Currently viewing the tag: "Student jobs"

I’m a big advocate of using the admissions waiting period (between submitting the application and hearing back from schools) to line up your financial plan.  (That’s assuming you haven’t done so already, which is an even better idea!)  Today, student blogger Aditi helps you out with information about working on campus, with special notes for international students like herself.

Deciding to come to graduate school is a daunting process, not least because it most often means giving up a regular income for two (or more!) years.  For international students in particular, dealing with unfavorable exchanges rates while adjusting to a new environment can be very overwhelming.

Although a few previous blog posts have talked about jobs on campus, they have all referred specifically to teaching or research assistant positions.  However, these positions are limited in supply, and most Fletcher students work in more traditional “office” jobs within the larger Tufts community — for example, one of my jobs is helping with prospect research at the Tufts Advancement (fundraising) office.

Before embarking on the hunt for a job, it’s important to bear in mind that international students face certain restrictions to working here, including not being allowed to work off-campus or more than 20 hours a week (though few students can spare the time for that, anyway!).  Upon arriving at Fletcher, all international students are briefed on the process they need to go through in order to start working on campus, including getting a social security card once you have a job.  Reiko Morris, the international student advisor, is a wonderful resource and always takes the time to answer any questions people have.

Having worked on campus in the U.S. as an undergrad, I came to Fletcher under the assumption that I would find a job soon after arriving, and budgeted for graduate school accordingly.  However, it wasn’t until well into my first semester that I found a job — which led to much panic, re-planning my finances, and feeling stressed instead of enjoying my first few months here.  I did eventually find two different jobs, and here are some tips I learned along the way:

Finding a job:

  • If you’re planning your budget for graduate school with a student job in mind, remind yourself to be patient about finding a job when you get here.  I made the mistake of assuming I would get a job quickly, and was stressed when it didn’t happen as fast as I thought it would.  In retrospect, I should have given myself at least a semester to settle in and look for a job.
  • Fletcher sends around emails to all students when jobs here become available, but remember that there are jobs in the wider Tufts community that are available to Fletcher students as well. There is an online resource (JobX) that you will become familiar with, which is usually the best place to look for student jobs.  Remember that in addition to serving as a teaching assistant (TA) for Fletcher classes, you can also look into TA-ing undergraduate courses at Tufts.
  • It might seem like a lot of jobs are only open to work-study students (and therefore not to international students), but don’t get discouraged!
  • In terms of deciding what kind of job to get, it’s important to be clear on what your goals are: do you want any job that pays, or do you want a job that ties neatly into your academic and career goals?  Obviously, it’s ideal if the job does both, but those jobs are rarer to find.  If you are very determined to find a job that is directly relevant to you, remember that that might mean spending more time looking, and passing up on other jobs in the meantime.

Managing your time:

  • The number of hours per week that Fletcher students work varies considerably.  Last semester, I was able to work a full 20 hours per week (which is more than most students do) but of course, this might change based on my courseload in coming semesters.  Working 20 hours a week was very challenging, and I had to learn how to manage my time well.  It also means that you face a very difficult trade-off in terms of attending all the amazing events, lectures, and parties at Fletcher!  One piece of advice I received was particularly helpful in navigating this trade-off, and that was when a friend told me that I have to decide whether financial stress or time-management stress is harder for me to deal with.  I decided that financial stress worried me more, and that I could find ways to manage my time efficiently.  However, if managing your time well is difficult for you, then it’s probably not a great idea to work more than 10 hours each week.

The process of finding a student job and then working while at Fletcher can be overwhelming, and in retrospect, I wish that I had approached the process more calmly.  If you would like to talk more about working on campus as an international student, leave your questions as a comment on this blog.  I’d be happy to answer!

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Fletcher students pursue many different approaches when considering campus employment.  Some jump right into the job hunt.  Others hold off for a semester, to allow themselves some time to get oriented.  But whether a student is determined to work only as a research assistant, or prefers to check out books in the library, the fact is that working during the semester is part of many students’ reality.

For the last couple of weeks, job postings have been floating through my email inbox and I thought I would share a few with you, posted by three different offices.  NOT, it should be noted, because these precise positions will be open in the semester when you enroll.  Rather, it’s just a sampler of some of the positions that are available.   These are real jobs that were offered up this semester, though I took out the name of the professor.

Institute Research Positions
The Institute for Business in the Global Context (IBGC) and the Center for Emerging Market Enterprises (CEME) are pleased to announce eight student research positions for the Sovereign Wealth Fund Initiative (SWFI) and the Cost of Cash research project.

The Sovereign Wealth Fund Initiative (SWFI) examines the key cross-border issues faced by Sovereign Wealth Funds and other long-term investors (LTIs) and issues a monthly newsletter containing white papers, fund profiles, and thought pieces from the Fletcher community and beyond.

Positions available:
•    Research Assistant, Sovereign Wealth Fund Bulletin (1 position)
•    Research Assistant, SWFI-Monitor Transactions Database (2 positions)
•    Research Assistant, SWFI Asset Allocation Project (1 position)

CEME houses a research agenda exploring the “Cost of Cash” for consumers, merchants, banks and government. The study explores the costs and benefits of cash payments to various stakeholders in the economy: consumers, merchants, and institutions that offer a safe and stable supply of paper money.  The first year of the project, completed in August 2012, focused on the U.S. market, particularly the under and unbanked sectors. In 2012-2013, the project will expand to Mexico and Egypt, and potentially other markets globally.

Positions Available:
•    Qualitative Researcher, Cost of Cash Mexico
•    Quantitative Researcher, Cost of Cash Mexico
•    Qualitative Researcher, Cost of Cash Egypt
•    Quantitative Researcher, Cost of Cash Egypt

Student Intern — Capital Campaign & Development Initiatives
Student Assistant position available in Fletcher’s Office of Development and Alumni Relations, specifically working with the Capital Campaign and Development Initiatives.  Approximately 8-10 hours per week.  Responsibilities will include: responding to general inquiries from alumni; writing and proofreading content for various electronic and print publications;  letter writing, research, database activity and capital project management assistance.

Applicants must pay high attention to detail; have strong writing skills, interest in fundraising and ease liaising with faculty, alumni and staff are all important. Must be able to commit to a structured weekly/monthly work schedule, with some flexibility.

Research Assistantships
A professor announces the availability of a number of research assistantships. Four positions are available in an international comparative research project that examines the impact of the fusion of nationalism and religion on the dynamics of conflict and on human suffering. Research assistants will help in examining a particular case, conducting literature surveys, writing summaries, helping to organize international seminars and workshops.  Research assistants will be invited to participate in a work/study group on the fusion of religion and nationalism in the spring.

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