Happy 2020!

Each January brings an array of welcome changes…maybe you’re giving that whole Dry January thing a try (which might decrease alcohol consumption later in the year), or it’s a Whole30 for you, or maybe this is the year you run that marathon, since that new study in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology shows that those training for their first marathon may experience a reduction in vascular age.

But why do any of that when you can simply revel in the Medline Data Changes for 2020! Cheers!

So what sort of changes does 2020 bring to Medical Subject Headings?

97 terms were changed or deleted and replaced with current terminology (for example, Swaziland is now Eswatini, reflecting the official name change of the nation in 2018).

293 new MeSH headings and 2 new publication types joined the thesaurus this year as well. Some new headings of particular note to HHSL researchers include:

You can review the full list here: https://www.nlm.nih.gov/mesh/2020/download/2020NewMeSHheadingsSingleColumn.pdf.

For more information about using MeSH, please visit our guide to Advanced Searching Techniques.

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In observance of Martin Luther King Jr. Day, we will be operating with a modified schedule on Monday, January 20th. The Library Service Desk will be open from 12pm-7pm and the Library Offices will be closed. We will be open for our usual hours on Saturday and Sunday. Stay warm and have a great long weekend!

 

Attention first-year medical students! The HHSL collection includes several virtual and physical anatomy models to help you study this semester. Several anatomy models are on reserve and available for check out from the Library Service Desk, including real, plastic, and labeled skulls. (See our skull menu posted at the Service Desk!)

Through the HHSL website, you can also access virtual anatomy resources.

Anterior Triangle, Hyoid Muscles and the Hypoglossal Nerve 6) Sternohyoid Muscle © Scholar Educational Systems, Inc 2001-2019. Used under Tufts – Hirsh Health Sciences Library License. Accessed 2 Jan 2019.

Net Anatomy contains a catalog of dissection images with labels and descriptions. The Test feature hides labels—a handy tool for doing self-assessments as you study.

Anatomy.TV by Primal Pictures is another database of images, comprised of 3D, interactive models.


Dissection: ankle and foot superficial dissection © Informa UK Limited 2019. Used under Tufts – Hirsh Health Sciences Library License. Accessed 2 Jan 2019.

Investigate a more extensive list of Hirsh’s anatomy resources from our Anatomy Research Guide.

Post contributed by Christina Heinrich

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New PubMed main search screen

Did you know that PubMed has just undergone a major “facelift” as of January 1, 2020? Is this news to you? Not sure where to begin? Please come to one of our “Introducing the *New* PubMed” workshops and learn more about how changes to PubMed will impact the way you search it. This workshop will discuss both what’s new to PubMed and what has remained unchanged. If you are a long-time PubMed user, this workshop is for you!

Introducing the *New* PubMed – register

Thursday, January 23, 2020 

12:00pm – 1:00pm

Hirsh Library 510

 

Introducing the *New* PubMed -register

Thursday, January 30, 2020 

12:00pm – 1:00pm

Hirsh Library 510

 

 

Through mid-February, Hirsh Library is home to the traveling exhibit Physicians Assistants: Collaboration and Care. This exhibition was developed by the National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health, in partnership with the Physician Assistant History Society, and showcases the history and evolution of the profession. You will find it on our 6th floor, just outside the main elevators. To learn more about the exhibition, please visit the official exhibition site. We hope you will come by to check it out!

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Hi everyone!  Happy December. But we are here to talk about October, so…Happy October in Retrospect.

As you may recall, back in October we walked around and asked you all what school you were with. Well, this is the result!

Vertical bar graph of how many people from each program were counted in the library

Click to enlarge

We counted a lot of people! I for one am glad you all like us here. A few people have asked me if there were any surprises with this data, but honestly, not really. The Dental school coming in at 1274, Medical coming in at 1080, and Friedman coming in third with 231 is all the sort of thing I am used to seeing in these numbers. Which is not to say it’s bad! It’s actually quite nice to see how consistent we’ve been over the years, especially as we keep adding more and more seating (and subsequently see these numbers grow even larger from time to time).

Now for the unaware, we tend to time this survey so that we get a full week’s worth of data, even if they days themselves are spread out over the course of a month (randomized, with certain accounting for things like Indigenous Peoples’ Day). This is what that “week” ended up looking like this time:

Vertical bar graph of the number of people counted for each day of a calendar week

Click to enlarge

I found this data to be the surprising data. Friday was our busiest day! We counted 674 people on the Friday we did this, and that is astonishing to me. Wednesday being 642 makes sense, and traditionally the busiest day of the week for us tends to alternate between Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday, and Saturday being the slowest at 281 sounds right to me. Heck, even Sunday only being 284 seems right. But Friday being the busiest day for counting? I am truly surprised by that.

Naturally, because I am me, I also broke this data up by time of the day and by floor, like so:

Vertical bar graph of the number of people counted for each time we walked around for the count

Click to enlarge

Vertical bar graph of the number of people counted on each floor

Click to enlarge

Remember earlier, when I was talking about the school/program breakdown being what I expected? Well, the times and floors are pretty typical of what I see month-to-month with our other data, but this is a great way to take a look at a day in the life of the library. We get crazy busy right around lunch, stay that way through the afternoon, there’s a slight tapering off around dinner, and then then the number of people in the library drops by the final count of the night (in this case, from 959 people at 6pm down to 328 at 3pm).

That graph of the floor count is frankly one of my favorite pieces of data in the library. We have been adding so many chairs and so much more furniture over the years the the amount of people on the 7th floor just keeps going up, and as of this past October we were counting over double the amount of people on that floor as any other! Just look at that: the 7th floor had 1605 people counted on it, and the 5th floor came in second at a distance (less than half!) 769 people. That’s nuts. I’m sure it doesn’t surprise anybody who’s been up there, of course, but it’s still nuts.

 

Vertical bar graph of circulation data from July-November

Click to enlarge

Finally, to bring it all home and give you a spot of context, this graph is the Circulation data from July – November, which as of writing is the most recent data I have. To be clear, it is the number of checkouts per month, not the number of people who have checked things out (because if you check out a skull, a laptop, and a book, that could just be 1 person, but 3 checkouts. See how it works?). October is far and away the most checkouts, at 2616 – September is a relatively distant second at 1924. Given the change in some curricula on campus, I don’t know what to expect for the spring this year – generally, October and April are our busiest months, but time will tell! Hopefully I’ll have some interesting stories from the data come my next summer retrospective.

Well, thank you for reading! I hope this fall brought good things for you, and I hope the winter (and subsequent spring) bring even better! Have a great day everyone, and if you come by the desk on the 4th floor make sure to say hi! I’ll probably be there.

-Tom-

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The end of the semester is finally within reach! With the holidays now upon us, Hirsh Library will be operating with modified hours from Friday, December 20th through Wednesday, January 1st. The full schedule is as follows:

Friday, December 20st: 7:45am-5pm

Saturday, December 22nd-Wednesday, December 25th: Closed

Thursday, December 26th-Friday, December 27th: 7:45am-5pm

Saturday, December 28th- Sunday December 29th: Closed

Monday, December 30th-Tuesday, December 31st: 7:45am-5pm

Wednesday, January 1st: Closed

We will reopen for regular hours at 7:45am on Thursday, January 2nd. 

Best wishes for a happy and healthy new year from all of us here at Hirsh!

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Our Graphic Medicine collection has been steadily growing with a number of new releases, and some old favorites that we’ve recently acquired. The HHSL Graphic Medicine collection can be found on the 4th floor across from the Library Service desk. Since the section’s inception in the summer of 2018, the collection has grown to include titles dealing with a wide range of healthcare issues; including, addiction, Alzheimer’s, bipolar disorder, breast cancer, down syndrome, epilepsy, LGBTQ health, OCD, and Parkinson’s disease. Graphic Medicine divulges the lived experiences of patients dealing with illness, as well as personal accounts of the challenges faced by medical professionals.

Below is a list of recent titles added to our collection:

I had the pleasure of discussing the value of Graphic Medicine as a format in healthcare communication at the Charleston Library Conference this past fall. The poster presentation is available at this link.

If there is a Graphic Medicine novel that we don’t have which you would like to read, please let us know by recommending a purchase.

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RefWorks logo

Do you currently have a RefWorks account? If yes, you may have received an email reminding you that RefWorks will no longer be available after December 31st. This means that, even if you haven’t used RefWorks in awhile, any references you currently have on RefWorks will no longer be accessible!  Yikes! The good news is that you still have a few more weeks to transfer your references from your RefWorks account into another citation manager – and we’re here to help you do it!

To get started, please take a look at our Refworks guide: https://researchguides.library.tufts.edu/refworks This guide lists citation managers that are available to you and instructions for how to migrate your references from RefWorks into a new citation manager. In addition to the guide, you are welcome to make an appointment with an Hirsh librarian for help with migrating references. All you need to do is schedule a consultation with us: https://hirshlibrary.tufts.edu/eform/submit/schedule-a-consultation

So, as they might say at your local pub, “Last call for RefWorks!  We don’t care which citation manager you go with, but you can’t stay with RefWorks!”

 

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Image by Samuel1983 from Pixabay

Have you checked your WiFi settings lately? Tufts has three networks that you can connect to: Tufts_Guest, Tufts_Wireless, and Tufts_Secure. While you can get online with any of them, Tufts_Secure is the preferred network for the Tufts Community. If you notice that your connection seems slow, check to make sure you’re connected to the secure network and not Tufts_Guest or Tufts_Wireless. Please visit  TTS’s WiFi page for more information about connecting to each network.

 
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