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In the last few days I’ve contacted several applicants by email and haven’t heard anything in return.  I wish I could say that this has never happened before, but it’s sadly not unheard of.  In an age of Twitter, Snap Chat, and all kinds of other communications pathways, I know that email may not be your preferred medium.  On the other hand, it’s the way that Fletcher, and many (most?) other graduate schools will communicate with you.

All of that means that:

1) You should check your email every day and answer questions from your graduate schools immediately.

2) This is true even if you created your email address only for the purposes of applying to graduate school.  I appreciate that many people set up a new email address and folders for the application process, but you can’t simply enter the address in your application and then abandon the account.

3) There are people out there who might have been admitted, but who won’t be, because they haven’t sent along a certain key piece of information when we have requested it.

So, my friends, check your email daily.  Most days there will be nothing there from Fletcher or your other graduate schools, but some days you’ll find a message with a question.  And, eventually (next month — not right away), your email inbox is where you’ll find the news that your admissions decision is ready.

 

First, a note.  I’ve received emails from quite a few people in the last two weeks wondering when they’ll hear from us with the decision on their applications.  The answer is: not for a while!  We’re still mid-process — seeing the light at the end of the tunnel, for sure, but far from done.  Hang tight!

Liz and I are both at home reading today.  More accurately, Liz is reading, and I’m reading when I’m not writing a blog post.  Dan and I have already told you about our reading days.  Today the rest of the staff chimes in, survey style.  (Thank you to Kristen for providing the survey questions!)

Do you listen to music while reading?

Christine: Yes, something that is not distracting, though. Taylor Swift’s “1989” has been great background noise!  I’m also a fan of the iPod Genius mixes for anything moody and 90s (Matchbox 20, Goo Goo Dolls, etc.).

Kristen: On and off.  I find that some well-timed lively Latin American pop can help get me through a long afternoon.

Laurie: I find music very distracting when I am reading applications (or reading anything for that matter).  However, I do like the steady hum of my space heater.  The extra heat is a real plus as well.

Liz: I actually don’t.  I like silence, though sometimes a little background noise is nice.  More recently I’ve been reading during “snow days,” when Tufts has closed due to inclement weather, which normally is a rare occasion.  Given the weather, lately I’ve had the news on in the background while reading to keep up with the storm!  But usually, I don’t have any music, etc.

Favorite beverage to accompany your reading?

Kristen: Coffee, followed by some more coffee and perhaps a cup of coffee after that.

Laurie: I alternate between hot and cold beverages all day long.  Coffee in the morning (of course), cold water throughout the day, and then tea in the afternoon.

Liz: This depends a bit on the time of day! I’m a big fan of hydration, so I tend to have a large water bottle that I refill throughout the day.  In the morning I also will have a nice hot cup of coffee, and in the afternoon, I sometimes will make a fruit smoothie.  It breaks up the day and is a nice treat to look forward to!

Christine: Water, always water.  Sometimes a nice hot tea when the mood strikes.

Pet peeve while reading applications?

Laurie: My biggest pet peeve is when I misspell or mistype words when I am writing my notes.  Our new system does not have an auto correct and I always need to go back and edit my work.

Liz: My biggest pet peeve when reading is when an applicant doesn’t follow directions or pay attention to details within the essays.  We’ve seen it all as readers — including applicants whose essays are written for other schools.  A word to the wise: stick to the word limit, answer the questions we have asked and read through your essays to ensure you’ve uploaded the essay for the right school!  Attention to detail is important, and is something we keep our eye on.

Christine: Applicants not filling out their academic information completely.

Kristen: A cold room and a shoddy application.

What incentive do you give yourself to help make it through a pile of applications?

Liz: For me, my incentive is always food!  I won’t let myself eat breakfast until I’ve read at least a few files on a long read day.  The same thing is true for eating lunch or a snack.  I always make a “hot” lunch on read days as well, since I don’t normally do that during the week.  I usually will give myself a goal and when I meet that goal, my reward is a tasty treat.

Christine: If I get through five applications, I can take a stretch break.  If I get through 10, I can have a snack break!

Kristen: Coffee. Is the coffee thing coming through?

Laurie: Reading days are all about incentives!  Throughout the day I set reading goals to meet before getting a drink, eating lunch, moving to a new reading location, taking a shower, etc.

Your reading “mascot”?

Christine: Not really a mascot, but reading means I can cuddle up in my favorite blanket on the couch, and have the fire on when it is chilly.  It is especially idyllic when the snow is falling, which has happened a lot this reading season!

Kristen:  I’ve got two little kiddos, so seeing them (or even a picture of them) livens up the day.

Laurie: I do not have any mascots, but I do need my reading space organized to maximize comfort and efficiency before I can start.  I need pillows, a blanket, a place for my water, a stool for my feet and a surface for my mouse.  I rarely read at a desk or on a table because it is uncomfortable and slows me down.

Liz: I unfortunately don’t have a reading mascot; I do however have a favorite chair I sit in with my lap top.  The key to a great reading day is yummy food, a good lap desk, a warm blanket and cozy socks.  Reading days are one of my favorite things about my job!  We get to learn all about amazing applicants and help build, what we hope will be, a truly remarkable Fletcher class!

Since none of us have mascots that can top Murray for cuteness, here he is again:

Murray sunbathing

 

Ordinarily, Admissions staffers each dedicate one day a week to reading applications, and then fit in additional reading whenever they can.  Our schedule this winter has been hijacked by Mother Nature, and we’ve all found ourselves at home on snow days, grateful for the ease of grabbing files from our new online reader system.  Yesterday was one of those days, and Dan kindly sent me a report late in the afternoon.  As the only staffer with a resident dog or cat, Dan has the most photogenic reading companion.

It’s application reading season once again!  Regular blog readers know that we all have our routines to help us give quality reads to as many files as possible in a day.  The biggest change in those routines this year is physical.  In the past, a read day has involved an unwieldy stack of paper files, stretching ominously toward the heavens like Isengard (for those of you whose nerd alerts just went off, I swear I had to look up the proper spelling of “Isengard”).  Now the entire mountain of files is reflected conveniently on my computer screen.

Having our application system entirely online is, in most ways, totally sweet.  No carting around boxes of files!  No paper cuts (believe me, you do NOT want a manila folder paper cut)!  But with great power comes great responsibility, which in this case is that nagging realization that you always COULD read one more file.  The e-pile is always there taunting us.

breakfastMurray!Otherwise, though, a read day follows the familiar dynamics.  Breakfast: check.  And yes, I am lame enough that I end up eating the exact same thing I bring in to the office every morning.  Music: check.  For some reason I find Sigur Ros to be among the ideal soundtracks for reading.  Maybe I’m just hoping for a few apps from Iceland.  Murray: check.  Sure, he looks harmless now, but just wait until he starts making demands.  It’s important to read as much as I can early, before this monster takes over completely.

As always, I’m amazed by the quality of our applicant pool.  Balancing out the total feeling of inadequacy that reading Fletcher applications gives me is the knowledge that I’ll be getting to know many of these folks personally in the next year.  A full day of reading is intense, and ultimately tiring, but also very enlightening and inspiring.  It certainly beats a sharp stick in the eye.

Murray weather readyMurray usually gives me 15-20 files before putting forth his agenda items. Item #1: go outside:

With all the snow we’ve had recently, he needs to seriously suit up to go on a real walk.  The only other option is to quickly pop out into the trough we’ve dug in the snow in our backyard for him.  Poor guy looks like Moses crossing the Red Sea out there, so a full-on walk it is.  It’s a good head-clearing break for me, too.

I always imagine I’ll dive right back into reading once we get back into the house. Murray has other ideas, though:

Murray ready to play
You’ve submitted some fantastic reading material, Applicants, and I promise I’ll get back to it soon.  But first, I have an urgent plush-donut-toy-related matter to attend to.

 

What a Groundhog Day we’re having!

Let me start with our bad news: Mother Nature has trumped Admissions Office planning.  Winter Storm “Linus” is due to leave us with a new foot of snow, and Tufts University is closed for the day.  Before we received the snow-day notice, we were planning to greet a group of visiting students who were admitted in the Early Notification Admissions round.  Several changed their travel plans as the storm worked its way over Chicago and the midwest, but a few are in town.  We’re working to connect them with students so that they can still leave town with an expanded knowledge of Fletcher.  (BIG thank you to the students who have set aside their cups of snow-day cocoa to meet the visitors!)

Sigh.  The best laid plans, and all of that…

On the good news side, the New England Patriots brought some pre-snow joy to their fans by winning the Super Bowl.  Not being much of a football fan myself, I still watched enough of the game to be able to hold up my end of the conversations around the water cooler.  I hope I’ll still be able to have those conversations tomorrow when we’re back in the office.

And I might as well make some kind of observation about the weather.  Though I’m a transplanted New Yorker, I’ve lived in the Boston area for a long time.  Our yearly experience with snow ranges from none to quite a bit.  The average annual snowfall is about 43 inches/year, usually spread between November and March.  We can count on a storm or two during a year, but the past week has been very unusual.  There are much snowier parts of the U.S.  It just doesn’t feel that way today.

 

Are you on the East Coast of the U.S.?  Then your view today might be similar to mine.

Snow

Today is a snow day at Tufts and, in fact, throughout Massachusetts, as a blizzard Nor’easter blows through.  I can’t even say how much snow has fallen as it’s swirling all over.  In any case, enough snow has fallen to ensure I will need to dig my way out of the door.  But that’s an activity for later today.

Because the University is closed, please be patient if we can’t respond to your questions until tomorrow.

Meanwhile, I wanted to take a minute to point out a few Admissions Blog features that I’ll be working on throughout the rest of the academic year.  First, there are the First-Year Alumni updates.  These posts, including one yesterday from Hanneke, come from the folks who were still students just a year ago.

Alumni who are further into their post-Fletcher professional lives have been providing Five-Year Updates.  This is the third year for these posts.  I started with the Class of 2007, continued through the Class of 2008, and I’m now working with our friends in the Class of 2009.  The next post in this series is coming soon!

In a few weeks, I’ll ask students to write about all the Cool Stuff they have done throughout the year.  Look for new posts in this series in April, but you can still read about last year’s activities, as well an interesting mid-MALD year.

Finally, professors have kindly taken time to write about their interests, their work with students, and their pathways into the international affairs field, and these posts are captured in the Faculty Spotlight series.

Because I’m well aware that writing for the blog falls outside of the daily routine for alumni, students, and professors, I want their posts to have a life that lasts more than a day, and I hope that you’ll scroll through the different series and read what everyone has to say.

 

I’m starting to see a steady trickle of emails from nervous applicants, so I thought I’d provide a quick update on where we are in the process.

Let’s start with those who applied by December 20 — PhD and Map Your Future applicants.

Map Your Future application review, a manageable task, has moved along and most decisions have been released.  (Congratulations to those who have received good news!)

The PhD review process is also ticking right along, but at its own special glacial pace.  PhD applications are reviewed by a whole team of people and everything just takes a long time.  Decisions will be released by the end of March.

And for those who applied by January 10 for the MALD, MIB, LLM, or MA, we’re making real progress.  Many many of you already know that your application is complete and on its way to be read by Admissions Committee members.  Our student readers have been doing a great job, feeding applications to us staff members, and we’re all reading away.  The full Admissions Committee will meet tomorrow for the first time since the January deadline.  In other words, it’s all happening.

If you know that your application is still incomplete, I’d encourage you to do whatever you can to make it complete as soon as possible.  If you’re missing exam scores (GRE, GMAT, etc.), you can’t make the testing organizations work faster, but you can send us unofficial score reports. And if you’re missing a transcript, remember that all we need is a scanned copy of an official transcript (which you may well have already).  If you don’t have an official transcript, send us an unofficial one while you wait for the official one.

If you’re missing a recommendation, you should consider your options.  If you’re confident the recommender will send it along any day, then stick with Plan A.  If you’re not really all that sure, you may want to line up a replacement recommender.  Give it some thought, and contact us if you want to make a change.  Of course, if you’ve never followed up with your recommender, you can hardly blame him/her.  It’s your job to prompt your writer to submit the letter on time.

Finally, no matter when your application was complete, you’ll still need to be patient until late March, when we will release just about everything at the same time.  Today’s post is just to let you know that everything is moving along, and we’re feeling good about the progress we have made.

 

On Sunday I made a last-minute decision to jump-start my application reading on Monday.  We’ve often written about our “reading days” at home.  Past posts have always involved piles of green files (and, occasionally, cute dogs).  These days, no paper files!  Here’s how my day went.

7:30:  Move a laptop to a kitchen counter, grab a cup of mint tea in favorite frog mug, and kick off the day, starting with a quick review of email but soon moving on to the applications that were waiting for me in my queue.

IMG_0703[1]

9:30:  The pain in my shoulder from being perched over a keyboard tells me it’s time for a break.  Switch to coffee (half caf/half decaf — I want to be alert but you wouldn’t want me too jumpy) in a theme-appropriate mug.  Do shoulder rolls while switching to another location — a desktop with a more comfortable chair.

IMG_0704[1]

12:00:  I’ve now cleared out my queue, which means I can start plucking applications at random.  But first, lunch — a peanut butter and jelly sandwich.  So far as I’m concerned, peanut butter is always #1, and being at home means I can toast the bread for the sandwich.

1:00:  After lunch, I read another couple of files, but at 1:00 it’s time to park myself somewhere warm and comfortable for a conference call.  After the call, I switch back to the laptop, but on a different counter — changing chairs throughout the day is part of my reading strategy.  More tea in yet another world-map mug.

IMG_0707[1]

3:30:  Emails distract me for a while.  Once I regain focus, I return to my application queue and try to finish whatever I’ve loaded in there.

4:45:  That’s it for the day.  Time to put together a quick dinner and then head out to a meeting of a community board I’m on.  A little human interaction (and a chance to be outside) won’t be a bad thing.

There are so many great things about our new online application reader system, but I’m still working on strategies for pain-free reading.  More changes of chair?  More cups of tea?  By the end of this year’s application cycle, I’ll have it all worked out.  Meanwhile, I’ve already read some inspiring essays and I know there’s more to come!

 

Well, here we are, on the other side of the general application deadline.  Processing of the applications we received over the weekend has already begun, and will keep us busy for the next two weeks or so.  In some cases, almost no work is needed — everything was submitted online and we simply need to confirm it’s all there.  In other cases, we need to scan a transcript or recommendation and make sure the scan is added to an applicant’s credentials.  And then there are applications that are missing a couple of pieces, and we need to notify the applicant.  Whether your application needs effort or not, everyone is in one big line and your patience will be appreciated.

To that end, let me share Christine’s FAQs to guide you on tracking your application.  Note, especially, the instructions on how to access your Application Status page.

Frequently Asked Questions: Application Edition

I Submitted My Application!  Now What?

Your Application Status page will display information about your status.

To access your Application Status Page you can either click the “Start an Application” link on the Admissions website or save the application link.  You will login with the email and password you used when you created your application.

How Do I Know If My Application is Incomplete or Complete?

Even after you have submitted all the required materials, your application is not complete until a staff member has reviewed each document to check that it is correct and legible.  Your Application Status page displays the most up-to-date information on your application.  Please allow us up to 10 days after we receive your materials to update your status.

Your application will be marked as incomplete if we find that items are missing, your transcripts are difficult to read or not translated into English, or your application fee has not been received (with the exception of fee waivers).  If we are missing materials or cannot read application documents, we will contact you.

Fletcher Admissions will send you a confirmation email when all of your application materials have been compiled and your application is ready to be reviewed by the Admissions Committee.  Once your application is complete, no further action is required.

Please Note: the order in which your application is processed has no bearing on your admissions decision.

When Will I Receive My Decision?

Admissions decisions will be released before April 1.  We will send a message to the email address you used on your application with information regarding your decision.

If you have further questions, please email us or call us at 1-617-627-3040.

Use the same email address from your application on all email messages.  Due to the high volume of communications we receive, it can take several days for us to reply to you.  We appreciate your patience!

 

Well, only about 36 hours remain before the application deadline.  A nice little batch of applications came in early, meaning (perhaps) that someone responded to my plea to submit early.  On the other hand (sigh), hundreds remain unsubmitted, so on balance, I’ve been ignored.  That’s o.k., I can take it.

Student readers on the Admissions Committee have been keeping our process ticking along, taking time during their winter break to read applications — a huge benefit of our new online application reader.  (Going paperless also earned the Admissions Office “Silver Level” recognition from the University Office of Sustainability’s Green Office Certification Program.  Hooray for us!)

When we return to work on Monday, the team — including our returning student interns — will focus on processing applications and will kick off the heart of the application review period.  There will be a bit of a frenzy for a couple of weeks, but this is the time of year that many of us like best.  We look forward to “meeting” you through your applications, and to working with you throughout the spring.

 

Thanks to a little advance planning, I was able to keep the blog running from December 22 to January 2, while I was sitting in my mother-in-law’s North London living room.  We spent two weeks away, mostly visiting with my husband Paul’s family.  We also made a side trip to Copenhagen, where I had never visited before.  That was fun!  Also fun — seeing my daughter, Kayla, who is spending the year studying in London.  She even proved that she’s been learning something, as she was the only one with the correct answers to the British politics questions on the traditional family holiday quiz.  Go Kayla!

(As a side note, I’ll mention that Kayla saw someone in a Fletcher Fútbol sweatshirt running down a street near her London flat.  She didn’t think quickly enough that day, but next time she’ll chase the runner to ask who it is.  Fletcher is everywhere!)

Until today, my week has mostly been tied up with catching up after time away, and preparing for the months to come.  To that end, the Admissions staff will be gathering this morning for a half-day retreat to talk about all those things that will keep us busy between now and May, when the work flow will finally slow.  It’s always a useful exercise to take a few hours to talk about the big picture.  We tend to get wrapped up in the fine details of our work while reviewing applications and doing the rest of what needs to be done from January to March.

We’ll be back in the office this afternoon, ready to take whatever questions may come in, now that we’re down to the wire before the application deadline.

 

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