This weekend we will be “springing forward” to begin Daylight Savings Time. While our smart devices will automatically make the time change for us, do remember to set your ‘not-so-smart’ wall clocks, alarm clocks, appliances and watches one hour ahead on Saturday night before you go to bed.

So, what’s the deal with Daylight Savings Time, anyway?  “The basic idea [of Daylight Savings Time] is to make the best use of daylight hours by shifting the clock forward in the Spring and backward in the Fall. Daylight Saving Time has been in use throughout much of the United States, Canada and Europe since World War I.”1

On the plus side, we will have more daylight, so sunset on Sunday, March 8 will be 6:42pm (yeah!). On the minus side, we will lose an hour of sleep (uggh!) and it will be pretty dark when you wake up for a few weeks (sunrise on Sunday, March 8 will be 7:09am – oof!).

Losing an hour of sleep can be a challenge! Did you know that there are more heart attacks during time transitions?2

Here’s a few tips from the good folks at Vanderbilt’s Sleep Disorders Clinic to help you make the transition as smooth as possible:

http://news.vanderbilt.edu/2013/03/vanderbilt-sleep-expert-offers-daylight-saving-survival-tips/

Happy (almost) Spring!

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Image courtesy of Ben Dobson through the Creative Commons license.

 

1.     Espenak F, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. Daylight saving time. 2008; http://eclipse.gsfc.nasa.gov/SEhelp/daylightsaving.html. Accessed March 2, 2015.

2.    Janszky I, Ljung R. Shifts to and from daylight saving time and incidence of myocardial infarction. The New England journal of medicine. Oct 30 2008;359(18):1966-1968.

 

…Your estates and your freedom, your children and Wives; A story I’ll tell you that’s truth now indeed, And when you hear of it your hearts will bleed.

The above comes from A Verse Occasioned by the late horrid Massacre in King-Street, a broadside published in Boston in 1770 to express outrage over the events of the evening of March 5th, the event we now know as the Boston Massacre. On the evening of March 5, 1770, a row broke out in front of the Custom House on King Street (now State Street) in Boston. Accounts of what provoked the trouble are mixed, but most include a soldier striking a boy, and a mob of Bostonians replying by hurling both snowballs and insults at the soldier. As the crowd grew more hostile, more soldiers were called in, and eventually nine armed British soldiers faced a rowdy group of over 50 colonists. Eventually, the soldiers fired into the mob, and when the casualties were totaled, five men were dead and six more were injured. The events of that March evening were seized upon by Boston radicals, and spun to create even more animosity toward the Crown. One of the most famous pieces of propaganda is Paul Revere’s compelling (if inaccurate) depiction of the event, which circulated wildly in the spring of 1770.

Paul Revere, “The Bloody Massacre in King-Street, March 5, 1770.” Boston, 1770. (Gilder Lehrman Collection)

Of course, this event took place a short walk from the Hirsh Health Sciences Library. Commemorate this event with a Boston Massacre Study Break! Start on the Freedom Trail, and visit the Boston Massacre Marker on the corner of State and Congress Streets, right near the Old State House. Head back toward campus on Tremont Street, and stop in at the Granary Burying Ground. You’ll find the grave marker for the victims of the Massacre next to Samuel Adams. You can also visit with John Hancock and Paul Revere while you’re there. As you follow Tremont toward Boylston Street, take a detour into Boston Common at Avery Street, and enjoy the beautiful Boston Massacre/Crispus Attucks Monument, erected in 1888. If your interest is piqued, there is a full day of (ahem) “family friendly events” planned at the Old State House Museum, including activities for little ones and culminating in the annual reenactment of the Boston Massacre at 7:00 pm this Saturday.

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Are you the parent of a young child? Occasionally, you may need to bring your little one with you to campus, including the library. That’s why we want you to know that the library keeps a box of kid-friendly things (small toys, crayons and coloring books,  stuffed animals) to help occupy your little one while you’re here. This box of kid-friendly toys is kept at the Info Desk on the 4th floor of the library. So, next time you’ve got your baby with you,  just ask about the “kid’s box”!

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Image credit: Uberprutser
[CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)],
from Wikimedia Commons

 

Fun! Fun! Fun!

Need a study break? Drop by the Circulation Desk every Tuesday between 2-8pm and get competitive with a board game (we have Operation!) or relax with a puzzle–the choice is yours! We’ll have a selection of entertaining diversions out for you to enjoy on the 4th floor.

Want to play a game on a different day of the week? No problem! Just ask at the desk–we’d be happy to hand one over.

 

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You spoke, we listened! Starting today the Hirsh Health Sciences Library launches a pilot project that opens 7 rooms on Sackler 5 for advanced reservations.

These Collaboration Rooms are available for groups of 2 or more Health Sciences Campus students to book for academic work during staffed Library hours. These spaces are designed for collaborative projects, brainstorming, and group work of all kinds. They are equipped with various types of technology for all your needs.

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Time to Party, Book Your Rooms! (New Year’s Eve party aboard the shantyboat Lazy Bones. Original floridamemory.com/items/show/245401) 

Visit http://tufts.libcal.com/booking/hhsl to book your Collaboration Room and read the full details, terms, and conditions.

This Pilot Program will run from March 2 through May 15, 2015. Continuation of the Collaboration Room booking program depends on YOU! Please send questions, comments, or concerns to hhsl@tufts.edu.

And go here to book your room now!

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Are you tired of coming to us for a new DynaMed number?  Well you’re in luck because there is a new DynaMed Mobile App!

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Please follow these instructions for installing the new and improved app!

  • Download the free DynaMed App from the iTunes Store or Google Play.
  • Go to our library homepage and select DynaMed from our Popular Links drop down menu.
  • Select “mobile” from the top banner
  • Enter your email address. (An authentication key will be emailed to you.)
  • Open the DynaMed email from your device.
  • Within 48 hours, tap on the link in the email to authenticate the App.  (Note: after 48 hours, you will need to request a new authentication key.)
  • Your device is ready to go!

Please feel free to contact a member of staff if you have any questions!

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Are you in a reading rut? Do you need a break from your textbook? The library has recently acquired some new leisure reading books, so swing by our new books section across from the 4th floor library service desk. Here are some of our recently added titles:

What books did we miss? Let us know what you’d like to see in our collection by recommending a purchase.

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Today is the Chinese New Year, which is also known as the Lunar New Year since the celebration begins on the first day of the Chinese Lunar Calendar.  2015 is the Year of the Sheep. It’s also called the Spring Festival as it marks the beginning of warmer weather in China, even though Boston will have to wait a little longer for some warmer days…

John Stephen Dwyer [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], from Wikimedia Commons

John Stephen Dwyer [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], from Wikimedia Commons

And because our campus is located very conveniently in Chinatown, be sure to check out the Chinese New Year Parade! It’s the largest annual celebration in Boston’s Chinatown with lion dancers, music, and firecrackers—and if you haven’t tried the plethora of food options in our neighborhood, what a better time to venture out and celebrate? This year’s parade will be held on Sunday, March 1st and is FREE!  Click here to learn more.

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In honor of Black History Month, we would like to let you know about Boston to Mound Bayou: Columbia Point & Delta Health Center, a guide to the Hirsh Library’s archival materials documenting Tufts’ role in supporting the Delta Health Center. One of the nation’s earliest community-health-centers, the Delta Health Center remains a shining example of community self-determination born of the civil right struggle of the 1960′s. Based in Mound Bayou, Mississippi, “a tiny, all-black town founded by an ex-slave in the heart of the Mississippi Delta,” Delta Health Center’s establishment was “…one of the major contributions of the civil rights struggle.”1

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Dr. H. Jack Geiger & Dr. John W. Hatch during construction on the Delta Health Center, 1968
Image credit: Daniel Bernstein/U.S. National Library of Medicine

Learn more at the Delta Health Center at Boston to Mound Bayou: Columbia Point & Delta Health Center: http://researchguides.library.tufts.edu/community_health You can also learn more about Drs. H. Jack Geiger and Count Gibson, TUSM faculty members who supported the establishment of the Delta Health Center in The Good Doctors: the Medical Committee for Human Rights and the Struggle for Social Justice in Health Care (available in the HHSL BookStacks WA 1 D617g 2009).

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References: 1.  Morgan B. Up from Mississippi. Tufts medicine : magazine of the Tufts University Medical Alumni Association. Spring 2003;62(2):17-26.

 

In observance of President’s Day, Hirsh Health Sciences Library will be open from 12pm-7pm on Monday, February 16. Enjoy your weekend and have Happy Valentine’s Day as well!

Noon