The crew here at Hirsh Health Sciences Library love our mascot, Leo the skeleton. He appears in our videos, hosts exciting holiday events (like our Valentine’s Day Kissing Booth), and he might even bring you #CoffeeOnCall. As we usher in the month of April, we decided to repay Leo for all of his hard work by giving him the gift of facial reconstruction. Forensic facial reconstruction is a fascinating field, blending art and science to recreate faces based on the characteristics of the skull. Enjoy this brief video from the Smithsonian Channel on the practice.

Recently, we’ve been able to see for the first time the faces of many individuals lost to history, from J.S. Bach to Richard III to colonists from Jamestown. Doesn’t Leo deserve, nay DEMAND the same treatment as great minds such as William Shakespeare and Copernicus?

Without further ado, I would like to unveil Leo, the true face of the Hirsh Health Sciences Library.

meet_leo

Or, you know, I really would like to. But we ran out of money a little bit into the process. We hope to finish this project someday, but man…those artists are GOOD, and good work doesn’t come cheap. In the meantime, gaze fondly at Leo while he…um…stares you down? Invades your psyche? Haunts your nightmares? I don’t know, I’m not the boss of you. Happy April!*

 

 

 

*Happy April Fools everyone! Also, Leo is made of plastic, he’s noone’s earthly remains…but I do wonder what (or WHO) he’d look like.

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We’d like to give a shout out to the Sackler School for National Bunsen Burner Day.  Today we commemorate the birth of the German chemist Robert Wilhelm Eberhard Bunsen, born in 1811.

 

Courtesy of OpenClipArt

Courtesy of OpenClipArt

 

A Bunsen burner is a long, hollow tube and when combining gas and air, a hot flame is produced.

 

Image courtesy of http://muppet.wikia.com

Courtesy of http://muppet.wikia.com and the Walt Disney Company

 

Take a moment to appreciate this device and its value in science!

The first of our extended hours for 2015 will be this weekend, March 28th-29th, and the Hirsh Library Service Desk will be open 10 am to 10 pm.   Our building will be open a bit later on Saturday. Swipe access will end as usual at 11PM, but you may remain in the library until 2AM!  So if you find yourself lost in study you won’t have to leave by midnight.  Good luck with your exams!

 

10-Oclock Edit 2

Leo is back with another exciting blog post and this time explores the world of printing!  He provides some useful tips so please pay attention.  First time using JumboCash?  Leo will help you out (along with Lizzy)!

 

Ask Leo Episode Seven: Printing and JumboCash from Tufts HHSL on Vimeo.

Congratulations class of 2015 on your match!  Match Day is an annual event that began in 1952 where medical students learn where they will have their residency program.  On Friday, March 20th the service desk on the 4th floor will be closed from 11am-2pm to accommodate celebrations for this event.  All other floors will be open for study.  Please plan on obtaining laptops and reserve items prior to 11am if you need them.  Thank you!

 

Match Day 2014

Match Day 2014

Hello everyone! Next week, the Hirsh Health Sciences Library will be doing its semi-annual Affiliation Week Survey. What this means for you is that 4 times a day, a staff member will come around and ask every person in the library what school they’re affiliated with (Medical, Dental, Sackler, Friedman, etc). We are not asking for any identifying information, just school affiliation. In fact, this is the entire Affiliation Survey that we use:

Affiliation Survey

We do this semi-annually so we can make sure we have the best data about our user base, which lets us allocate resources appropriately to best serve all of the patrons on the Health Sciences campus.

You have a couple options for a response: you can always actually tell us (and we’re always happy to talk to you!). However, if you prefer to not speak, you’re welcome to leave your ID next to you while you study, or you can grab a piece of scrap paper from either the 4th or 5th floor desk, and write it down there. If you choose to do that, please make sure the ID or scrap paper is out in the open next to you. If you’re in a group study room with a group, you can write how many members of what schools are represented in the room, and tape it to the outside of the study room door (example: “5 Medical, 3 Dental, 1 Nutrition”).

Just please remember to take down any signs you put up, and to remove any IDs or papers you put on the desks by you.

If you have any questions or concerns at all, don’t hesitate to ask us! You can call us at 617-636-6706, e-mail us at hhslcirc@tufts.edu, visit our live chat on the Ask Us page, or even just swing by the desk on the 4th floor and chat to us in person.

Thank you for your assistance with this, and we look forward to a nice smooth Affiliation Week!

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Got that seasonal craving for corned beef, but not in the mood for a boiled dinner? Try making a hash!

Cauliflower

Cauliflower (Liz West)| CC BY 2.0

Substituting cauliflower for potatoes is a great way to cut down on carbs or to protect yourself from potato overload if, like me, you’re planning to eat a bunch of potatoes in another form (boxty anyone?).

The caramelized cauliflower compliments the saltiness of the corned beef and will add a number of great nutrients to your dish!

I use this recipe from I Breathe I’m Hungry as my guide, but like to improvise by throwing some leeks in as well.

 

Enjoy!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Exams and papers looming? Here are some of the great resources the library has to offer!

E-Books 

Is there a book you need but you can’t make it to the library? Check to see if we have it available electronically! You can search the library’s catalog or browse our growing eBook collection here.

EndNote/Ref Works

EndNote/RefWorks are citation management programs that are available to Tufts students. These programs allow you to create a personal database of references from which you can generate in-text citations and bibliographies in a variety of citation styles.

Learn more about EndNote.

Learn more about RefWorks.

Health Sciences Writing Consultants

Need some help with your writing? Our Writing Consultants are here to help with proposals, papers, personal statements, and more! Book a 45 minute appointment or just drop in Wednesdays from 4-7pm and Sundays from 2-5pm.

Research & Instruction Librarians

The Research & Instruction Librarians are here for you Monday-Friday (7:30-5:00) and can assist you with your research questions. They’re experts in searching databases (like PubMed, Ovid Medline, and Web of Science), skilled in the use of citation managers (Refworks, EndNote), and will help you search high and low for the answer to any question. You won’t usually see them behind the desk, but they’re on-call and waiting for your questions. You may not know this, but the R&I Librarians also serve as liaisons to different schools and departments: http://www.library.tufts.edu/hsl/services/liaisons.php; feel free to see who your liaison is and yes, they take appointments!

 

Good luck!

This weekend we will be “springing forward” to begin Daylight Savings Time. While our smart devices will automatically make the time change for us, do remember to set your ‘not-so-smart’ wall clocks, alarm clocks, appliances and watches one hour ahead on Saturday night before you go to bed.

So, what’s the deal with Daylight Savings Time, anyway?  “The basic idea [of Daylight Savings Time] is to make the best use of daylight hours by shifting the clock forward in the Spring and backward in the Fall. Daylight Saving Time has been in use throughout much of the United States, Canada and Europe since World War I.”1

On the plus side, we will have more daylight, so sunset on Sunday, March 8 will be 6:42pm (yeah!). On the minus side, we will lose an hour of sleep (uggh!) and it will be pretty dark when you wake up for a few weeks (sunrise on Sunday, March 8 will be 7:09am – oof!).

Losing an hour of sleep can be a challenge! Did you know that there are more heart attacks during time transitions?2

Here’s a few tips from the good folks at Vanderbilt’s Sleep Disorders Clinic to help you make the transition as smooth as possible:

http://news.vanderbilt.edu/2013/03/vanderbilt-sleep-expert-offers-daylight-saving-survival-tips/

Happy (almost) Spring!

Time_change_Ben_Dodson
Image courtesy of Ben Dobson through the Creative Commons license.

 

1.     Espenak F, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. Daylight saving time. 2008; http://eclipse.gsfc.nasa.gov/SEhelp/daylightsaving.html. Accessed March 2, 2015.

2.    Janszky I, Ljung R. Shifts to and from daylight saving time and incidence of myocardial infarction. The New England journal of medicine. Oct 30 2008;359(18):1966-1968.

 

…Your estates and your freedom, your children and Wives; A story I’ll tell you that’s truth now indeed, And when you hear of it your hearts will bleed.

The above comes from A Verse Occasioned by the late horrid Massacre in King-Street, a broadside published in Boston in 1770 to express outrage over the events of the evening of March 5th, the event we now know as the Boston Massacre. On the evening of March 5, 1770, a row broke out in front of the Custom House on King Street (now State Street) in Boston. Accounts of what provoked the trouble are mixed, but most include a soldier striking a boy, and a mob of Bostonians replying by hurling both snowballs and insults at the soldier. As the crowd grew more hostile, more soldiers were called in, and eventually nine armed British soldiers faced a rowdy group of over 50 colonists. Eventually, the soldiers fired into the mob, and when the casualties were totaled, five men were dead and six more were injured. The events of that March evening were seized upon by Boston radicals, and spun to create even more animosity toward the Crown. One of the most famous pieces of propaganda is Paul Revere’s compelling (if inaccurate) depiction of the event, which circulated wildly in the spring of 1770.

Paul Revere, “The Bloody Massacre in King-Street, March 5, 1770.” Boston, 1770. (Gilder Lehrman Collection)

Of course, this event took place a short walk from the Hirsh Health Sciences Library. Commemorate this event with a Boston Massacre Study Break! Start on the Freedom Trail, and visit the Boston Massacre Marker on the corner of State and Congress Streets, right near the Old State House. Head back toward campus on Tremont Street, and stop in at the Granary Burying Ground. You’ll find the grave marker for the victims of the Massacre next to Samuel Adams. You can also visit with John Hancock and Paul Revere while you’re there. As you follow Tremont toward Boylston Street, take a detour into Boston Common at Avery Street, and enjoy the beautiful Boston Massacre/Crispus Attucks Monument, erected in 1888. If your interest is piqued, there is a full day of (ahem) “family friendly events” planned at the Old State House Museum, including activities for little ones and culminating in the annual reenactment of the Boston Massacre at 7:00 pm this Saturday.

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