Institute for Business in the Global Context

Where the World of Business Meets the World

Tag: MIB (page 1 of 5)

Three People. Two Questions. One Degree. – Focus on Alternative Energy

Our Master of International Business alumni step out of Fletcher into fascinating careers across sectors and geographies. Our new series, “Three People. Two Questions. One Degree.,” features MIB alumni working in a common industry who bring a unique Fletcher perspective to their organizations. Through a pair of questions, they look back at their time at Fletcher and forward to the future:

THREE PEOPLE


Christopher Hickey '13
Enel Green Power
Business Development Director

Boston, MA

Ravi Manghani '10
Greentech Media
Director, Energy Storage

Boston, MA

Alexander Schulte '16
BlueWave Solar
Director, Business Development

Boston, MA

TWO QUESTIONS

  • What did you learn at Fletcher that is most relevant to your career today?
  • How has the outlook for alternative energy changed over the past few years?

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Three People. Two Questions. One Degree. – Focus on Business for Impact

Our Master of International Business alumni step out of Fletcher into fascinating careers across sectors and geographies. Our new series, “Three People. Two Questions. One Degree.,” features MIB alumni working in a common industry who bring a unique Fletcher perspective to their organizations. Through a pair of questions, they look back at their time at Fletcher and forward to the future:

THREE PEOPLE


Zandile Lambu ‘17
Circle
Compliance Specialist

Boston, MA

Jesse Simmons ‘16
Align Impact
Investment Analyst

Santa Monica, CA

Ammar Karimjee '17
One Acre Fund
Impact Ventures Associate

Tanzania

TWO QUESTIONS

  • What did you learn at Fletcher that is most relevant to your career today?
  • What idea/innovation gives you the most hope for helping those at the bottom of the pyramid?

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Three People. Two Questions. One Degree. – Focus on Technology & Innovation

Our Master of International Business alumni step out of Fletcher into fascinating careers across sectors and geographies. Our new series, “Three People. Two Questions. One Degree.” features MIB alumni working in a common industry who bring a unique Fletcher perspective to their organizations. Through a pair of questions, they look back at their time at Fletcher and forward to the future.

THREE PEOPLE


Shailesh Chitnis ‘10
Compile
Vice President of Marketing

Bangalore, India

Sarah Ryan ‘13
SONOS
Global Commercial Insights

Boston, MA

David Rottblatt ‘11
Embraer
Business Development Director

San Francisco, CA

TWO QUESTIONS

  • What did you learn at Fletcher that is most relevant to your career today?
  • What innovation do you think will impact businesses most over the next 5 to 10 years?

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Fletcher Team Named Regional CFA Challenge Champs!

Originally posted on Fletcher Admissions Blog

Great news for our students: Fletcher’s team in the CFA Institute Research Challenge emerged as champions in last night’s Boston-region competition!  Presenting their research on the company Boston Scientific, the Fletcher team topped competitors Babson College, Brandeis University, and Hult International in the final round.

The winning team consisted of JP Craven (first-year MIB), Doris Hernandez (second-year MALD), Ashray Dixit (second-year MIB), and our own Admissions Bloggers Mariya and AdiProfessor Patrick Schena was advisor to the team and Office of Career Services Director Elana Givens added her input and attended the competition, as did Dean Bhaskar Chakravorti.

The next round of the challenge will be the North and South Americas regional competition (coincidentally) in Boston on March, with about 50 teams competing.  The winner of the regional competition will go to the global competition in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia in April.

Congratulations to Professor Schena and the successful team!

Why We Need Traditional Banking

This now-standard tallying of the benefits and risks of securitization omits the costs involved in the decline of old-fashioned banking itself. And those costs are quite significant. A financial system that downgrades the role of banks becomes dangerously dependent on nearly blind trust in generic credit scores — a risk still underappreciated even a decade after the financial crisis. The marginalization of traditional banking also discourages lending to small businesses, which are essential to America’s economic dynamism. And it tends to over-centralize the supply of money, and therefore of credit, in ways that distort our economic life.

Instead of applauding the greater “completeness” of anonymous debt markets, we should lament the marginalization of traditional banking. And we should work to reverse it.

Read the full piece from Prof. Amar Bhidé in National Affairs

MIB Alumna Kelly Liu (F’16) Quoted in CNET

Another day, another MIB working at the intersection of business and world affairs! Kelly Liu, supply chain manager at Dell and a 2016 MIB grad, was quoted in CNET on the fight to stop child labor abuses in Congolese cobalt mines. Check out the story!

That sentiment was shared by Kelly Liu, a supply chain manager at Dell. She said her company has been working closely with Huayou Cobalt and conducted a survey with its suppliers and shared its template with other companies as well.

“We recognize this is a complex issue, and this is probably going to be marathon and not a sprint in order to create positive change,” she said.

Read the full article in CNET

 

MIB Candidate Adi on his Summer Internship as a Banker

Originally post on the Fletcher admissions blog, a home for lots of great content from the Fletcher community!!

At one point during my first year at Fletcher, someone told me that, in the end, everything was going to be o.k.  Everyone will do something during the summer break, be it an internship, research, writing, or catching up with old friends and family for two or three months.  As much as I wanted to believe that, I couldn’t help but get a little nervous when it was a couple of weeks after the last final of the spring semester, summer had officially started, and there was still no official offer letter for a summer internship.  I even flew back home to Indonesia, not knowing whether I was going to intern at all during the next few months, or just plain relax (or maybe start writing my capstone).

Adi (in the red shirt) and the CCB team at Citi Indonesia

Then the moment I had been waiting for finally arrived.  I was offered a spot in the Global Consumer Summer Associate batch at Citigroup’s Jakarta office.  While extremely relieved, I also came to realize that now the hard work would start.  This would be my first exposure to working at a global corporation, first time at a financial institution, in an industry far away from my previous professional background.  I was put on the Commercial Lending team.  My role was to support the business analysis and marketing staff in the division.  My main deliverable was an official guide for new employees of Citi Commercial Bank (CCB).  This meant that I had to learn how CCB operates, understand the complete business process down to the individual roles of each person on the team, and package all this information into a guidebook that would be easily digestible to a newcomer.

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After the Wall Street crash of 2008, Fabian Olarte (MIB ’11) found himself seeking a new career path. He decided there was no better place to do so than at The Fletcher School, and is grateful for the warm, helpful community he found at the school: “A lot of people helped me get my job and helped me advance in my career, and I’m doing the same for them.”

Student Research: Boosting Intra-Africa Trade in East Africa

by Utsav Mulay (MIB 2018)

Prior to travel and while in Rwanda, I identified access to energy, or lack thereof, as a major driver for growth in trade in East Africa. Energy is crucial for building capital-intensive infrastructure, such as roads, railways, bridges, and power plants, and I was curious about the status of this in Rwanda, the most stable and fast-growing country in East Africa. I made a list of important stakeholders in energy in the Rwandan government as well as the private sector, to be contacted and possibly interviewed for their views on energy status in Rwanda and its greater implications across East Africa.

Once in Rwanda, I contacted the Rwanda Development Board to meet their CEO, Clare Akamanzi, as well as their Energy Specialists. Clare was busy due to the elections in Rwanda, but I was able to meet Olivier Ngororabanga, an Industrial Development Analyst in the Investment Promotion Department of the Rwanda Development Board. He was helpful in briefing me about interesting developments surrounding energy in Rwanda.

By 2017/18, the Rwandan government planned to give access to 70% of the population from an earlier 34.5%. This would be achieved by 48% on-grid and 22% off-grid. As a large proportion of Rwanda’s population, almost 10 million people, live in villages, I was interested in what kind of off-grid solutions were being provided – this would be critical to understanding the kind of light industries that could be supported in rural Rwanda and give an understanding of potential income increase for many people. The Rwandan government had set a goal of increasing the per capita income to $900 by 2020 and this would not be possible without providing energy access to the population residing in villages. I observed that the Rwandan government had a tiered system of classification for implementing rural electrification; Tier 4 and Tier 5 would be critical installations needed to support businesses. Continue reading

New Research from Jette Steen Knudsen: Government Regulation and International CSR

Government Regulation of International Corporate Social Responsibility in the US and the UK: How Domestic Institutions Shape Mandatory and Supportive Initiatives
by Jette Steen Knudsen

Abstract

While most scholarship on corporate social responsibility (CSR) focuses on company-level CSR initiatives, it increasingly also examines government programs for CSR. However, research on how governments contribute to CSR has mainly focused on domestic and not international CSR challenges. This literature also does not specify whether governments shape CSR through mandatory regulation or supportive initiatives. This article adopts a processtracing approach to determine how governments regulate international CSR. It demonstrates that the legal and political systems in the liberal market economies of theUK and theUS lead to different forms of public CSR regulation—notably in the areas of labour standards in apparel and tax transparency in extractives. The UK government has been more likely to support bottom-up collaborative multi-stakeholder initiatives, whereas the US government has favoured top-down mandatory regulation.

Download and read the full paper from the British Journal of Industrial Relations

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