“Library in the Medical and Dental School Building”, 1907. From the Tufts Digital Library: http://hdl.handle.net/10427/38004

Everyone here at the Hirsh Health Sciences Library would like to welcome the new medical class of 2021! We look forward to meeting you at library orientation today, August 8th, where you’ll get the chance to learn more about the library and all the resources that are available to you. (We’ve had a few renovations since the photo above was taken in 1907).

Your pre-clinical liaison librarian is Christina Heinrich, so don’t hesitate to contact her if you have any questions or need any library help!

 

Hope everyone has had a chance to browse the book-truck of FREE BOOKS down by the Circulation desk. Since we’ve been getting rid of some books, we’ve also added a great number of new releases to our collection. Below is a selection of recent Non-Fiction titles to come in. They can all be found either at the New Books display on the 4th floor of Sackler or up in the 5th floor book stacks:

The Radium Girls : The Dark Story of America’s Shining Women

Women’s Health in Primary Care

Healing Children : A Surgeon’s Stories From the Frontiers of Pediatric Medicine

Obesity Medicine : Management of Obesity in Women’s Health Care

Cure Unknown : Inside the Lyme Epidemic

Hundreds of Interlaced Fingers : A Kidney Doctor’s Search for the Perfect Match

Open Heart : A Cardiac Surgeon’s Stories of Life and Death on the Operating Table

Diagnosis : Interpreting the Shadows

As always, if there’s a book we don’t have that you think we should own, please do let us know by recommending a purchase.

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Two book-trucks full of FREE BOOKS! Atlases, flashcards, textbooks, fiction and more! There’s something here for everyone. Stop by the Circulation desk on the 4th floor of the Sackler building, and see if you can give one or more of these lonely books a good home.

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We want to extend a warm welcome to the new UG students starting today and a belated but no less enthusiastic welcome to our new PG students! The library has quiet places for studying (and naps), collaboration space, and a café, which means, yes, you can eat and drink here.

  • Have a question? Drop by the Service Desk on the 4th floor and chat to the librarian on call.
  • Want more extended one-on-one help? Schedule an appointment with the dental librarian, Amanda Nevius.
  • Speaking of Amanda, be sure to bookmark the Dental Resources she’s put together for TUSDM. It includes goodies like information on Board and Licensure Exam study resources, how to find Materials Research, and tips on conducting excellent EBD searches.
  • Forget your charger and your phone’s about to die? Check one out at the Service Desk. For that matter, check out a laptop, a VGI cable, model teeth, real skulls, and more!

We wish you nothing but success here at Tufts and everyone at the library looks forward to getting to know you better!

 

Post contributed by Amanda Nevius

 

 

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https://www.cityofboston.gov/311/

Image Source: https://www.cityofboston.gov/311/

 

As classes begin to pick up again, we wanted to share a resource that the City of Boston offers its residents. Street light out on your walk home? Trash not picked up? Report it easily with BOS: 311 , a service created by the city of Boston to make sure that these issues are taken care of. Become a neighborhood reporter by calling 311, downloading the app, tweeting to the city, or submitting a report on the site. There are similar programs in Somerville and Cambridge as well. Live somewhere else? Let us know if your town has a service!

Issue in the library? Tell us! Report it at the Library Service Desk on the 4th floor or choose your preferred method of contacting us on our homepage under “Ask Us”.

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There is no better time to pick up new skills for the upcoming school year than now!

Tufts University subscribes to Lynda.com, which is a free online video-tutorial resource available to Tufts University students, faculty, and staff. It provides training in software such Microsot Office, Adobe products, data analysis and visualization tools, in addition to programming languages, and topics found under these broad categories:

  • 3D + Animation
  • Audio + Music
  • Business
  • CAD
  • Design
  • Developer
  • Education + Elearning
  • IT
  • Marketing
  • Photography
  • Video
  • Web

You can refine your skills in teaching techniques, public speaking, IT security, improve written communication, accounting, new standards, leadership skills, accessibility, how to use specific software and the list goes on! Lynda.com also offers learning paths that include a succession of videos on a focused topic.

To access Lynda.com and for more information, go to:  https://it.tufts.edu/lyndacampus or login by clicking the graphic below!

 

Post contributed by Berika Williams

 

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Hello everyone! It’s been a bit since the last time I did an annual round-up of the data I have for the library, and I thought it was high time to do another one. Especially given how much things have changed these last few years. And what interesting changes!

First thing is first, of course: what were the fullest days in the library this past year? There are actually two answers! On both December 6th and April 4th we counted 950 people sitting in the library. 950! That’s nuts! A neat side fact: both of those days are Tuesdays, and both were the Tuesday after the second weekend of Extended Hours in their respective semester. Either blind chance was on our side those days, or Tufts is big on keeping the same exam style no matter what. Go figure.

Incidentally, this year I became curious about how busy the floors were when compared with each other. The answer is this rather silly looking chart.

See that purple there? That’s the 7th floor. It was twice as busy as the 6th floor. Twice! We counted people 35,000 times on the 7th floor this last year! The others don’t even come close. Obviously, part of this can be explained by the fact that we added so much new furniture last year, but that’s not the entire story. I think it’s safe to say that students around here just really like their quiet space to study.

“But Tom,” you ask, “how do these kinds of numbers compare with past years?” Well I’m glad you asked that, HHSL Blog Reading Person, because I have an answer for you! The chart below is the total number of people we’ve counted in the library, by month, over the last 4 years.

The purple would be this year. It looks like a lot, but you can see the same sort of wave formation every single year – we start off slow in the summer, get busy in the fall, slow down in the winter (we only get about half of December’s days counted due to the break, and January starts off slowly anyway), and then the whole thing picks back up in time for all the exams, only to slow back down in June.

What does this tell us, then? Well, we’ve been busy. We’ve been very busy. As you can see, everything sort of spiked back in 2014-2015, but this year was consistently busier than the year before it. July and August were the exceptions, but I’m certain that March and April more than make up for those.

Seeing these numbers go up and down over the years presents an interesting thought challenge: why do they fluctuate so much? Well, a little of it is human error, a little bit is due to changes in how we collect this data, a little of it is the way the programs on campus have been changing and adapting (which means the student body has been adapting), and part of it is sheer environmental factors. Snow days, for instance, or the way holidays fall – if we’re closed, we won’t be counting anybody!

“Okay Tom, I see. How about circulation? Surely human error is minimized when you have a program doing all your counting for you.”

Note: We got a new circulation system in June 2017, so the numbers got interrupted.

You would be right. And you’re about to really enter the head-scratcher.

Somehow we were insanely full this year, while also having our second slowest year of checkouts since we started collecting these numbers this way. We have a ton of new resources for you, but circulation is down? Let me share the secret answer: the Internet. HHSL is constantly searching out new digital books, journals, and databases for everyone on campus, which means our physical books are not in as high demand as they used to be. So while the overall circulation is down, what is circulating is getting checked out like mad – for instance, our phone chargers alone registered 8,000 checkouts this year. The busiest year yet for them!

In case you were curious (I know you were) the most checkouts we had in a single day was 210 checkouts, which belongs to Wednesday, October 5th. 9 out of the 10 busiest circulation days were in the fall (with February 27th clocking in at #7). That particular information doesn’t really tell us much, but it’s fun to know all the same.

For the record, “busiest circulation day” is only in reference to amounts of checkouts (and subsequent check-ins) in a given day. It doesn’t count all of the times that librarians have a consultation with someone to help with research, or the times that the library staff at the Service Desk troubleshoot or help you find articles, or all the direction given, or printing problems fixed, or on-the-fly assistance with programs like EndNote…it’s a helpful metric, but it’s not the full story. Heck, it’s missing the craft events! You can’t have a complete picture without those.

All of these numbers are pieces to a puzzle, and it’s one we’re always working on here. You’re looking at a few pieces of it, but there are always more to add. And we’re always looking for more of those pieces, be it anything mentioned above or be it School Affiliation data. So as we enter the 2017-2018 year, keep your eye open for people walking around with clipboards and say hi! And who knows, maybe you’ll be part of one of these charts in the future.

-Tom-

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This summer we’ve added a ton of leisure reading books to our collection. In addition to current bestsellers, we’ve been expanding the Classics and Non-Fiction sections. Below is a selection of the latest titles to come in. They can all be found on the 4th floor of the Sackler:

 

NON-FICTION

Papi: My Story by PAPI!

I Can’t Make This Up: Life Lessons by Kevin Hart

Year of Yes! by Shonda Rhimes

 

FICTION

Camino Island by John Grisham

The Heirs: A Novel by Susan Rieger

Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine by Gail Honeyman

Trajectory by Richard Russo

Chemistry: A Novel by Weike Wang

Into the Water by Paula Hawkins

Men Without Women: Stories by Haruki Murakami

Reconstructing Amelia: A Novel by Kimberly McCreight

 

CLASSICS

Oil! by Upton Sinclair

The Jungle: The Uncensored Original Edition by Upton Sinclair

Oliver Twist by Charles Dickens

East of Eden by John Steinbeck

Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck

The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas

The Black Tulip by Alexandre Dumas

A Farewell to Arms by Ernest Hemingway

The Old Man and the Sea by Ernest Hemingway

Siddhartha by Hermann Hesse

Demian: The Story of Emil Sinclair’s Youth by Hermann Hesse

 

As always, if there’s a book we don’t have that you think we should own, please do let us know by recommending a purchase.

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Working on a cover letter? Stumped about starting your personal statement? Finishing up your thesis? Never fear, Health Sciences Writing Consultants is here! We interrupt our usual summer hiatus to bring you three special Thursdays where our consultant will be available to advise you on your writing projects.

On 7/20, 7/27, and 8/3, there will be four appointments available between 10:30am and 1:30pm. For more information or to register for an appointment please visit the Health Sciences Writing Consultants LibGuide.

Regular sessions will resume in mid-August–stay tuned!

https://pixabay.com/en/swan-boats-pond-park-670898/

image source: https://pixabay.com/en/swan-boats-pond-park-670898/

To all the new residents on campus, welcome to Tufts’ Boston campus. We’re just around the corner from the Boston Garden, AMC Loews Movie Theater, Boston Opera House, Primark and don’t even get us started on the food.

The library service desk is located on the 4th floor by the Food for Thought Cafe. Come visit us, we’re happy to help you check out books, laptops, chargers, and anatomical models. Doing research and not getting the results you’re looking for? Stop by to meet with an on call librarian or select your favorite way to contact us from our home page.

Don’t forget to watch for your username and password — it will be coming in the mail sometime in the fall.