Currently viewing the tag: "open workshop"

Once upon a time, librarians curated what were usually called “picture collections.” These were files (actual paper files!) filled with pictures clipped from other sources that the librarians knew could be reused in articles and publications- hence the origin of the term “clip art.” When an author was working to pull together a publication, he or she would mosey over to the library or archives and work with this curated picture collection.

Then the internet happened. The wealth of images available online has created a minefield of intellectual property and academic ethics issues. Just because you can view content online for free (whether it be photos on Flickr or a copy of someone’s thesis) does not mean you can download, remix, reuse, sell commercially, or do anything you want with it. Content creators have rights.

Creative Commons licenses are a component of the open access toolkit that allows authors and creators to share their content while maintaining some important essential and creative rights to their works. In other words, issuing work under a CC license gives you the ability to freely share your work, under terms that you dictate. This differs from the public domain, which dictates that nobody owns a piece of content, and is a matter for another blog post, another day.

There are six Creative Commons licenses, which offer differing levels of reuse permission (the most common restrictions involve changing or adapting images, and making money from the reuse of images). CC has a handy tool to help creators determine what sort of license they would like to use.

When it comes to finding images licensed under Creative Commons, there are several great resources to visit and tricks to use to find images for your posters, presentations, and publications.

I suggest starting with Flickr. After you execute a search you can limit your results to Creative Commons only, as well as images that allow commercial reuse and modifications:

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Once you’ve done that, you can view the specific rights for any image by clicking the Rights link (this also tells you what you are allowed to do with an image):

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Google Images allows a similar search limit. After you search, select your parameters under the “Usage Rights” menu:

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With all Creative Commons works, you are expected to attribute the creator and source (at the very least), and CC has a great guide to Best Practices for Attribution.

This is just a quick introduction to Creative Commons resources. If you have any questions, please contact us at hhsl@tufts.edu. Even better, attend our upcoming Open Workshop on October 30 at noon, “But I Found it Online!” Proper Use and Attribution of Images for Papers, Posters, and Presentations.” Click here for more details and to register!

Now that everyone is back on campus and settled into their routine, the HHSL is beginning our Open Workshop series on Thursdays from noon-1pm in Sackler 510. These one hour classes are open to anyone affiliated with Tufts University or the Hirsh Health Sciences Library, and cover a wide range of relevant and interesting topics.

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Our kick-off event is this Thursday, and will include snacks, as we take you through some of the most popular FAQs about using and accessing the library resources. You can find all of the upcoming classes and their descriptions on our Open Workshops calendar page.

Registration is required for the workshops, and you are absolutely allowed to eat and drink responsibly in the computer lab!

Come learn with us!

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Get Published! Tools for Managing your Writing

Join us Thursday 3/13 at noon in Sackler 510 for the next installment of our Open Workshops series. During this hour-long workshop, you will learn how to use library resources and tools to manage your writing from conception to publication.

Resources covered include:

  • making effective use of citation management tools
  • databases to find journal impact factors
  • suggested apps, guidelines, and tips to keep track of your research

Space is limited–be sure to arrive on time for a seat! Food and lidded drinks are allowed in the computer labs so feel free to bring your lunch or a snack.

 HHSL Open Workshops are open to ANY Tufts community member. We welcome students, faculty, staff, clinicians and members of our affiliate hospitals. 

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Join us this Thursday afternoon from noon to 1pm for an introduction to the best database you may never have heard of – Web of Science! Food and lidded drinks are allowed in the computer labs, so bring your lunch or a snack.

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Beyond PubMed: Web of Science
Thur, Feb 27th, Noon-1:00pm
Sackler 510

Cross disciplinary subject? Not sure of where to go after you search PubMed? Have you written an article and want to know who has quoted you? This workshop is for you! We will learn

- how to construct a keyword search
- show how finding one good article on a topic can lead to other articles on the same thing;
- and find out who is also working on your topic of interest.

Web of Science will become your new best friend for research!

Space is limited, so please register here by February 26th.

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Join the Hirsh Health Sciences Library this Wednesday, October 16th, for a workshop on how to find and interpret Impact Factors!

This workshop is open to all Tufts students, faculty, and staff affiliates and will be in Room 510 of the Sackler Building from 12-1pm

Space is limited, so we ask you fill out a brief registration form HERE by 5pm on the 15th.

Hope to see you there!

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