Posts by: Katherine Morley

We hope you all had a restful and rewarding winter break! Whether you’ve been back to the grind for a few weeks or are just starting your semester today, it’s the perfect time to refresh your memory about our librarian liaison program.

The Hirsh Library Liaison Program provides a “point person” for each of the academic programs and clinical departments on the Tufts’ health sciences campus.

What can a librarian liaison do for you? For starters, your librarian liaison can help you:

  • identify resources for your particular topic, especially resources beyond article databases
  • create effective and efficient search strategies for databases like PubMed and Web of Science
  • discern what tool is right for you to help manage your citations (i.e., EndNote, Zotero, Mendeley) and providing instructions to get you started
  • track down statistical data for research projects and help you manage your own data

Visit our Liaison Program page to find out who the librarian liaison is for your program and get in touch with them!

In observance of Martin Luther King Jr Day, we will be operating with a modified schedule on Monday, January 21st. The Library Service Desk will be open from 12pm-7pm and the Library Offices will be closed. We will be open for our usual hours on Saturday and Sunday. Stay warm and have a great long weekend!

We need your help! We want to test how usable our library catalog, JumboSearch, is and we’re looking for some student volunteers to give us feedback. We will be hosting 30-minute usability testing sessions on January 23rd and 30th. Those who participate in a session will receive $10 in JumboCash as a thank you! If you’d like to join the pool of volunteers we draw from, just fill out this form.

If you’re not a student but are interested in helping us out, keep your eyes peeled! We will be hosting sessions for other groups in the future.

Thanks!

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January is National Soup Month, at least, it is according to the good people at Campbell’s, and we feel like they know a thing or two about soup. And here at the Hirsh Health Sciences Library, we know a bit about soup, too.

For example, according to this article published in The Nurse Practitioner, there may just be something to the idea that chicken soup is a valid treatment for the common cold. According to this paper, it provides relief from symptoms and decreases the inflammatory response related to viral illness- in other words, chicken soup might actually make you feel better when you’re sick. SCIENCE!

Cure for the Common Cold? (courtesy University of Washington Libraries. Digital Collections: http://content.lib.washington.edu/u?/kiehl,360)

Cure for the Common Cold?
(courtesy University of Washington Libraries. Digital Collections: http://content.lib.washington.edu/u?/kiehl,360)

Regardless of its efficacy, who doesn’t like a hot bowl of soup in the winter, regardless of whether you’re under the weather? Research and Instruction Librarian Jane recommended this pot of Fire Roasted Tomato Soup for a yummy meal. If you’re looking for a weekend project (it is supposed to be quite chilly), make someone’s day with a labor-intensive batch of delicious Chicken Matzo Ball Soup (aka Jewish Penicillin). For vegetarians/vegans/spicy food lovers, this Lentil and Coconut Soup with Cilantro-Habanero Gremolata is delicious and cheap to make. It also makes enough soup to freeze for the next time you feel the sniffles coming on.

There’s a proverb (of Spanish or Portuguese origin, apparently) that states: “Of soup and love, the first is best.” We offer no opinion on the matter, but wish you a wonderful National Soup Month.

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Image source: https://pixabay.com/en/pole-clock-snow-outside-winter-2603564/

The end of the semester is finally within reach! With the holidays now upon us, Hirsh Library will be operating with modified hours from Friday, December 21st through Tuesday, January 1st. The full schedule is as follows:

Friday, December 21st: 7:45am-5pm

Saturday, December 22nd-Tuesday, December 25th: Closed

Wednesday, December 26th-Friday, December 28th: 7:45am-5pm

Saturday, December 29th-Tuesday, January 1st: Closed

We will reopen for regular hours at 7:45am on Wednesday, January 2nd. 

Best wishes for a happy and healthy new year from all of us here at Hirsh!

 

Torn between taking a break to make a craft or to eat a snack? This week you’re in luck! Stop by the Library Service Desk this Thursday 12/6 and Friday 12/7 starting at 1pm and create an architectural masterpiece with graham crackers, frosting, and a bunch of candy.

And to make this week even sweeter, we’re also welcoming Paws for People back on Thursday from 3-5pm! Stop by the room behind the cafe on Sackler 4 and relax with some therapy dogs and guinea pigs. But please don’t share your gingerbread house with them!

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Look, we know it’s a BEAR of a time right now…exams, assignments, travel, holidays…

…luckily, we’re here to help! However, remember that when you’re busy, we’re busy. Don’t get shut out in the cold, PLAN AHEAD!

Leave plenty of time to snag the books and other resources you need to study for exams (and don’t forget to bring them back on time and avoid The Block!).

If you’d like to work with a librarian, you are always welcome to stop by the Service Desk on Sackler 4, but to avoid lines and waiting, why don’t you schedule an appointment with your liaison librarian? Just find the librarian dedicated to your school or program and book an appointment by clicking on a librarian’s name and then clicking the “Schedule Appointment” button.

Need an appointment in a hurry? Fill out the Schedule a Consultation form and we’ll be in touch ASAP. Appointments are available Monday -Friday, 8 am to 5 pm, as schedules permit.

Thanksgiving break is here at last, which means Hirsh will be going on a short break next week too! We will close at 2pm on Wednesday, November 21st and will re-open for our regular hours on Sunday, November 25th at 12pm.

Here’s a full breakdown of next week’s schedule:

Monday 11/19:  7:45am-11:00pm (regular hours)

Tuesday 11/20:  7:45am-11:00pm (regular hours)

Wednesday 11/21: 7:45am-2pm

Thursday 11/22: Closed

Friday 11/23: Closed

Saturday 11/24: Closed

Sunday 11/25: 12-10pm (regular hours)

We hope you all have a very happy and healthy Thanksgiving!

TheGobbleGang

It’s our favorite time of year! Yes, that’s right. It’s turkey time!

Starting at 12pm this Thursday 11/15 and Friday 11/16, you can stop by the Library Service Desk and create your own feathered friend to bring home to Mom (or back to your study carrel). We’ll have a variety of materials out so you can create anything your heart desires, from the simple and majestic hand turkey (our personal favorite) to some 3D  pinecone poultry.

 

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You’ve probably heard the term open access – maybe it’s the reason you were able to get the full text of that article you needed?  Maybe it’s the reason so many people read your latest article?

Open access (OA) is about making research literature freely available on the Internet with few copyright or license restrictions.  In honor of Open Access Week (happening right now!), here are the top 10 reasons to publish OA…

10ImproveDiscoverability

10. Improve discoverability

Open articles commonly show up more places than just the publisher’s website, for example, in subject repositories or ResearchGate or the Tufts Digital Library, and therefore can more readily be found by search engines and through web surfing, not just through traditional articles databases, like PubMed or Web of Science. In addition, search engines can more readily crawl the entire full text of open articles, beyond just the citation information and abstract.

9EnlargeReadership

9. Enlarge readership

Since open access materials can be easier to find and the full text is available to all, more people are likely to read them.  You didn’t spend all that time on research and writing to lock away your findings, did you?

8DiversifyReadership

8. Diversify readership 

Those who have access to paid journal subscriptions represent a limited demographic that does not necessarily correlate to those who will most benefit from and contribute to the research. Removing paywalls removes these misguided filters on readership.

7IncreaseCitations

7. Increase citation numbers

 Many times, open articles have the opportunity to be cited more by others due to their increased visibility. In addition, since they are often available ahead-of-print, citations can start accumulating earlier in the process.

6EnhanceCollaboration

6. Enhance collaboration

 More readers and diversity of readers can lead to more and richer collaboration. Open access can help identify critical colleagues otherwise not reached through traditional publishing communication channels.

5DriveInnovation

5. Drive innovation

What does Google Scholar always say? Stand on the shoulders of giants!  Our greatest world achievements are rarely standalone accomplishments.  Scholars feed off one another, learn from one another, and grow from one another through sharing and collaboration, which is enhanced by open access.

4IncreaseUsefulness

4. Increase usefulness

Broadening the reach and impact of research makes all those tireless hours of effort that went into creating it all the more worthwhile. I’ll reiterate my early question: You didn’t spend all that time on research and writing to lock away your findings, did you?

3ShifttheEconomics

3. Shift the economics

Publishers provide added value to a manuscript, through editing, formatting, promotion, and some discoverability services, which incur some cost. For many though, the business model has fallen out of balance.  Much research is supported by taxpayers and authors and peer-reviewers are not paid for their publications.  Open access realigns the business model so that the research conducted as a public good is available to the public.

2Jointhe21stCentury

2. Join the 21st century

 We take advantage of several cutting-edge technologies just to tell our friends how good our lunch was, why would we rely on an antiquated print-based model for communicating important research findings? While many journals are available electronically today, the present system artificially treats them as if they were just as encumbered to obtain and create as their print counterparts when they are clearly not.

1SavetheWorld

1. Save the world!

Yes, this is a bold statement to make, but who knows what accelerated and enhanced collaboration and innovation can lead to? Better addressing climate change?  Ending world food insecurity?  Curbing pandemic diseases?  The only way to know is by opening the communication channels and sharing more.

Have questions? Want to learn more? Read up on Open Access on the Scholarly Communication at Tufts site.

Post contributed by Judy Rabinowitz

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