Currently viewing the category: "Our Students"

Last Thursday, we hosted our Admissions interns for an end-of-year lunch.  For two, it’s only farewell until September.  For three of the interns, it was a more final goodbye.  We’ll see them at Commencement, of course, but after that they are all off to do good things in the world.

This week, the pace of farewells accelerates.  When not busy having a great time with classmates, students will stop in to say goodbye.  One first-year dropped off plants that I will be plant-sitting for the summer.  Others just want to touch base before they leave.  Honestly, while I’m always proud to have played the tiniest of roles in launching students in their new careers, the dominant emotion is wistfulness.  And not only because it’s a little lonely for us staffers in the summer.

One of the most enjoyable aspects of recruiting writers for the Five-Year Updates and First-Year Alumni posts has been reconnecting with old pals.  It was so nice to correspond with Jelana and Ivette, for example — friends from when they spent lots of time in the Admissions Office.  And I recently received an invitation to an alum’s wedding in Tunisia.  That is, once students leave the campus, we can still create opportunities to remain in touch.  I can feel happy about their graduation, knowing that it isn’t the end of our contact with each other.

 

Earlier this semester, via the Social List, a PhD student who previously completed the MALD degree revived a several-year tradition wherein students reframe the title of their thesis in the form of a haiku.  Unfamiliar with this poetry form?  In its most basic, the haiku requires three lines of seven, five, and seven syllables.  Perhaps these thesis haikus (or thes-kus) don’t quite reach the pinnacle of haiku achievement, but they certainly frame the thesis topics well.  I tried not to pick among them and just harvested as many as I could off the Social List messages.

The Thesis Haikus

Thesis/haiku title: “Trends in youth political engagement during Tunisia’s democratic transition, 2010-2014″

We did it our way
And then we tried it their way
Neither really work.

Thesis/haiku title: “Culture and Women’s Rights: CEDAW Article 5(a) Implementation in West Africa”

Women get the shaft
Laws are trying to fix this
Culture makes it hard

“The New Frontier of development: how securitization and risk spreading in the microfinance industry can benefit development and the private sector”

Nervous investors
Development won’t hurt you
Try it, it’s awesome

“The 2014 Tunisian electoral system: implications of a semi-presidential system on the nascent democracy”

Tunisia has a new regime!
Lots of new rules
Awesome! Or is it?

“The Drivers of Russia’s Course: Russian Foreign Policy and Putin’s Fear of Revolution”

Putin is afraid
of color revolutions
and blames the U.S.

“The Evolution of Head of State Immunity for International Crimes”

Gotta extradite!
personal immunity?
Oh, never mind then.

“Beyond Isolation: Moving Past the Refugee Camp and Connecting to Home”

War and disaster
A mobile phone for the road
Connecting with home

“Food Security, Monoculture, and the Black Box: Impact and Causal Mechanisms of the Land Husbandry, Water Harvesting, and Hillside Irrigation Program in Rwanda”

Dudes ate better food
Why do we see these results?
Probably compost

“The effect of sector-specific tax incentives on Brazilian FDI inflows”

People hate taxes.
Wait, isn’t that obvious?
Yup. That’s my capstone…

“Russia’s invasion of Crimea: effects on energy geopolitics in the Caucasus and the Central Asia”

Putin hits, EU watches
Right in the middle Ukraine falls
In the end, energy talks

“Commercializing Cassava: A Case Study of SABMiller’s South Sudan Supply Chain”

Beer is real tasty
And farmers might make mo’ cash
Oh wait, there’s a war

“Migration by Choice, Not Necessity? Shifts in the Migration and Development Discourse since 2007”

If not migrant rights,
What are you really talking about?
Cue awkward silence.

“Advocating for Security Sector Reform in the Review of Peace Operations: Strategy and Analysis for United Nations Security Sector Reform Practitioners”

Not merely bullets
Governance and ownership
Listen, Ban Ki-moon

“How to Evaluate Non-State Actors for Political and Military Partnerships in Irregular Conflicts: A Case Study of the Free Syrian Army”

Wars get ugly quick.
Something called HUMINT.
Next time, read a history book.

“The new European Commission: institutional and political capacities to relaunch the European economy.”

New leaders – new will?
Or promises don’t bind?
Merkel will decide.

“A comparative analysis of transnational criminal groups in Latin America: Mexican drug cartels and Salvadoran gangs — an overview of trends and responses”

Both are really bad
Monkey see, monkey do… eek!
Governments are slow

“Progress, Opportunity, Prosperity? A Case Study of the Digitization of a Conditional Cash Transfer Program in Mexico”

Cash money real nice
Digital road less traveled
Change is really hard

“Philippine Department Of Tourism: A Case Study Destination Branding Through “It’s More Fun In The Philippines”

Manila Thrill-ah
Islands, Beaches, FDI
And lots of traffic…

“Drivers of conflict around hydropower development in the Brazilian Amazon: from Tucurui to Tapajos”

It’s all about trust
If you screw me I screw you
As simple as that

“Navigating Nairobi: A Case Study of Digital Innovation in the Transport and Logistics Sector in Kenya”

Bus, car, bike, walk…stay?
Phone and internet, oh yay!
Twende o twende

(Twende = “let’s go” in Swahili)

Tagged with:
 

GISFor some years now, many Fletcher students have been incorporating GIS (Geographic Information System) projects into their curricula.  They can access support and needed hardware/software through the GIS Center that is run by the Technology Services folks.  Tomorrow, over 30 of our students will be among the 130 Tufts students and faculty who present at a campus-wide GIS Poster Exposition.

For an idea of what this year’s posters will look like, check out the 2014 poster gallery.  Two of the runners up for the Best in Show prize, Evan Paradis and Andrea Bosneag were Fletcher students.

 

 

 

 

 

 

While I regret that I don’t have a way to capture all of the achievements of and honors received by our students and alumni, a few nice ones have recently passed by me.  First, Anna McCallie, second-year MALD (which, at this time of year, means soon to graduate and leave us), received the University’s Presidential Award for Citizenship.  In the type of supportive message I love to see, her friend and classmate Ali shared news of Anna’s award with the community, writing:

This award recognizes outstanding community service and leadership achievements.  This should come as no surprise to those of us who have benefited from her dedication in putting together this year’s Tufts Energy Conference, her virtuosity in making the Culture Nights what we’ve all enjoyed, and her beaming presence around campus.

Nice!  Over the weekend, I received a note from alumna Margot Shorey, informing me (and others included on the message) that she has recently published an article.

I would like to share this article Chad: a Precarious Counterterrorism Partner that I co-wrote with my colleague Dr. Benjamin Nickels, which has been published in the April edition of the CTC Sentinel.  I thought you might find the subject and our analysis interesting.

Although the title says most of it, here’s a teaser: Chad has been building a reputation as a strong and reliable counterterrorism partner in an increasingly difficult region of Africa.  International partners are funding Chad’s military to fight high profile non-state actors such as Boko Haram and AQIM, but there are multiple internal and external vulnerabilities that could render this regional power broker a broken power.  On the edge of your seat to find out what these vulnerabilities are…..? Read more here.

If you have comments, you can reach Margot via Twitter at @margots02.

And then, I learned that one of our first-year MALD students, Katherine Trujillo, is one of the 2015-16 recipients of the Paul & Daisy Soros Fellowships for New Americans.  Others at Fletcher had already heard the news, but I’m not sorry that I first found out about it when I saw her smiling in the announcement in The New York Times.

 

As a Fletcher staffer, there are the events I attend, the events I wish I could attend but don’t have time for, and the events that, let’s be honest, are really designed for students, not staff.  That would include the Culture Nights, where students share music, dance, and other performances from their native Asia, Africa, Latin America, and the Mediterranean Region, and just have a great time.  The newest of the Culture Nights is Americana Night, which I have asked Admissions pal and soon-to-graduate MALD student, Anna, to describe.

Fact: There are 50 states in America!
Fact: The colors of the American Flag are red, white, and blue!
Fact: Beyoncé is our greatest national treasure!

These are just three of the “facts” that students who attended this month’s Americana Night learned.  I had the honor of being the co-host in both my years at Fletcher, and it is quite a night.  There might not be a lot of learning going on, but there is a whole lot of fun.

Americana Night started as a Fletcher Follies sketch a few years ago — it was a tongue-in-cheek parody of all of the other (amazing) Culture Nights at Fletcher.  But then some students decided they wanted to make it a real thing, so here we are!

This year, we had a truly incredible display of talent.  Many different genres of American music were represented, from a bluegrass quartet singing Johnny Cash to “Fletallica,” a metal band covering some of the greatest headbangers in the canon.  The fashion show theme was “America Through The Decades,” and Fletcherites strutted their stuff to hits ranging from Chubby Checker to Mariah Carey.  One student performed some of Robin Williams’s greatest stand-up routines as a tribute to the comedian, while another recited original poetry that he had penned for the occasion.  And, of course, there was Beyoncé.  Well, a Beyoncé dance, that is — we reached out to the legend herself, but she couldn’t squeeze Americana Night into her busy schedule.  Next year, Bey!

Despite the night’s star-spangled theme, students from all over the world performed in the acts.  Jamaica, Mexico, Venezuela, South Korea, Ghana… as with everything at Fletcher, this was a truly international gathering.  We even had a nice tribute to the frozen north as our brothers and sisters from Canada sang their national anthem at the top of the show.

Hosting and organizing Americana Night was definitely the highlight of my Fletcher career.  The Culture Nights as a whole represent the very best of Fletcher.  We’re a group of internationally minded people who love nothing more than to get together with some good food, good spirits, and good friends, to better know the world.

 

I’m sure that you’ve noticed that I refer to the Social List a lot.  It’s both a thread to weave together the student community, and also a glimpse into student life for those of us who stand outside the window looking in.  For the second year, I thought I’d capture and annotate all the messages that circulated on a day.  (This is easy for me to do, as I receive the messages in digest form.)  On March 30, the digest arrived in four email portions, with many messages dedicated to a smaller group of topics.  Please find below the topics of discussion, with the briefest of explanations of the message content.

Social List Digest Table of Contents:

Join us, volunteer and help the community! – Fletcher Cares: Fletcher Cares is a student group that supports both the Fletcher community and groups in the local area.

Dean Stavridis, Ben Affleck, and Bill Gates: Dean Stavridis testified before Congress alongside Ben Affleck and Bill Gates.  A surprising group!

Future Opportunities & Challenges for Evaluation in the UN – April 1, 12:30-1:30pm: Notices of events can be posted on two different lists, one of which is the Social List.

Editing Skills Workshop, Wednesday: Once a year, the Director of the Writing Center holds an editing skills workshop for those who work on the various Fletcher journals and any other community member who might want to sharpen their editing skills.

Continuing the “Food for thought…” Conversation – Wednesday: Previous to this post, a student had raised a question linked to attitudes about race.  Other students created a forum for discussion of the issue.

EVENT THIS WEDNESDAY: Navigating Social Identities in the Workplace:  Another event.

Grant Writing Workshop: Monday: And more writing help, offered by the Humanitarian Action Society

Dandiya Raas/Garba this Friday at Tufts!:  Indian snacks, Bollywood music, and dancing.

New Date for Slow Food Brew Off: I’m not even sure what this was, but food and brew were involved.

Shared taxi from Logan around 1AM?: Transportation shares — a popular Social List topic.

Giveaway: Korean spicy noodles: Too many packets of spicy noodles?  The Social List can help.

Technology and Inclusive Innovation: The IBM Story in Africa: Yet another event.

MONDAY: #RealTalk: All the things about post-Fletcher life you are afraid to ask: Students helping each other as they apprehensively approach the future.

Bringing back an old Fletcher tradition: the thesis-ku: More about this topic soon.  This was the top topic on the day’s Social List digest.

Selling: Printer & Corkboard: Random combination, but just about anything can find a home.

Applications DUE TONIGHT to lead the Fletcher International Migration Group (IMG)!: One generation of Student Group leaders finding the next generation.

A few more female hosts needed for Open House!: Yes, the Admissions Office uses the Social List to connect with students, including when overnight hosts are needed for visitors.

SEEKING: Drums for Cricket World Cup semi finals: This message led to conversations about the drums, cricket, and the World Cup results.

SEEKING: Sewing Kit: Not all needs are as unusual as World Cup drums.

First Years: Don’t Fret: One of my favorite annual themes, in which second-year students reassure first-years that everything (exams, internship search, etc., etc.) will work out.

BFA – Research Associate Apr 1st deadline: Students often hear about, and share, job notices from friends, former employers, or other networks.

SEEKING: Secret dog training talent: After this, it will be secret no longer.

Have you worked in luxury retail?: The message does not reveal the mystery behind this question.

SUMMER SUBLET: Housing is a hot topic throughout the spring.

In total, 82 messages were sent to the Social List between 4:00 on March 29 and 3:59 on March 30, when the digest was compiled.  I haven’t listed all the topics that occurred more than once, but you get the idea.  The Social List is where events are posted, random questions appear, and things/jobs/housing/support are offered/requested, creating conversation and connections between and among students.

Tagged with:
 

Though you wouldn’t guess it from the number of times we scheduled and rescheduled, one of my favorite things to do around here is to grab my trusty co-pilot, Kristen, and head out to the Hall of Flags to chat with students for the blog.  For those who haven’t visited, the Hall of Flags is the main gathering spot at Fletcher, and the best place to catch up with folks.  And that’s what we did last Tuesday.  Because we’re so close to the end of the semester, we asked everyone about a highlight of their year.

As soon as we walked into the HoF, we saw Terry and Stephanie, both of whom were included in the post about last year’s HoF visit.  This time, Stephanie was selling tickets to “Americana Night” and Terry was keeping her company.

Terry (MALD ’15): The highlight of my year is Fletcher Follies, which hasn’t actually happened yet.  Last year’s Follies was my favorite event of my whole Fletcher experience so far.  It’s fun making videos and also seeing how creative people are in terms of their execution of the videos.  And it’s a highlight from a social perspective.  It brings together students, staff, and faculty in a collegial way leading up to finals.  Everyone is very stressed out by that time in the semester, but it’s a fun way for all the students to come together in one room.

Stephanie (MALD ’15): I’m looking forward to Follies as well, but I’m more excited about the Follies videos I’m making.  I’m doing four — a Harry Potter themed one, and a “30 Rock” parody called “160 Pack,” and we also did a “Shining” themed one.

Stephanie probably listed all four, but I appear to have missed one.

Terry and Stephanie

Marie (MALD ’15): The highlight of my year is my class with Prof. Khan, Historian’s Art.  It’s a phenomenal class.  It goes through great moments in history like World War I and the Cuban Missile Crisis.  It assumes we know about the events and Prof. Khan focuses on the time leading up to them and who the key players are.

Marie

Ravi (MIB graduate and IBGC Research Fellow): My highlight was a perfect week when, on Monday, Bloomberg wrote about Mark Zuckerberg’s speech in Barcelona and, in the same paragraph, referenced our Digital Evolution Index, saying that the global investment community agrees with our research findings.  Then, the week ended on Friday with Bill Gates tweeting out the article that Bhaskar (Chakravorti), Rusty (Tunnard), and I wrote in the Harvard Business Review to his 20 million followers, and it got retweeted nearly 5000 times.  It was the most perfect week with the best bookends that one could hope for.

Ravi

Stephen (MA ’15) (camera shy): Last week we did a class trip down to the Naval War College.  We got to see a lot of speakers and visit downtown Newport.  We had a talk on North Korea, Taiwan defense, and Chinese anti-access.

Next we chatted with Morgan, who like Stephanie, was selling tickets — in this case to the Diplomat’s Ball.  Check, cash, or Venmo.

Morgan (MALD ’15):

We had a sending off party for one of our friends who recently got a wonderful job opportunity in Washington, DC.  The energy in the room was incredibly supportive, nurturing and all those good things.  It was a wonderful experience, full of love and light and appreciation for each other.

Morgan
Mary (MALD graduate and current Assistant Director of Student Affairs, who as part of her job responsibilities, attends the social events on campus):
  Africana Night was a highlight.  It has struggled over the years, including once when it was snowed out.  This year’s was the best Africana Night I had ever seen.  It was very high energy and the acts were high quality.

Mary D
Sid (MIB ’15):  For spring break, I went with Fletcher friends, seven of us, to the Bahamas.  We went diving and the instructor asked us where we were from, and we were all from different countries, including Korea, Thailand, India, Japan, U.S., and Nepal.  He was really surprised and asked how we came together.

Sid
When we finished talking to Sid, all system broke down.  We spotted Meg, a PhD student, and went to chat with her.  Then Ben, another PhD student, came along and we pulled him over.  And then we interrupted both of them when Prof. Burgess came along.

Prof. Burgess (Director of the LLM Program): One of my high points was being able to have coffee, along with all the other LLM students, with Judge Joyce Aluoch, (F08) the Vice President of the International Criminal Court.  She joined our group to provide both an overview of the activities of the ICC and to chat informally about current issues facing the court and questions of international law generally.  It’s a special aspect of Fletcher that opportunities like this exist, so that students like our LLM students have an opportunity to meet and interact with very experienced and senior international lawyers.

Prof. Burgess
Then we turned our attention back to Meg and Ben, and the following dialogue resulted:

Them: We’re mentor and mentee.
Us: Which way does it go?  Who’s mentor and who’s mentee?
Them: Exactly.

Meg: Our PhD cohort is the best ever.  Last September, eight of us started.  We have a diverse group.  We just jelled very quickly during Orientation and then we accepted the four internals (who had completed the MALD) into our coven.  We all get along really well, and we fight like brothers and sisters.  We adopted Ben into our cohort.

Ben:  I’m jealous.  Having the large number of external admits last year has broadened the community in an exciting way.

Meg and Ben
Finding two PhD students together in the Hall of Flags is a rare event.  As an additional coincidence, we then bumped into the student whose new job Morgan had been celebrating.

Brionne (MALD ’15): I’m leaving for Washington, DC tomorrow, but today I’m presenting at the Diversity and Inclusiveness Committee about equity inclusion for Fletcher students.  I completed classes in January, and starting next week I’ll be working at USAID as a presidential appointee.  I’ll be serving as a Congressional Liaison Officer, supporting Agency priorities on Africa and democracy, conflict and humanitarian assistance, meaning I’ll be pushing for incentives that President Obama spearheaded, such as the Mandela Washington Fellowship.

Throughout this semester, while waiting for a security clearance, I’ve been embraced by the community and supported as I navigate my transition into the professional world.  The administration has been especially supportive as I completed my capstone.  I’ve continued to build on my relationships with students and also continued to work on ongoing student efforts to promote diversity and inclusion in line with the Fletcher Strategic Plan.

Brionne
By then, an hour had passed and it was time for Kristen and me to return to our day-to-day work.  We only managed one blog trip to the Hall of Flags in 2014-15, but we’ll be back, hopefully more than once, next year.

Tagged with:
 

Today is April 20: Enrollment decisions (as well as decisions on whether to take a spot on the waitlist) are due by 11:59 p.m. EDT (UTC-4).

Today is also Patriots’ Day, a public holiday in Massachusetts, and the Admissions Office (as well as the rest of Tufts University) is closed.

Patriots’ Day means the Boston Marathon!  Thirteen Fletcher students are participating as members of the Tufts Marathon Team.  Cheer for Stephanie Brown, Tim Grant, Natalie Lam, Kelly Liu, Conner Maher, Tim Magner, Chris Maroshegyi, Alex Nisetich, Gustavo Perez Ara, Tim Roberts, Alex Taylor, Peter Varnum, and Mollie Zapata!  To join TMT, runners pledge to raise funds for nutrition and fitness programs.  If you’re also inclined to support programs of that type, it is still possible to support one or more of the runners!

The runners have been training hard, even during our epic winter.

Snow run
Fortunately, running became more comfortable as the weather improved.

Running, 2

Running

Marathon 20 miler (2)
Taking on marathon training on top of everything that Fletcher students do is a mammoth undertaking.  Good luck, Fletcher runners!

Tagged with:
 

With Commencement only about five weeks away, we’ll be reading only a few more posts from graduating bloggers Diane and Liam.  Today, Liam provides his “Annotated Curriculum,” in which he lays out his academic path through Fletcher.  (You might also want to read Mirza’s Annotated Curriculum from last spring.)  It’s worth noting here that Liam’s Fletcher experience is not typical for the majority of students, but it does represent that of a significant subset — officers who are sponsored by their branch of the U.S. military.  Their coursework looks much the same as that of any other student, but they rarely pursue a summer internship and they don’t need to find a post-Fletcher job.  Finally, Fletcher students must fulfill a Capstone Requirement, for which many students write a traditional academic thesis.  It’s not uncommon for the terms Capstone and thesis to be used interchangeably.

Liam, MALD 2015, United States

Pre-Fletcher Experience
U.S. Army Infantry Officer; deployments to Iraq (2007-2008) and Afghanistan (2010, 2012)

Fields of Study
International Security Studies
International Negotiation and Conflict Resolution (INCR)

Capstone Topic
U.S. Army Security Force Assistance in Iraq and Afghanistan

Post-Fletcher Professional Goals
Return to the Army with a broader understanding of global affairs and the role the Army can play in them; selection as an Infantry Battalion Commander

Curriculum Overview

Semester One

  • Role of Force
  • International Organizations
  • Processes of International Negotiation
  • The Globalization of Politics and Culture for Iran, Afghanistan and Pakistan

My first semester helped me lay the foundation for my coursework at Fletcher.  I met with my academic advisor, Prof. Shultz, very early in the semester, which set me on the right path for my course load, as he helped lay out a logical course progression.  Role of Force and Processes of International Negotiation were both mandatory courses in my Fields of Study — setting the stage for all my follow-on classes, and I wanted to knock out my ILO requirement early on with International Organizations.  I rounded the semester out with one regionally focused course, which balanced perfectly.  I found the semester to be an excellent mix of papers and final exams, which kept me from having a frantic end of the semester.

Semester Two

  • Policy and Strategy in War
  • Analytical Frameworks
  • Modern Terrorism and Counterterrorism
  • Peace Operations

Following what I had learned in the fall, I focused heavily on Security Studies this semester, although Peace Operations also counted towards my coursework in the INCR Field of Study.  I fulfilled my quantitative requirement with Analytical Frameworks, which taught me a lot of valuable skills.  Again, this semester was a good mix of papers and finals that enabled me to budget my time throughout the spring.  At this point I also started working with Professor Shultz on my capstone ideas so I could spend time over the summer doing research.

Summer
Army ROTC, MIT

The Army required that I be “gainfully employed” over the summer, so I spent my days helping out at MIT’s ROTC (Reserve Officers’ Training Corps) program.  The cadets were all gone at training for the summer, so I worked on information-sharing platforms for the unit to use in the fall, but also found myself with plenty of time to do baseline research on U.S. National Security Strategy, as well as where the Army fits in a changing environment, to help frame the “big picture” for my capstone.  I also had a fair amount of time over the summer to work on my Spanish skills on my own, as well as publish several military-related blog posts.

Semester Three

  • Internal Conflicts and War
  • Gender, Culture, and Conflict
  • Foundations of International Cybersecurity
  • Crisis Management and Complex Emergencies

This semester proved to be very challenging, as I had five group presentations with group papers due, but then had no finals.  Needless to say, the second half of the semester was a blur.  It was a very Security Studies heavy semester, but the gender course with Prof. Mazurana and Prof. Stites really stood out for me, and helped me understand an aspect of conflict that I’d never put much thought towards during my time in Iraq and Afghanistan.  Lastly, I used the Internal Conflicts class as the incubator for my thesis and was able to finish the majority of the Iraq portion of it.

Semester Four

  • The Strategic Dimensions of China’s Rise
  • Introduction to Economic Theory
  • The Historian’s Art and Current Affairs
  • Capstone Independent Study

I made the mistake of putting off my economics requirement until my final semester, so I had to use a class credit for it during the spring.  I decided to go with an Independent Study with Professor Shultz to finish my thesis and ensure I had the time necessary to put effort towards it.  I was a history major as an undergraduate, so Prof. Khan’s new class really interested me.  Last, with U.S. National Security Strategy “pivoting” to the Asia-Pacific, I wanted to get at least one course in that region into my coursework.

Tagged with:
 

Though my post is belated, I want to ensure recognition of Katerina Voutsina, who this winter was awarded an Overseas Press Club Foundation Scholar Award.  First, let’s let Katerina describe her path to Fletcher’s MALD program, which she concluded at the end of last semester.

Photo credit: Dallin Van Leuven

I came to Fletcher in January 2013 with the desire to delve deeper into European Union Affairs and economics.  Since 2010 and until my first day in the Hall of Flags, I was reporting on the social impact of the European financial crisis in Greece for the political newspaper TA NEA in Athens.  As a multimedia reporter and digital native, I learned to tell true stories with video, audio and interactives.  In 2011, I joined a three-person investigative team at the newspaper.  Our stories reached millions of readers on the newspaper’s print and online editions, and showed me the impact of quality journalism in my own country.  However, the complexity of the crisis — both economically and politically — reaffirmed my desire to return to graduate school.

My Fletcher journey was an intellectually stimulating experience: a mixture of challenges and joys.  Over the past two years, I have tailored my MALD degree to acquiring the analytical skills needed to understand policymaking in the EU, as well as the history and inherent politics of its institutions and neighbors.  My coursework in Macroeconomics, EU Political Economy, EU-US Relations, Islam and Politics, Religion and Conflict, Forced Migration, International Human Rights Law, and Analytic Frameworks in Public Policy have equipped me to identify impactful — but complex — stories, analyze the main players and explain the consequences to the reader.  I am grateful for my professors, whose passion for their field of work and mentorship encouraged me to work harder and delve deeper into the subjects of study; and I am thankful for the inspiring Fletcher friends I made here.  I am excited to be joining the Brussels bureau of The Wall Street Journal in May.  I believe that journalism is a form of public service and I look forward to writing on topics that would serve that purpose in the future.

And now the press release describing the award:

NEW YORK CITY, February 20, 2015:  Katerina Voutsina, a graduate student at the Fletcher School at Tufts University, was awarded an Overseas Press Club (OPC) Foundation Scholar Award at the Foundation’s 2015 Annual Scholar Awards Luncheon held at the Yale Club in New York City.  Acclaimed foreign correspondent, author and filmmaker Sebastian Junger was the keynote speaker.  Voutsina was among 15 aspiring foreign correspondents selected by a panel of leading journalists from a pool of 175 applicants from 50 different colleges and universities.  She is the first Tufts student in 25 years to win an OPC Foundation award.

Voutsina won the Standard & Poor’s Award for Economic and Business Reporting as well as an OPC Foundation fellowship in the Wall Street Journal bureau in Brussels.  In her winning essay she questioned whether Jean-Claude Junker is the right choice to lead the European Commission.  Voutsina received the award from Natalie Evertson, S&P Capital IQ.

The award winners were also honored with a reception at Reuters the night before the luncheon, hosted by Reuters’ editor-in-chief Stephen Adler.  On Saturday they received risk management and situational awareness training from Global Journalist Security at The Associated Press headquarters in New York City.  They also met privately with editors from BuzzFeed and The New York Times in a special breakfast held the morning of the awards presentation.

The OPC Foundation is the nation’s largest and most visible scholarship program encouraging aspiring journalists to pursue careers as foreign correspondents.  Media organizations at the luncheon included AP, Bloomberg, CBS News, GlobalPost/GroundTruth Project, IBT Media, Reuters, and The Wall Street Journal.

Katerina Voutsina_OPC_Award

Katerina addresses the audience as she accepted the Overseas Press Club Foundation award at the Yale Club in New York City.

Tagged with:
 

Spam prevention powered by Akismet