Institute for Business in the Global Context

Where the World of Business Meets the World

Category: MIB (page 1 of 5)

Three People. Two Questions. One Degree. – Focus on Alternative Energy

Our Master of International Business alumni step out of Fletcher into fascinating careers across sectors and geographies. Our new series, “Three People. Two Questions. One Degree.,” features MIB alumni working in a common industry who bring a unique Fletcher perspective to their organizations. Through a pair of questions, they look back at their time at Fletcher and forward to the future:

THREE PEOPLE


Christopher Hickey '13
Enel Green Power
Business Development Director

Boston, MA

Ravi Manghani '10
Greentech Media
Director, Energy Storage

Boston, MA

Alexander Schulte '16
BlueWave Solar
Director, Business Development

Boston, MA

TWO QUESTIONS

  • What did you learn at Fletcher that is most relevant to your career today?
  • How has the outlook for alternative energy changed over the past few years?

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Three People. Two Questions. One Degree. – Focus on Business for Impact

Our Master of International Business alumni step out of Fletcher into fascinating careers across sectors and geographies. Our new series, “Three People. Two Questions. One Degree.,” features MIB alumni working in a common industry who bring a unique Fletcher perspective to their organizations. Through a pair of questions, they look back at their time at Fletcher and forward to the future:

THREE PEOPLE


Zandile Lambu ‘17
Circle
Compliance Specialist

Boston, MA

Jesse Simmons ‘16
Align Impact
Investment Analyst

Santa Monica, CA

Ammar Karimjee '17
One Acre Fund
Impact Ventures Associate

Tanzania

TWO QUESTIONS

  • What did you learn at Fletcher that is most relevant to your career today?
  • What idea/innovation gives you the most hope for helping those at the bottom of the pyramid?

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Three People. Two Questions. One Degree. – Focus on Technology & Innovation

Our Master of International Business alumni step out of Fletcher into fascinating careers across sectors and geographies. Our new series, “Three People. Two Questions. One Degree.” features MIB alumni working in a common industry who bring a unique Fletcher perspective to their organizations. Through a pair of questions, they look back at their time at Fletcher and forward to the future.

THREE PEOPLE


Shailesh Chitnis ‘10
Compile
Vice President of Marketing

Bangalore, India

Sarah Ryan ‘13
SONOS
Global Commercial Insights

Boston, MA

David Rottblatt ‘11
Embraer
Business Development Director

San Francisco, CA

TWO QUESTIONS

  • What did you learn at Fletcher that is most relevant to your career today?
  • What innovation do you think will impact businesses most over the next 5 to 10 years?

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William L. Clayton Professor of International Economic Affairs Michael W. Klein sits down with James Stavridis, Dean of The Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, to discuss Econofact, the non-partisan publication co-founded by Klein and colleague, Prof. Edward Schumacher-Matos. Econofact, launched in January 2017, now boasts a network of over 70 contributing economists and is designed to bring key facts and incisive analysis to the national debate on economic and social policies.

Why We Need Traditional Banking

This now-standard tallying of the benefits and risks of securitization omits the costs involved in the decline of old-fashioned banking itself. And those costs are quite significant. A financial system that downgrades the role of banks becomes dangerously dependent on nearly blind trust in generic credit scores — a risk still underappreciated even a decade after the financial crisis. The marginalization of traditional banking also discourages lending to small businesses, which are essential to America’s economic dynamism. And it tends to over-centralize the supply of money, and therefore of credit, in ways that distort our economic life.

Instead of applauding the greater “completeness” of anonymous debt markets, we should lament the marginalization of traditional banking. And we should work to reverse it.

Read the full piece from Prof. Amar Bhidé in National Affairs

Fletcher Faculty Features: Jette Steen Knudsen – “Visible Hands: Government Regulation and International Business Responsibility”

From time to time we like to feature the recent work of a number of our esteemed business faculty here at The Fletcher School. The series continues with Jette Steen Knudsen, Professor of Policy & International Business and Shelby Cullom Davis Chair in Sustainability at The Fletcher School.


The latest work from Professor of Policy & International Business and Shelby Cullom Davis Chair in Sustainability, Jette Steen Knudsen, examines the changing relationship between the regulator environment across the globe and the corporate social responsibility (CSR) initiatives of multinational corporations. Learn more:

https://target.scene7.com/is/image/Target/53000053?wid=520&hei=520&fmt=pjpegVisible Hands:  Government Regulation and International Business Responsibility
by Jette Steen Knudsen & Jeremy Moon

A growing number of states are regulating the corporate social responsibility (CSR) of domestic multinational corporations relating to overseas subsidiaries and suppliers. In this book, Jette Steen Knudsen and Jeremy Moon offer a new framework for analysing government–CSR relations: direct and indirect policies for CSR. Arguing that existing research on CSR regulation fails to address the growing role of the state in shaping the international practices of multinational corporations, the authors provide insight into the CSR issues that are addressed by government policies. Drawing on case studies, they analyse three key examples of CSR: non-financial reporting, ethical trade and tax transparency in extractive industries. In doing so, they propose a new research agenda of government and CSR that is relevant to scholars and graduate students in CSR, sustainability, political economy and economic sociology, as well as policymakers and consultants in international development and trade.

Learn more about this exciting new work from Prof. Knudsen

Fletcher Reads the Newspaper: Is Brexit a “house of cards” that threatens the stability of the world order?

The latest edition of “Fletcher Reads the Newspaper” tackled the thorny question: Is Brexit a “house of cards” that threatens the stability of the world order? After introductions by Bhaskar Chakravorti, Senior Associate Dean of International Business and Finance at The Fletcher School, and Lisbeth L. Tarlow, Chair of The Fletcher School Board of Overseers, the two debaters kicked off.

Lord Michael Dobbs Speaks to the Fletcher Audience as part of Fletcher Reads the Newspaper

Lord Michael Dobbs, introduced as “Westminster’s baby-faced hitman,” wasted no time attacking the premise of stability to begin with. He claimed global stability disappeared at least twenty years ago. The seasoned debater laid out the three-part argument that a) there is no stable world order b) the EU is the cause of instability and c) the EU failed the challenge of changing internally due to its undemocratic nature. Countering the common narrative that the UK left the EU for economic reasons, Dobbs insisted that the UK left to reclaim its sovereignty, which has been compromised by an “arrogant, authoritarian, inefficient, ineffective, and elitist” EU that refused to reform itself. According to Dobbs, the democratic deficit generated by decision-making in Brussels by unelected representatives is irreconcilable, and the EU itself is in danger of becoming a “house of cards.”

Dr. Amar Bhidé, after excusing himself for this “hopelessly mismatched debate” took a different approach, borrowing a page from British economist John Kay to illustrate the perils of Brexit using the example of regulation on jam. Bhidé demonstrated how the trade and safety regulations so lamented by the pro-Brexit camp in fact will not be eliminated by leaving the EU, and are actually made less burdensome by unifying standards across the region. He went on to extend the jam example to immigration, claiming that Brexit is really about the flow of people, which also will not end with Brexit and is arguably much more important to the economy than the flow of jam.

Watch the full debate between Lord Dobbs and Prof. Bhidé on the Fletcher School Facebook page

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Support Fletcher this #GivingTuesday!

UPDATE:

250 DONORS for $50,000–CRUSHED

#TuftsGivingTuesday–one day, global impact.

It’s no understatement: we CRUSHED our goals.

We are beyond thankful for everything that thousands of people did make this the largest giving day in Fletcher and Tufts history.

Thank you for volunteering. Thank you for donating.

And thank you for supporting today’s students and faculty and the tremendous academic and global community that is Fletcher. Together, we’re making a brighter world.


Today is #GivingTuesday! Learn why Dean Bhaskar Chakravorti is giving to Fletcher, and consider joining him with your own gift. If 250 people give to Fletcher today, we unlock a special $50,000 challenge gift!

MIB Alumna Kelly Liu (F’16) Quoted in CNET

Another day, another MIB working at the intersection of business and world affairs! Kelly Liu, supply chain manager at Dell and a 2016 MIB grad, was quoted in CNET on the fight to stop child labor abuses in Congolese cobalt mines. Check out the story!

That sentiment was shared by Kelly Liu, a supply chain manager at Dell. She said her company has been working closely with Huayou Cobalt and conducted a survey with its suppliers and shared its template with other companies as well.

“We recognize this is a complex issue, and this is probably going to be marathon and not a sprint in order to create positive change,” she said.

Read the full article in CNET

 

Real Leaders Negotiate: Fletcher Professor Jes Salacuse Discusses New Book at Ginn Library

The Fletcher School is no stranger to literature involving leadership and negotiation. As professor and former Fletcher dean Jeswald Salacuse noticed, however, these two genres often fail to address one another. Rather, leadership and negotiation are often treated as subjects unto themselves: matters of vision and drive on the one hand, and agreements and alternatives on the other.

Drawing on his experience in academic and private-sector leadership, Salacuse came to the following conclusion: “To lead is to negotiate.” Contrary to popular opinion, leadership is not simply a matter of developing a vision and then cracking the whip. The act of leadership certainly involves vision and execution, but the journey of leadership fundamentally involves negotiation at every stage, he said.

Salacuse traces that journey in a new book, Real Leaders Negotiate!: Gaining, Using, and Keeping the Power to Lead Through Negotiation (Palgrave MacMillan, 2017), which he presented to the Fletcher community in a book talk sponsored by Ginn Library on Nov. 1. Building on his insights, Salacuse’s book unites leadership and negotiation literature and distills from them frameworks, strategies and tactics for negotiating the journey of leadership.

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