Posts by: Katherine Morley

You may have noticed some new things in the library when you came back for the semester. And if you haven’t…why not go check them out?

On the 4th floor, we converted some empty bookshelves into a high counter like the one on the other side of the floor. There are power outlets built in to the top of the counter, so you can pull up a seat for lunch and stay there all afternoon.

 

Over at the Library Service Desk, we have new touchscreen monitors that will make your interactions at the Desk even easier. These were purchased with a Jay Daly Technology Grant that we were awarded by North Atlantic Health Sciences Libraries, Inc, which is our local chapter of the Medical Library Association.

 

And just up the stairs on the 5th floor, we have some exciting new furniture! We relocated a number of small tables and installed 10 Brody WorkLounges, which have been receiving rave reviews from our colleagues at other libraries. The Brodys are designed to help minimize distractions and keep your body supported in an optimal position for focusing. Each one has built-in power and a storage shelf where you can tuck away your belongings and focus on your work.

You can let us know what you think or give us suggestions for things you’d like to see in the library by emailing us at hhsl@tufts.edu. We always welcome your feedback!

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Specially-trained student Data Lab Assistants now provide walk-up help at the Tufts Technology Services Support Desk on the 5th floor of the Sackler building.  Lab Assistants can answer questions about Geographic Information Systems (GIS), statistics and data visualization, and troubleshoot basic problems with related software.  Each assistant has specific areas of expertise, so check the table below to get the help you need!

Data Lab Assistant hours can also be viewed on the Data Lab calendar (use the arrow in the upper right corner of the calendar to limit view to Boston Campus).

For additional support, please email Tufts Data Lab:  DataLab-Support@elist.tufts.edu

Post contributed by Laura Pavlech

 

The weather is gross and you have a lot of work to do. Why not cheer yourself up by sending some love? This Thursday and Friday we’ll have a variety of supplies out at the Library Service Desk so you can make valentines for yourself, your friends, or that special someone (your favorite librarian, perhaps?). Let someone know how much you appreciate them! (Or just have fun playing with some glitter and doilies).  Crafting starts at noon!

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It’s the start of a new semester! Hirsh Library would like to extend a warm welcome to all of our new students and say “welcome back!” to our returning students. To help you start the semester off on the right foot, we invite you to join us for tea and treats on Tuesday 1/23 at 3pm down at the Library Service Desk! Be sure to stop by on Thursday 1/25 and Friday 1/26 as well–we’ll have puzzles out in honor of National Puzzle Day on 1/29. Hope to see you next week, but if we don’t, we’re sure we’ll see you soon!

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Springer Nature Experiments is a new platform that searches four protocol and method resources simultaneously: Springer Protocols, Nature Protocols, Nature Methods, and Protocol Exchange, providing easy access to more than 50,000 protocols and methods.

Unique indexing means that you can quickly find protocols and methods for a particular organism, common and emerging techniques, or videos.

The summary page for each protocol and method provides an abstract, version history, figures and videos from the article, and the number of citations the article has received.  This information helps you choose the best protocol or method for your work without scanning multiple articles on different sites.  When you find one that works, then you can click through to the full text, available through Tufts Libraries.

 

Post contributed by Laura Pavlech

Torn between taking a break to make a craft or to eat a snack? This week you’re in luck! Stop by the Library Service Desk this Thursday 12/7 and Friday 12/8 starting at 1pm and create an architectural masterpiece with graham crackers, frosting, and a bunch of candy.

And to make this week even sweeter, we’re also welcoming Paws for People back on Thursday from 2-4pm! Stop by the room behind the cafe on Sackler 4 and relax with some therapy dogs. But please don’t share your gingerbread house with them!

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Image source: https://publons.com/about/logos

Sign up for an account with Publons and you can track and showcase your peer review and editorial work. Once you register for a free account, you can add reviews done for journals or conferences to a public profile. Publons has partnered with major journals and publishers to verify these reviews.

In Publons, you can:

  • Control what information is displayed on your public profile, such as publisher, journal, article title and review content
  • Generate a printable version of your peer review and editorial history, which can be added to your CV or grant applications
  • Compare your peer review and editorial contributions to others in your discipline or at your institution

You can access Publons through Web of Science, in the top bar area.
Post contributed by Judy Rabinowitz

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In observance of the university holiday for Veterans Day on Friday 11/10, the library will be operating with limited hours. The Library Service Desk will be open from 12pm-7pm and the library offices will be closed for the day. We will resume our regular hours on Saturday and Sunday.

Open Access publications have been around for decades yet there are still many misconceptions and doubts about their reliability, quality and value. One of the top misconceptions is that Open Access journals are of lower quality, not peer-reviewed, and the equivalent of self-publication.

The Journal of Clinical Investigation, a highly respected publication founded in 1924 and published by the American Society for Clinical Investigation, is a peer-reviewed biomedical research journal covering a range of medical disciplines incuding Immunology, Neuroscience, Oncology, and Gastroenterology. In 1996 it was one of the first to make its research articles freely available. Why would they do such a thing? According to the editor at the time, the non-profit nature of their work informed their decision. Today, according to SCOPUS, the journal has a CiteScore* of 10.98, a SCImago Journal Rank (SJR)** of 8.074, and a Source Normalized Impact Per Paper (SNIP)Ɨ of 2.787.

The National Academy of Medicine, established in 1970 and now part of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine is another example of a well-respected research institution that along with its partners provides thousands of open access publications for the benefit of people around the world.

The PLoS journals offer other examples of high-quality, non-profit, open access publishing. On their website PLoS, which was founded in 2001, states their belief that “open is no longer just about free and unrestricted access to research, it’s also about open data, transparency in peer review and an open approach to science assessment.” Of the PLoS journals, PLoS Medicine has the highest CiteScore (8.73), SJR (5.951), and SNIP (3.612).

Here are some other Open Access misconceptions. Can you tell fact from fiction? To find the answers check out Busting OA Myths.

Fact or Fiction?

  • Faculty can freely use their own published content in courses they teach.
  • Open Access is a cost shifting device.
  • Public Access and Open Access accomplish the same thing.

Post contributed by Jane Natches

 

*CiteScore measures average citations received per document published in the serial.

**SJR measures weighted citations received by the serial. Citation weighting depends on subject field and prestige of the citing serial.

ƗSNIP measures actual citations received relative to citations expected for the serial’s subject field.

What is open data?

Open access is not just for publications.  Indeed, access to the data that supports an article may be as important as access to the article itself.  Open data is research data that is freely available online for anyone to download, copy, and reuse, with no financial, legal or technical barriers.

Open data enhances the reproducibility and transparency of research by allowing other investigators to verify authors’ findings.  Freely available data also enhances the rate of scientific discovery by allowing anyone to analyze data in ways that its creators did not anticipate.

Adapted from the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC).

Where can I find open data?

You may be familiar with freely available data from state and national government organizations and surveys, such as the National Cancer Institute Genomic Data Commons, a data sharing and analysis platform that provides genomic datasets and the tools to analyze them, or the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), a series of studies that assess health and nutritional status of Americans.

Increasingly, research institutes, projects, labs and individuals are making their data freely available, either because a journal or funder requires them to do so, or simply because they want others to reuse their work (and get credit when they do!).  Freely available data can be found in many data repositories, which provide long-term access to, and preservation and storage of, data.

For a local twist on open data, check out Analyze Boston, where you can find freely available datasets from the city of Boston, or Personal Genome Project, a project started at the Harvard Medical School that invites participants to publicly share their personal genetic, health and trait data.

If you need help finding open data, or want to learn more about making your data freely available, then please email us at hhsl@tufts.edu.

Post contributed by Laura Pavlech