads. Or you could always check out David Lynch’s Eraserhead, which is pure David Lynch weirdness.

Of course, for some very modern and recent weirdness, you could always watch 2019’s The Lighthouse, starring Willem Dafoe, Robert Pattinson, crazy facial hair, and crazier accents. And yes, that Robert Pattinson.

A24

Fun fact: the director of The Lighthouse also directed 2016’s The Witch, both of which were produced by A24, a studio with a strong showing on Kanopy. But I give them their own section because of some other movies of theirs you may recognize: Hereditary and Midsommar are both from the studio, as is Green Room. Go give their entire catalog a look, but here’s a link to their horror offerings.

 

At the end of the day, you’re the only person who knows what you’ll want to watch. But please know, I’m not even scratching the surface of Kanopy‘s offerings – they have 414 films listed under Horror & Thriller, which means if you started today and watched 1 per day you’d finish on November 30, 2021. And that’s assuming they don’t add more (which, come on, of course they will).

So. You have access to a treasure trove of free movies, and this is the season for horror. Go to the JumboSearch listing for Kanopy, follow the link out to the site, sign in using your Tufts username & password, and really make this month work for you! Five minutes worth of work for a ton of entertainment, and not a single extra dime spent. Aside from the popcorn you’ll need, but you’re on your own for that.

Spookily yours,
Tom

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Screenshot of Access Medicine Case Files Collection webpage

The Case Files Collection from Access Medicine has recently had a number of updates, which makes this a good time to review this useful resource. With cases from Basic Science, Clinical Rotation, and Post-Graduate, the collection now includes Case Files Podcasts found in the global navigation bar under “Podcasts/Audio.” They are produced by the primary author of the series, Dr. Eugene C. Toy, MD and highlight key concepts from the cases found in the collection in short downloadable episodes.

Below is an overview of the Case Files series if you are not familiar with the collection:Case Files Info

Here are the direct links to our catalog for each subject in the collection:

Book cover of So You Want to Talk About Race

Here is a quick update on newly acquired eBooks that are now ready for use. A mixed bag of valuable and important titles which needed to be highlighted. Hope there is one that interests you. As always, if there is a book we don’t have that you think should be in our collection, please let us know by recommending a purchase.

 

So You Want to Talk About Race

Food Policy in the United States: An Introduction (2nd Edition)

Grammar Smart

Statistics at Square One

50 Studies Every Neurologist Should Know

Debating Cancer : The Paradox in Cancer Research

 

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Screenshot of the textbook Nutritional Epidemiology on the Oxford platform

 

Hello everyone!

We hope you are well, staying safe, and healthy out there. Below is another set of newly acquired electronic books that are now ready for use. This list focuses on Nutrition reserve titles. Please take notice of the Public Notes that are under the platform link in JumboSearch, as they will provide you with important access information.

 

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Hello everyone!

We have been tirelessly going through the course reserve books to find any remaining titles that are available electronically which we have not already acquired. I will be posting these new eBooks with direct links to the catalog here for your convenience. This first list covers MPH reserve books. Please take notice of the Public Notes that are under the platform link in JumboSearch, as they will provide you with important access information.

 

ADVANCES IN HEALTH CARE ORGANIZATION THEORY

DESIGNING CLINICAL RESEARCH

DESIGNING HEALTHY COMMUNITIES

DIFFUSION OF INNOVATIONS

ELEMENTS OF STYLE 2020

EMERGING PERSPECTIVES IN HEALTH COMMUNICATION: MEANING, CULTURE, AND POWER

EPIDEMIOLOGY: AN INTRODUCTION

ESSENTIALS OF ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH

GIS AND PUBLIC HEALTH

GIS TUTORIAL FOR HEALTH

HEALTH CARE ECONOMICS

MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY: A SHORT COURSE

MODERN EPIDEMIOLOGY

ON WRITING: A MEMOIR OF THE CRAFT

ONE HEALTH: SCIENCE, POLITICS AND ZOONOTIC DISEASE IN AFRICA

PRINCIPLES OF BIOSTATISTICS

SPEAKING CULTURALLY: EXPLORATIONS IN SOCIAL COMMUNICATION

SURVEY METHODOLOGY

WATERSHED RESEARCH TRADITIONS IN HUMAN COMMUNICATION THEORY

WOE IS I: THE GRAMMARPHOBE’S GUIDE TO BETTER ENGLISH IN PLAIN ENGLISH

 

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We can’t have enough e-resources in times like these. Here is a list of the latest e-Books that have been added to our collection. These 2020 editions and recent releases are all available to you now from AccessMedicine and R2. Stay safe out there!

 

The big picture physiology : Medical course & step 1 review | 2020 edition

Current diagnosis & treatment : Pediatrics | 25th edition

Current practice guidelines in primary care | 2020 edition

Current diagnosis & treatment surgery | 15th edition

Review of medical microbiology & immunology : A guide to clinical infectious diseases

Clinical neuroanatomy | 29th edition

Infectious diseases : a clinical short course | 4th edition

Graber and Wilbur’s family medicine examination & board review | 5th edition

Promoting Child And Adolescent Mental Health

International nutrition : Achieving millennium goals and beyond

 

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Happy 2020!

Each January brings an array of welcome changes…maybe you’re giving that whole Dry January thing a try (which might decrease alcohol consumption later in the year), or it’s a Whole30 for you, or maybe this is the year you run that marathon, since that new study in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology shows that those training for their first marathon may experience a reduction in vascular age.

But why do any of that when you can simply revel in the Medline Data Changes for 2020! Cheers!

So what sort of changes does 2020 bring to Medical Subject Headings?

97 terms were changed or deleted and replaced with current terminology (for example, Swaziland is now Eswatini, reflecting the official name change of the nation in 2018).

293 new MeSH headings and 2 new publication types joined the thesaurus this year as well. Some new headings of particular note to HHSL researchers include:

You can review the full list here: https://www.nlm.nih.gov/mesh/2020/download/2020NewMeSHheadingsSingleColumn.pdf.

For more information about using MeSH, please visit our guide to Advanced Searching Techniques.

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