Beginning at sundown this Wednesday, (May 12) is one of the most joyous holidays in the Islamic calendar, Eid al-Fitr! Eid al-Fitr marks the end of Islamic holy month of fasting, Ramadan. Eid al-Fitr is celebrated around the world with family and friends, sumptuous feasts and fireworks. The Hirsh Health Sciences Library sends out best wishes for a wonderful Eid al-Fitr!  Eid Mubarak!

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Want to learn more about Eid Al-Fitr? Looking for some dishes to contribute to your feast? Check out the fabulous links  below:

How is Eid al-Fitr celebrated around the world? (BBC)
https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/articles/z4cmkmn

38 Ramadan Recipes for Your Eid Feast (Saveur)
https://www.saveur.com/ramadan-eid-recipes/

 

 

 

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Registration is now open for the fourth meeting of Hirsh’s Anti-Racist Reading Group. This next session will occur on Friday, May 21st from 12pm to 1pm EST. We are excited to announce the reading for our fourth session, an academic article about Asian American health data.

Discussion questions about the reading are forthcoming and will be posted in the document with the link to the reading a week in advance. Community guidelines will remain the same as the last sessions’ guidelines. However, as always, please feel free to reach out if you would like to add other guidelines!

Please follow this link to register for the event.

In past sessions, students, staff, and faculty from across the Boston campus have attended. The discussion has benefited from the sharing of perspectives from across disciplines and roles to understand and address racism in the health sciences. If you’re thinking about joining us—even for the first time—we welcome everyone within the Tufts community to join regardless of field or title!

We hope you’re able to join and look forward to the discussion!

 

Post contributed by Andrea Kang, Amanda Nevius, and Christina Heinrich

 

 

[Content Warning: race-based violence against BIPOC, particularly Asian communities]

May marks the start of Asian Pacific American (APA) Heritage Month in the United States. While celebrating milestones and accomplishments of Asian communities is important, so is reflecting on the racialized violence that Asian communities have experienced in the past year and beyond. In order to aid in learning about how racialized violence against Asians has existed in the fabric of the United States, as well as how that impacts health disparities in Asian communities, we have created a new landing page in our Anti-Racism Resources Guide. This rotating landing page focusing on Asian communities also hopes to help highlight parallels between the sufferings of other marginalized communities in the United States in order to recognize the fact that all those who are minoritized are being harmed under the same systems of oppression of white supremacy.

On Tuesday, March 16, 2021, 8 people were murdered in Atlanta, GA at two separate Asian spa locations. 6 of the 8 who were killed identified as Asian and all but one were women. While not all who were killed identified as Asian, many have voiced that these murders happened because a white man targeted Asian women specifically to eliminate his sexual temptations. (More reporting can be found online at the New York Times through this link).

These murders, however, are not the only violent acts that have been perpetrated in Asian communities. As the organization Stop AAPI Hate reports, out of the reported incidents alone, there have been 3,292 incidents in 2020 and 503 incidents that have occurred thus far in 2021 (for the National Report from Stop AAPI Hate and more, visit their website). This violence towards Asians have ranged from spitting, verbal abuse, death, and more. From the stabbing of a 36-year-old man in New York City’s Chinatown, to elder Xie Xiaozhen being punched in the face by a white man in San Francisco, to the murder of elder Vichar Ratanapakdee also in San Franciscoto children as young as 2 and 6 years old being stabbed at a Sam’s Club in Texas, many reports have gone viral. Furthermore, while these attacks have mostly occurred in East Asian and Southeast Asian communities, for decades, the Middle Eastern and South Asian communities have been targeted due to the 9/11 tragedyMost recently, the Sikh community was attacked in Indianapolis where 4 of 8 victims identified as Sikh. Many more Asians have suffered attacks without their stories being reported or cared about in mainstream media, at their schools, and at their workplaces.

These incidents of hate and violence are not happening in a vacuum.  The goal of the resources shared on our new landing page is to provide context for the racialized violence against Asians in the United States, explore its impact on the health sciences, and aid in unlearning these harmful practices.

As always, if you have suggestions on additions to the resource guide, please feel free to fill out the survey linked here.

 

Post contributed by Andrea Kang, Amanda Nevius, and Christina Heinrich

 

It is writing season! Between personal statements and thesis-writing, the realm of written word can be especially daunting. Plagiarism can occur in every part of academia, from grade school up to tenureship. It happens—sometimes intentionally and sometimes accidentally—to any type of writer. What’s important is taking responsibility for your own academic integrity when possible.

A quill writing on paperIn our plagiarism LibGuide, our librarian Amy Lapidow has outlined some excellent resources for the purposes of plagiarism checks. One of these is DupliChecker, which is a free online service that checks your work for copied material. Another is TurnItIn.Com. Below is Amy Lapidow’s instructions:

  • Turnitin
  • Check your paper! Look for “Open Class for Students” Class ID 20577570 with keycode “Capstone”
  • You should be able to add yourself to the class.
  • If you cannot add yourself to this class, please let us know and we can help.

Remember, if you’re having trouble during the writing process, you can make an appointment with Christine Smith, who is our writing consultant for the Boston campus.

Best of luck with all of your writing!

 

 

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Do you find yourself going from class assignment to class assignment, thinking “I wish I had a part-time job with flexible hours, and specifically over at Hirsh Library, because they all seem like such great people”? Well have I got good news for you: we’ll be hiring soon!

As HHSL begins to return to in-person operations, we’re going to need student staff to help keep the desk open and library services running smoothly. The schedule is fixed but flexible – two scheduled shifts a week with the opportunity to pick up more as they occasionally open up, but all with the understanding that life happens (board exams, externships, lab experiments gaining sentience and running off into the countryside, etc). The position duties are a mix of circulating material (like the anatomy models and laptops), helping patrons find articles and books they’re looking for, and lending a hand to the R&I staff (such as scanning articles for Interlibrary Loan).

In return, you’ll get to: work in a great environment alongside students from other programs on campus; really hone your research skills; polish your communication skills by assisting a wide variety of people (the entire Health Sciences Campus, including students, faculty, and the staff of the Tufts Medical Center); and get to know the librarians on a first-name basis (they’re great people, and masters of research).

We plan to do the hiring and training late this summer, in preparation for the fall semester. Individual start dates are malleable, and subject to discussion as we get closer.

If this all sounds good to you, then you should fill out an application! It takes 5 minutes, and who knows, maybe you’ll meet your new best friend! If you have any questions, feel free to send them our way at hhsl@tufts.edu, and we will be happy to answer them.

All of us here at HHSL look forward to working with you!

Leo and Theo skeletons dressed in costumes

Photo: Tom Quinn. Pirate bedazzling: Whitney Stannard.

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The day that so many have been waiting for has finally arrived!

As of April 19, 2021, adults in every U.S. state, Washington, D.C., and Puerto Rico are now eligible for a COVID-19 vaccine.

This is an exciting time for many of us, who have been waiting (possibly impatiently) for our shot. But with so many people clamoring for appointments, how can you secure an appointment for that sweet, sweet vaccine?

Here are some proven tips from your already-vaccinated friends at the Hirsh Health Sciences Library**:

Good luck and good health everyone!

**please note that these resources are listed for informational purposes, and the Hirsh Health Sciences Library is not affiliated with any site or service listed above.

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In honor of Patriots’ Day here in Massachusetts (a holiday about the Battles of Lexington and Concord in the Revolutionary War, not the football team like I thought when I was a child), Hirsh Health Sciences Library will be “closed” on Sunday and Monday, April 18th & 19th.

We will not be monitoring Live Chat, but we will still be checking Ask Us. So if you have a question, feel free to submit it there (or e-mail hhsl@tufts.edu), and you’ll get an answer all the same.

Have a great weekend!

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Tax season is happening here in the United States! If you’re like me, and this is your first year filing your taxes as an independent (and you’re hoping for that sweet stimulus check this time!), then filing your taxes can seem like a complicated project. It is not as painful as you might expect. If you’ve just realized that you haven’t filed your taxes, these links below should help you navigate this process.

If you need free filing, this is the TurboTax Free File link; here is the H&R Block Free File link. These should cover both federal and state taxes. Depending on your income level and your student status, these should be free filing options for you. (I used one of them this year).

If you are filing in the state of Massachusetts, among other things, you’ll need to fill out a Schedule HC form. This proves you have health insurance. The vital numbers you’ll need is the name of your insurance, their Federal ID number, and your subscriber number. This is the form here.

For more information about the Federal Tax Filing, please visit their website here.

For more information about the Massachusetts State Tax Filing, please visit their website here. For questions about what and how you should be applying, you can call them directly.

The deadline for the 2021 Federal Tax return is May 17th, but if you start now you’ll be able to put it out of your mind! If, for any reason, you need an extension to file your taxes, you should make the request as soon as possible. You can do that here.

 

 

 

 

 

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We’ve passed the year mark into this pandemic, and although vaccines are rolling out, it might not feel fast enough. There are board exams, non-board exams, love lives, family lives, making sure you’re eating enough – a lot of different things that can stress a person out. What is one to do?

Well good news: we have a few ideas for you!

First of all, there’s the Tufts Health & Wellness group. They’ve put together this page on stress and anxiety. It has resources, included guided meditations and tips on managing stress on the go. Definitely worth your time to check out!

Secondly: take a drink of water right now. Hydration is important, and not to be undervalued!

Perhaps you’re someone like me, who occasionally just wants nice calm scenes to look at in the background, while they work on other things. Well regardless of the weather or your ability to make it somewhere you find relaxing, good news: we have technology to help! Explore.org has a whole YouTube channel of various nature cams. The feeds seem to primarily be at rescues, so if you’re into wolves, you’ll see wolves. Eagles? They got that. Or maybe you just want to watch a bunch of kittens play together? I have that feed up as I write this!

There is a very wide variety of cameras available, of course, because people are people. Thrillist has a great write-up of a ton of live stream cams for you.

Finally, you could always put your printing allotment at the library to use, and get yourself some coloring pages to print out and color in. For example, Crayola has a whole section of free pages. Or if you wanted to support small business, you could always run a search on Etsy or similar sites. (Fair warning though: there’s no guarantee about whether your results will be safe for work.)

We here at Hirsh Library hope you’re able to relieve any stress as well as you can, and hope your Aprils are as low stress as highly-motivated graduate students in demanding programs can possibly be!

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Instead of a prank for you, we have true fun facts about April Fools!

In France, they say “Poisson D’Avril” or April Fish! This same thing in Italy is “Pesce d’aprile.”

Do you have any “April Fools” phrase equivalents in your country or culture? Leave a comment down below!

 

 
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