Currently viewing the tag: "electronic resources"

Here are a few quick informational tidbits on how the government shutdown may affect you and your research:

  • HNRCA is closed
  • PubMed, Ovid, NIH Reporter, NCBI, the CDC, Agricola and other databases relying on government data are not being updated and are not able to respond to inquiries
  • DOCLINE is down (no direct ordering of articles from PubMed/NLM)
  • Data.gov and other non-essential websites are shut down, for accessing data, try Data Citation Index through Web of Knowledge
  • Many government services are not being maintained or no longer allow access. Resources like PubMed are still running, but not being updated; and if hacked or broken, they may not be fixed in a timely manner. The libraries subscribe to many databases that provide access to the same information, but will be maintained and staffed since they are not government-run. For more on alternative resources to use in order to access government information, see the Tisch Library guide here: http://researchguides.library.tufts.edu/govshutdown
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The following eJournals are now available for the Tufts community, most as a direct result from requests by faculty and students.

Check out the latest:

Coming soon: 

Food, Culture & Society

 

The Collections department is happy to hear from you with suggestions on what to purchase and we try to fill as many requests as budget and licensing considerations allow.

Like to suggest a purchase? Contact Frances.Foret@tufts.edu or fill out our request form.

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pubmedhealth

 “But does it really work?”  In our sound-bite saturated news media, it’s difficult to discern which health studies demonstrate effectiveness and which studies do not. How do we know when medical news is evidence worth paying attention to – or – when it is just ‘print noise’?

PubMed Health is a service of the U.S. National Library of Medicine that was designed to help consumers and clinicians answer the question, “what works?” PubMed Health “specializes in reviews of clinical effectiveness research, with easy-to-read summaries for consumers as well as full technical reports.” It provides information on how to assess the research results as well as how to read health news.

One of the most valuable features of PubMed Health is “Behind the Headlines,” a joint project of the National Health Service and the U.S. National Library of Medicine. “Behind the Headlines” evaluates current medical news for accuracy and also describes how medical news stories come to acquire their “spin”.

Check out PubMed Health – it works!
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedhealth/

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