Posts by: Rebecca Morin

Hear ye, hear ye…

Due to planned maintenance and repairs, there will be NO POWER in the Medical Education building for 24 hours this weekend, and that includes all Library spaces.

The work is scheduled to begin at 6:00 pm Friday July 23 and planned to end at 6:00 pm Saturday July 24.

The Library will provide remote assistance on Saturday, 10:00 am – 6:00 pm; reach us here with any questions!

This might be the perfect excuse to frolic outside…the weather looks pretty nice!

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The day that so many have been waiting for has finally arrived!

As of April 19, 2021, adults in every U.S. state, Washington, D.C., and Puerto Rico are now eligible for a COVID-19 vaccine.

This is an exciting time for many of us, who have been waiting (possibly impatiently) for our shot. But with so many people clamoring for appointments, how can you secure an appointment for that sweet, sweet vaccine?

Here are some proven tips from your already-vaccinated friends at the Hirsh Health Sciences Library**:

Good luck and good health everyone!

**please note that these resources are listed for informational purposes, and the Hirsh Health Sciences Library is not affiliated with any site or service listed above.

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** Please enjoy this repost, chock-full of Boston Massacre info! While 2021’s social-distancing rules prevent Revolutionary Spaces from holding the annual reenactment in front of the Old State House, if you are interested in the events of 1770, Crispus Attucks Day, and the wider history of the fight for racial and social justice in Boston, join Revolutionary Spaces March 5th at 5:00 pm for Grief, Remembrance, Justice: the Boston Massacre Anniversary. This panel discussion will reflect on the legacy of Melnea Cass and will be held via Zoom. **

…Your estates and your freedom, your children and Wives; A story I’ll tell you that’s truth now indeed, And when you hear of it your hearts will bleed.

The above comes from A Verse Occasioned by the late horrid Massacre in King-Street, a broadside published in Boston in 1770 to express outrage over the events of the evening of March 5th, the event we now know as the Boston Massacre. On the evening of March 5, 1770, a row broke out in front of the Custom House on King Street (now State Street) in Boston. Accounts of what provoked the trouble are mixed, but most include a soldier striking a boy, and a mob of Bostonians replying by hurling both snowballs and insults at the soldier. As the crowd grew more hostile, more soldiers were called in, and eventually nine armed British soldiers faced a rowdy group of over 50 colonists. Eventually, the soldiers fired into the mob, and when the casualties were totaled, five men were dead and six more were injured. The events of that March evening were seized upon by Boston radicals, and spun to create even more animosity toward the Crown. One of the most famous pieces of propaganda is Paul Revere’s compelling (if inaccurate) depiction of the event, which circulated wildly in the spring of 1770.

Colored engraving of British soldiers wearing red coats firing into a crowd in front of the building now known as the Old State House in Boston. There is also a dog.

Paul Revere, “The Bloody Massacre in King-Street, March 5, 1770.” Boston, 1770. (Gilder Lehrman Collection)

Of course, this event took place a short walk from the Hirsh Health Sciences Library. Commemorate this event with a Boston Massacre Study Break! Start on the Freedom Trail, and visit the Boston Massacre Marker on the corner of State and Congress Streets, right near the Old State House. Head back toward campus on Tremont Street, and stop in at the Granary Burying Ground. You’ll find the grave marker for the victims of the Massacre next to Samuel Adams. You can also visit with John Hancock and Paul Revere while you’re there. As you follow Tremont toward Boylston Street, take a detour into Boston Common at Avery Street, and enjoy the beautiful Boston Massacre/Crispus Attucks Monument, erected in 1888.

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Okay, maybe there is no evidence that February is the worst month of the year. But here in Boston it’s often the coldest, snowiest month. The days are getting longer, but they’re still pretty darn short. Sitting in the sun, swimming in the ocean, warm evening breezes…they’ve never felt further away. And then there’s that pandemic.

If you’re anything like us, you’re looking at nearly a full year without travel, without far-flung friends and family, without baseball games or handshakes or hugs or parades. You’re sick of Zoom, and you have no idea what your classmates and instructors look like under their masks.

We’re here to remind you that you’re not alone! If you need to get out of the house, the Library is open for studying (social distancing and masks required). You can still request and check out books, including leisure reading for an escape. Librarians are available online for consults during regular hours, just visit us here to start a conversation!

Remember that the academic programs on campus have resources for you as well! GSBS students are encouraged to join a community of peers, while folks in the School of Medicine (including PHPD) are encouraged to reach out to Wellness Advisor (and Friend of HHSL) Sharon Snaggs for all of your student wellness and support needs. Dental Students? Your school has your back with Health and Wellness. And everyone on the Boston Health Sciences Campus is encouraged to take advantage of the services of the Student Advisory & Health Administration Office.

Off campus, remember to pay special attention to self-care during these difficult times. Don’t just take our word for it, self-care is good for your stress levels and quality of life.

Remember that we are right there with you! So try to get outside when you can, take advantage of the resources above, and look forward to the day we can see each other’s faces again.

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As Hannukah draws to a close, and we inch ever closer to the Solstice, to Christmas, to Kwanzaa, to Zartosht no-diso, the Hirsh Health Sciences Library wishes you health and happiness, and reminds you that we are here.

While our Holiday Hours are short, you can always email us at hhsl@tufts.edu any time of the day or night, and we’ll get back to you as soon as we can.

When the University reopens on January 4th, we’ll be there with the same level of online service that you have come to expect of HHSL. We’re still working from home but are available for reference consultations, quick questions, guest lectures, workshops, and anything else you can dream up for us. Visit us here for more information about our services, and stop by Ask Us anytime to call/email/chat with us.

 

 

 

**Please enjoy this repost from five years ago, as we now commemorate the 250th Anniversary of the Boston Massacre! The slate of events for the 2020 commemoration can be found here: https://www.bostonhistory.org/massacre250.**

You true SONS of LIBERTY, who value your Lives,
Your estates and your freedom your children and Wives ;
A story I’ll tell you that’s truth now indeed,
And when you hear of it your hearts it will bleed.

The above comes from A Verse Occasioned by the late horrid Massacre in King-Street, a broadside published in Boston in 1770 to express outrage over the events of the evening of March 5th, the event we now know as the Boston Massacre. On the evening of March 5, 1770, a row broke out in front of the Custom House on King Street (now State Street) in Boston. Accounts of what provoked the trouble are mixed, but most include a soldier striking a boy, and a mob of Bostonians replying by hurling both snowballs and insults at the soldier. As the crowd grew more hostile, more soldiers were called in, and eventually nine armed British soldiers faced a rowdy group of over 50 colonists. Eventually, the soldiers fired into the mob, and when the casualties were totaled, five men were dead and six more were injured. The events of that March evening were seized upon by Boston radicals, and spun to create even more animosity toward the Crown. One of the most famous pieces of propaganda is Paul Revere’s compelling (if inaccurate) depiction of the event, which circulated wildly in the spring of 1770.

Paul Revere, “The Bloody Massacre in King-Street, March 5, 1770.” Boston, 1770. (Gilder Lehrman Collection)

Of course, this event took place a short walk from the Hirsh Health Sciences Library. Commemorate this event with a Boston Massacre Study Break! Start on the Freedom Trail, and visit the Boston Massacre Marker on the corner of State and Congress Streets, right near the Old State House. Head back toward campus on Tremont Street, and stop in at the Granary Burying Ground. You’ll find the grave marker for the victims of the Massacre next to Samuel Adams. You can also visit with John Hancock and Paul Revere while you’re there. As you follow Tremont toward Boylston Street, take a detour into Boston Common at Avery Street, and enjoy the beautiful Boston Massacre/Crispus Attucks Monument, erected in 1888. If your interest is piqued, there is a full day of (ahem) “family friendly events” planned at the Old State House Museum, including activities for little ones and culminating in the annual reenactment of the Boston Massacre at 7:00 pm this Saturday.

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Happy 2020!

Each January brings an array of welcome changes…maybe you’re giving that whole Dry January thing a try (which might decrease alcohol consumption later in the year), or it’s a Whole30 for you, or maybe this is the year you run that marathon, since that new study in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology shows that those training for their first marathon may experience a reduction in vascular age.

But why do any of that when you can simply revel in the Medline Data Changes for 2020! Cheers!

So what sort of changes does 2020 bring to Medical Subject Headings?

97 terms were changed or deleted and replaced with current terminology (for example, Swaziland is now Eswatini, reflecting the official name change of the nation in 2018).

293 new MeSH headings and 2 new publication types joined the thesaurus this year as well. Some new headings of particular note to HHSL researchers include:

You can review the full list here: https://www.nlm.nih.gov/mesh/2020/download/2020NewMeSHheadingsSingleColumn.pdf.

For more information about using MeSH, please visit our guide to Advanced Searching Techniques.

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I know what you’re thinking.

“What the heck is Data Carpentry?” “What does Social Science have to do with woodworking?” “Is the Library trying to hoodwink me into building bookshelves?”

But wait, we’re not talking about this kind of carpentry…

We’re talking Data Carpentry, which is part of the larger Carpentries organization. Workshops presented under the umbrella of the Carpentries are designed to teach foundational coding and data science skills to researchers. The lessons are designed with data-intensive research in mind and no previous experience with any of the tools being taught is expected. You don’t even need to be a social scientist! Anyone wishing to learn the introductory computational skills needed for data management and analysis in a research environment is welcome to attend.

This FREE (yes free!) Data Carpentry workshop will cover R, OpenRefine, and best practices for working with Spreadsheets. You do not need any prior knowledge of these tools to attend. Come prepared to work, to ask questions, and learn along with your fellow carpenters. No, not THAT type of carpenter…

Carpenter Bee by Raghunath Thirumalaisamy is licensed under CC BY-NC 2.0

Join us on October 21 and 22, 2019 for this fun and informative workshop. Registration is FREE. For more information, the Code of Conduct, and to register, please go  here: https://tufts-carpentries.github.io/2019-10-21-tuftsHirsh/.

For more information about the Carpentries @ Tufts, visit us here.

 

It’s July, so it’s time to welcome our new crop of Interns, Residents, and Fellows of Tufts Medical Center and our affiliated programs!

Remember, House Staff of TMC and affiliated hospitals have full access to the research collections of the Hirsh Health Sciences Library (for questions about access, visit this page. We are happy to assist you with all of your library research needs, including access to Point of Care Tools, access to Guidelines, access to ebooks, and much more! We can help you with your literature searches, and work with you on bigger research projects as well (just fill out this Consultation form and we’ll get right back to you).

We are available during Library Open Hours to help with all of your questions, no matter how big or how small. Feel free to call us at 617.636.6705, email us at hhsl@tufts.edu,  or use our Chat feature to reach someone right away.

Welcome to Tufts, and we look forward to helping you navigate the next phase of your medical education!

 

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June 17, 2019 is the 244th anniversary of the Battle of Bunker Hill, an event we mark in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts as Bunker Hill Day. It falls just after Father’s Day this year, so instead of watching war reenactments on the History Channel, why not take Dad out to bone up on some local history?

  • Celebrate the belated birthday of Bunker Hill Hero Joseph Warren today or any day (his birthday is June 11) with a trip to his namesake landmark the Warren Tavern, a fine establishment dating back to 1780 and frequented back in the day by Warren’s good friend, Paul Revere.
  • Kick off the weekend early and celebrate a turning point in the Revolution by joining Mayor Marty Walsh at City Hall Plaza to witness the raising of the Bunker Hill Flag on June 14th at noon.
  • Visit Charlestown on Saturday June 15 for Bunker Hill Family Fun Day and a concert at the Monument. There will be music, art projects for kids, and much more. And it’s free! All Dads love free things!
  • Visit the Bunker Hill Monument for the “Decisive Day” guided tour offered by the Boston National Historic Park, which departs daily every half hour.
  • Head out to Quincy to the Adams National Historical Park on Monday June 17 for the special event “Bunker Hill to Penn’s Hill,” where you can learn about Abigail Adams and young John Quincy Adams, who watched the battle rage from ten miles away atop Penn’s Hill.

If you don’t have time to get out this weekend, here are the Top Ten Things You Should Know About Charlestown and the Battle of Bunker Hill according to our Head of Research & Instruction and Charlestown denizen, Becky Morin

1) The Battle of Bunker Hill was mostly fought on Breed’s Hill. That’s where the Monument is. Bunker Hill is actually taller and steeper, and is home to the lovely Saint Francis de Sales, a beautiful Roman Catholic church dedicated in 1862. If you don’t know which hill is which, we know you’re a tourist.

Bunker Hill Monument and Col. William Prescott statue

By Siddharth Mallya. CC BY-SA 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons

2) Charlestown was actually not part of the City of Boston when the Battle took place. Charlestown is OLDER than Boston (as any proud Townie will gladly inform you), and did not become part of the City until 1874.

3) Charlestown is where Paul Revere’s Midnight Ride really kicked off. He was ferried in a rowboat from Boston, landing near the Charlestown Battery, where he picked up a horse from his friend Deacon John Larkin, a lifelong Charlestown resident.

4) There is debate as to why the Colonial forces fortified Breed’s Hill instead of Bunker Hill, although many think it is because Breed’s Hill is closer to Boston. The British had planned the siege to capture Bunker Hill, as they wanted to dig in fortifications on the area’s highest points.

5) It took the British three attempts to capture Breed’s Hill, even though their numbers were far greater than the Colonial forces.

6) Charlestown burned after the Battle, the first of two major fires to strike the community.

7) Proud Charlestown residents still fly the Bunker Hill Battle Flag.

Bunker Hill Flag

By DevinCook at English Wikipedia, via Wikimedia Commons

8) While the British defeated the Colonists at the Battle of Bunker Hill, they suffered severe casualties and the Siege of Boston came to a stalemate.

9) The Bunker Hill Monument (which you now know is on Breed’s Hill) is 221 feet tall and was completed in 1842.

10) Beloved French hero of the American Revolution, the Marquis de Lafayette, is said to be buried beneath a sprinkling of soil from Bunker Hill, procured by his son.

Want More?

http://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/the-true-story-of-the-battle-of-bunker-hill-36721984/
http://charlestownhistoricalsociety.org/history/historic-timeline/
https://www.masshist.org/revolution/bunkerhill.php
https://memory.loc.gov/ammem/today/jun17.html

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