Currently viewing the tag: "Fletcher Forum"

Fletcher is a busy place and blog readers are busy people.  How to keep up with everything going on here?  Well, there are many different sources, and the best one depends on how you prefer to receive your news.

For starters, there’s the front page of the Fletcher web site.  The Communications folk put newsworthy stuff up there regularly, and you can find more details on their web page.  For general university info, which may include stories on Fletcher, check out the news page of the Tufts University site, or for a student perspective, the Tufts Daily.  As a former college newspaper writer myself, I’d say the Daily staff does a good job, particularly for a small university with a limited pool of journalists.

Those who prefer to have their news fed to them can “like” Fletcher, as well as Fletcher Admissions, on Facebook.  Once you’re a student, you can even join me and 960+ others by friending Tufts President Anthony MonacoHe tweets, too   As does Fletcher.

If measuring thoughts by character, Twitter style, doesn’t appeal to you, check out Fletcher’s publications to find out what our best student and faculty minds are thinking.  There’s the Fletcher Forum, Praxis, and Al Nakhlah.  For that matter, Praxis and the Fletcher Forum have their own Facebook pages.

Naturally, I want to remind you to read the Admissions Blog regularly.  In fact, you should arrange to keep up with the blog via email or RSS feed.  (Shift your eyes over to the left, and you’ll see the Feedburner box where you can sign up.)  If you’re a Fletcher applicant, the blog is your best source of relevant news.

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Among the student groups that are wrapping up their year’s work are the Fletcher publications.  Check out their websites, which contain the current or recent issues.

Al Nakhlah is the School’s online journal on Southwest Asia and Islamic Civilization.

The Fletcher Forum of World Affairs, founded in 1975, is the School’s student-run foreign policy journal.

Ideas Journal:  International Development, Environment, and Sustainability is the online journal of the Center for International Environment and Resource Policy.

Praxis:  The Fletcher Journal of Human Security is a three-decade old journal, which its editors describe as exploring “the intersections between the historically separate fields of humanitarianism, development, human rights, and conflict resolution.”

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I’ve written, over time, about many Fletcher student organizations, such as Perspectives and Futbol.  Students enrich their experience here with any number (sometimes a very large number!) of out-of-class activities, and the list of clubs and organizations looks slightly different each year, depending on student interests.  But one organization to which I’ve given insufficient recognition is The Fletcher Forum.  Quietly producing impressive publications for more than 30 years, Forum staffers don’t waste much time bringing attention to themselves.  But today I’ve asked the Forum editor, David Reidy, to tell us what it’s all about.

As one of the few academic journals entirely run by students, we have our hands full putting together The Fletcher Forum of World Affairs.  Each year we publish two issues filled with pieces on the important topics of today, written by academics and practitioners around the world.  It’s a demanding task, but an intensely rewarding experience.

Last year, our Editor-in-Chief, Naureen Kabir, raised the bar of success even higher, putting out three issues featuring luminaries such as Les Gelb, Hassan Abbas, Jendayi Frazier, Michael Jacobson, and Matthew Levitt.  This year we are returning to our normal bi-annual schedule, but filling Naureen’s shoes is no easy task.

The process starts with soliciting articles.  We contact authors for pieces based on the issues we think deserve attention, with a particular focus on collecting a diverse set of topics and opinions.  The Fletcher Forum of World Affairs strives to encompass all regions and subjects, even those that don’t normally receive attention in academic journals.  We also put out a general “Call For Papers,” which often leads to fascinating articles on topics we never even dreamed of covering.

Once we’ve collected plenty of pieces, we start the editing process.  As a Fletcher student, it’s a joy to peruse the submissions, and I never fail to learn something new.  Each article goes to an editing team and then back to the author, as part of a collaborative process to improve (or often just fine-tune) the piece before publication.  At least two editing teams will examine each submission, and once everyone is satisfied with the product, it’s off to the printer!

Editing can be a long process, and the intermediary steps can seem never-ending, but in the end it’s all worthwhile.  We take great satisfaction in producing a respected academic journal, and it’s always exciting to open the cover and see your own name on the masthead.  Working at The Fletcher Forum of World Affairs has been once of the most rewarding experiences of my time at Fletcher, and that is no small feat.

David Reidy
Editor-in-Chief

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Fletcher students tend to find the workload pretty challenging.  (New students are sometimes surprised by how much harder they work than they expected.)  So, after a long day on campus of reading, writing, and ruminating, many like to head home and crack open a nice cold…

…laptop, and do some extracurricular reading, writing, and ruminating.

Students are making an increasingly broad mark on online publications and forums.  Here are a  few examples, to which the writers themselves referred me:

First-year MALD student Elise Crane’s writing can be found in American Diplomacy, and the Huffington PostTwice!

Tim Ridout (second-year MALD) also writes for the Huffington Post, and for the Christian Science Monitor.

And Adam Welti (second-year MALD) wrote about nuclear energy at CampusProgress.org.

And there are plenty more.  Check out the list of columns and op-eds on the Fletcher News and Media page.

Naturally, not all students want to wait for publications to present their work.  Among the student bloggers are:

Rizwan Ladha (first-year MALD) on IR and nuclear weapons themes.
Carlos Munoz (second-year MALD) on the environment.
Chris Murray
(first-year MALD) on Sino-American relations.

Check the complete list (some updated, others a little less so) on the blog site.

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