Yesterday’s storm really was something, but we’re all digging out today.  If you haven’t already checked your application status page, you’ll find that it probably has your admission decision (assuming your application was complete).  If you had deferred your enrollment from a previous term, or if you were admitted last fall (Early Notification), and if you applied for a scholarship, you’ll find award information there, too.

And today I want to offer my congratulations to everyone who was admitted!  We’re excited to start the next phase of our work — meeting you (in person or virtually) and taking your questions.  In the next five weeks, student-by-student, the Fall 2018 class will form and we know the Hall of Flags will be filled with talented and inspiring people in September.

Five weeks should be plenty of time to choose a graduate school, but it’s not necessarily more time than you’ll need.  Even if you have already decided to enroll at Fletcher, we suggest you use these weeks to collect useful details to guide your planning.  If you haven’t already selected a school, we hope you’ll make an informed decision — often we find that a lot of research goes into the selection of schools to apply to, but the more complex questions are raised only after admission decisions go out.  To that end, contact us, review the Fletcher website, and be sure to look at the student profiles, which will connect you with our community.  We’ll also be sharing tons of information with you during the next few weeks, aiming to surround you with Fletcher love.  Naturally, we hope you’ll decide to enroll here.

To those who were offered a place on the waitlist, we know that extra waiting is not what you want to do.  A little advance notice that, if you are offered admission down the road, you’ll have a very narrow window for making your decision.  Please be sure you’re ready, should the opportunity arise.

And, finally, if you were not offered admission, remember that you can request feedback after May 1.  We will offer you information that will help you understand the Admissions Committee’s decision.  Following the guidance we provide is often the pathway to a successful future application.

Even without yesterday’s storm, this would be a busy day.  The Fletcher Admissions email inbox was filling up quickly by yesterday afternoon.  As I said, we’re digging out — both from the snow and the email and phone messages.

 

March 13, the birthday of Austin Barclay Fletcher, and here we are, hunkered down during a major snowstorm.  The “nor’easter” swirling off the coast of the U.S. is due to leave us with at least a foot of spring snow, and Tufts University, along with nearly every other school or university in the area, is closed.

What does this mean for anxious applicants?  Nothing to worry about!  Following hours of intense work yesterday and continuing throughout today (not so much by me, I hasten to add — I don’t want to steal the thunder of my colleagues), admission decisions will be available by this evening for all MALD, MA, MIB, LLM, and PhD applications that are complete.  (That’s evening in U.S. East Coast terms.  UTC-4.)

When your decision is ready, you’ll receive an email to check your Application Status Page.  (Reminder for those who haven’t bookmarked the page:  To access your Application Status Page you can click the application link, or the “Start an Application” link on the Admissions website.  You’ll log in with the email and password you used when you created your application.)  If you haven’t already done so, read the posts from yesterday and Friday.  These will help you interpret the decision you receive.

Needless to say, with the office closed, there’s even less benefit than usual to phoning and asking for your decision today.  Just stay patient, like our little buddy Murray (who is keeping cozy during the storm), and the information will soon be available.

While we’re all waiting, let me add that reading applications and getting to know our applicants is one of the best parts of the yearly admissions cycle.  We read so many inspiring stories and learn so much.  Releasing decisions marks an end to the application review part of the year, but it starts a six-month phase of building more meaningful relationships with future students.  Wherever you will be in September 2018, please know that we appreciate your interest in The Fletcher School!

 

In Friday’s post, I provided the information that applicants who are not offered admission in this round can use to understand their decisions.  Today, as the staff creeps ever closer to being ready to release decisions, we’ll look at the different categories of admission.

Within the next week (and we’re really working as fast as we can), many Fletcher applicants will learn that they have been admitted for September 2018 enrollment.  Some of the offers of admission, however, will be accompanied by a condition.  The first thing to remember is that we don’t bother to admit someone conditionally unless we’re very enthusiastic about other aspects of the application; don’t let the condition diminish your sense of accomplishment!

What is the basis for a conditional offer of admission?  After reviewing a prospective student’s application, the Admissions Committee may suggest the applicant needs further preparation before enrolling at Fletcher.  We’ll make that preparation a condition of admission.  The most frequently employed conditions require that, before starting Fletcher classes, the student should improve:

  • English language proficiency
    We tend to be inflexible about the nature of the pre-Fletcher English training, for reasons I hope are obvious.  (In case they’re not as obvious as I think, I’ll spell it out:  No one can succeed in Fletcher classes with weak English skills.)
  • Foreign language proficiency
    There’s more flexibility around foreign language training for native English speakers.  We’ll ask students to choose the best program for their level and their choice of language — there are too many variables involved for us to dictate any particular option.
  • Quantitative skills (MIB program only)
    We will suggest several options for those who face this requirement.

The remaining (majority of) admitted applicants will have no condition attached to their admission. Nonetheless, we’ll encourage everyone to do an honest self-assessment and brush up any skills (English, foreign language, quantitative) that might need brushing before starting classes.  No condition on your admission doesn’t mean you shouldn’t work on any shortcomings.

For the last few years, some students admitted to the MALD program have also been asked to focus on their quantitative skills.  This year, instead, we are going to put a greater emphasis on advising all incoming students so that they make the right course choices for their quantitative requirements.  We’ve been thinking for a couple of months about what this might look like.  In any case, no quantitative conditions on admission to the MALD program.

Beyond the conditions, there’s one other noteworthy aspect to the admit category:  Occasionally, we admit applicants to a program other than the one to which they applied.  Most common example:  You applied to the mid-career MA program, but you don’t have sufficient professional experience to meet Fletcher’s standard for mid-career.  On the other hand, you look great for the MALD program, so we’ll admit you to the MALD!

Our process would certainly be simpler if there were only one type of admit, but the option to attach a condition to admission is the difference between admit and deny for some applicants.  We would hate to turn away a highly qualified applicant who needs a little brush-up on English skills, but we would be obliged to do so if we couldn’t require pre-Fletcher English study.

The happy bottom line is that conditional admission is (once the condition is met) ADMISSION!  And we’re convinced that fulfilling the condition will enhance the admitted student’s experience at Fletcher.  So we’ll maintain our portfolio of admits, sometimes with conditions attached.

 

 

While readers are paying attention, but before you all get too anxious, I want to help you understand the options that the Committee on Admissions selected from when making admissions decisions.

In general terms, as I’m sure you could have figured out, the decision choices range from admission to no admission, with the offer of a place on the waitlist somewhere in the middle.  I’m going to write about these latter two options today, and I’ll focus on admission options on Monday.  I do this annually, but we have actually made a few changes for this year.

THE BACKGROUND

As I know you are well aware, we will not be able to admit everyone who applied to Fletcher for September 2018 enrollment.  There are two possible outcomes for those who aren’t admitted now.  One is to deny admission and the other is to offer the applicant a place on the waitlist, possibly resulting in admission later in the spring/summer.

When we review applications, we’re looking for a combination of academic potential, professional and international experience, and clear academic and career goals.  Applicants who are not admitted, or who are offered a place on the waitlist, might be missing one or more of those elements, or they might be a little weak in all of them when compared to the qualifications of admitted students.

THE PARTICULARS

For those not admitted: We’re always sorry to say goodbye to an applicant.  We’ve read your story and we know how important gaining admission to graduate school is for you.  The fact is that many of the students not admitted this year could be admitted in a future year.  We hope you will continue to develop your experience and credentials, and that we may read about you again.

Some applicants will receive a letter saying that, though they look great overall, we want them to gain relevant professional experience, and it’s the work history that stands between them and the admission they hoped for.  We’ll only use this decision option for applicants within about a year of their university graduation.  We encourage them to work for a couple of years, although (depending on their internship record) it could take more or less time for them to build their professional experience and become competitive applicants.

For those offered a place on the waitlist: Each year, we offer a place on the waitlist to a promising group — applicants whose credentials are solid overall, and yet just a little less solid than those of the applicants we’ve admitted.  (A waitlist is what it sounds like — a list of people waiting for a place to open up in the entering class.)  In some years, we admit a significant number of students from the waitlist.  Occasionally, we don’t admit any.  But most years we admit a few.  This is true for each degree program, and each maintains its own waitlist.

It can be difficult for waitlisted applicants to get a handle on what this decision means for them.  Understandably so.  For starters, what matters is not how many waitlist offers we make, but rather how many people decide to accept a spot on the list, and we won’t have that number until the end of April.  We don’t rank our waitlist, and when it comes time to make an offer of admission, we go back to the applications and review our notes.  Applicants offered a place on the waitlist can take until April 20 to decide whether to wait.  Most of our work with the waitlist takes place in May or June, though we’ll keep a list into the summer.

MOST IMPORTANT 

Contact us!  Whether an applicant is denied admission or offered a place on the waitlist, our door is still open for communication, and we hope you will contact us.  Increasingly, the Admissions Committee expects to see a record of correspondence from those who are applying for the second time.

Students who are not offered admission have the opportunity to request feedback on their application.  If you’re planning to reapply, I encourage you to ask for feedback this spring.  (That is, don’t wait until the month before your next application — you will want time to make improvements.)  We’ll accept feedback requests on May 1 and you’ll hear back from us within a month or so of your request.

As for the waitlist, trust that we’re well aware that no one wants to wait.  But for some applicants, the waitlist will ultimately result in admission.  We encourage you to make the most of this opportunity by taking the time to give your application a boost.  For example, you may have experienced changes in your education or professional life, and we want to know about it.  If you have new test scores (GRE/GMAT or TOEFL/IELTS) or grades for classes, please send them to us.  If you have changed jobs or assumed new responsibilities at your current position, send us an updated résumé.  Now’s your chance to shine up your application before we return to it when we evaluate the waitlist.

Although applicants who have accepted a place on the waitlist still have applications under active consideration, and we won’t offer feedback at this time, we are happy to chat with you in person or by phone.  Get in touch, and ask us if there is a special piece of information we need.

Finally, Fletcher welcomes applicants to reapply.  Someone who applies unsuccessfully, smooths up some of the rough points in the application, and reapplies in a subsequent year, has shown determination and a strong interest in the School — two qualities we love in our applicants.

On Monday, I’ll run through the different categories of admission.

 

In an annual personal trial, I have collected information on a month’s events, as many as I could track down, knowing that still other opportunities may have passed students’ way.  I did a pretty comprehensive round-up for February 2017 and for March 2016.  Having decided to do the same this year, I recalled that compiling the previous years’ lists was a surprising amount of work, and all month I chided myself for not working on the 2018 edition bit-by-bit.  I ultimately sat down last week to a mess of email notices that finally defeated me.  Rather than abandon the idea, I thought I would narrow the scope to highlight a few features of February’s events.  (You’ll note that it’s already March — clearly I have not achieved my goals on this one.)

Fletcher students often say that there is more going on here than they can possibly take advantage of.  In that regard, let me first point you to one of the busiest lunch hours of the month.  On Monday and Wednesday, there are no classes from 12:30 to 1:30, which can result in a tantalizing array of choices.  For Monday, February 26, these were the options:

The IBGC (International Business in the Global Context) Speaker Series hosted lunch and a talk entitled, “Disruption or Innovation: How Global Banks are Positioning for the Future,” by Mariya Rosberg, F04, partner at Oliver Wyman.

The International Security Studies Program and the Center for Strategic Studies presented a lunch lecture by Major John Spencer, Deputy Director of the Modern War Institute and Co-Director of the Urban Warfare Project, who spoke on, “If warfare has moved into cities, why is the military not preparing?”

The Fletcher Initiative on Religion, Law and Diplomacy and the Fares Center presented lunch and discussion with Dr. Aykan Erdemir, Senior Fellow at the Foundation for Defense of Democracies and former member of the Turkish Parliament (2011-2015).  He spoke on “Bridging the Bonded: Faith, Politics, and Diplomacy in a Polarized Age.”

The Russia and Eurasia Program invited the community to lunch and a roundtable discussion on Russian public diplomacy with another alumnus, Alex Dolinskiy, F09, one of the pioneers in developing the concept of public diplomacy in Russia.

And, finally, the Center for International Environment and Resource Policy hosted lunch and a research discussion with Rich Swanson, who spoke on “Energy for Africa, Prioritizing Investments Under Climate Change.

I suppose that lunch was the reward for making the choice of which event to attend.

The second aspect of the busy month that I’ll highlight is the range of student-organized activities.  Starting on the 8th with a Tech@Fletcher happy hour (“Come to chat intersection of tech and [insert any topic here]… or for the free apps!”) we then returned the following Monday to “Random Acts of Kindness” week.

February must inspire creativity, because on the 14th, the Japan Club organized an Origami Workshop, along with Japanese snacks.

And creative expressions were not limited to crafts.  On the 15th, students presented, “A Memory, A Monologue, A Rant and a Prayer; Writings to End Violence Against Women & Girls,” an anthology featuring monologues from several authors and playwrights that explore violence on all levels.

For those who prefer sports to the arts, there were two Fletcher Futbol games, on the 16th and the 25th.

And returning to more traditional offerings, on the 16th, the International Law Society presented a Student Law Panel, featuring Fletcher students.

There were plenty of other student-organized events, but I’ll close out the post by pointing you toward the Fletcher calendar.  Not every event is included, but poke around and you’ll get a sense of the scope of conferences, lectures, club meetings, and luncheons that take place each month.

 

Yep, we know, applicants are getting anxious: When will decisions be released?  It’s time for an update, which will fall short of a prediction.

Nearly all completed applications have been read, reviewed, and given a preliminary decision.  That’s true for all degree programs and pretty much the only cases still kicking around are those that arrived for our March 1 deadline.  At this time, we’re working on the last details and finalizing decisions, as well as reviewing scholarship applications and making awards.  There’s also plenty of behind-the-scenes work going on — checking and rechecking our letters and emails.

So when will decisions be released?  I still can’t say.  I can tell you for sure that it will be no later than March 20.  As we complete each day’s work, it becomes clearer how much longer we’ll need.  For now, it’s still murky.  The update, I suppose, is simply that we’re in the final stages, but these last steps always take time.  More information to follow in the coming days.

 

Mariya is one of the busiest students I know, which makes me lucky that she continues to write for the Admissions Blog.  And not only is she busy, but she’s busy in varied international locations.  Today we’ll read about her fall and winter travels.

Hello readers, and belated Happy New Year!  My fall semester ended with reflections, and this semester, too, begins with reflections.  As I think about all the opportunities I have had at Fletcher, I cannot help but be grateful for so many unique experiences.  To give you a sense of the types of opportunities Fletcher students can pursue during their time here, I would like to highlight two international experiences that have broadened my academic horizons.

Presenting a paper in London

In November, I presented my paper titled “Religious Roots of American Democracy” at the “Democracy and Rule of Law” conference at the University of Westminster in London.  My paper explores the role of religion in the founding and shaping of American democracy and politics.  There were about 15 other scholars of different ages who traveled from all over the world (India, Turkey, Serbia, Italy, Canada, Poland, to name a few) to meet in this intellectual forum, share their research, and solicit feedback.  I was impressed by the diversity of topics presented at the conference.  A German scholar, for example, gave a presentation about heavy metal screaming as a form of cultural resistance and freedom of expression.  A practicing lawyer talked about the principle of legality in the EU’s economic crisis management as it related to Greece’s recession.  And a research fellow shared his paper on whether an Italian law was capable of guaranteeing the rights of beggars against the will of the majority.  I was the only American in the group and my presentation on religion in democracy drew numerous questions.

Although intended mainly for the scholars who would later refine their papers for journal publication by the Center for the Study of International Peace and Security, which hosted the conference, the event was open to the public.  In fact, I met a couple from France who approached me afterward to say they enjoyed my presentation and we engaged in a lengthy dialogue contrasting our countries’ religious freedom laws.  My time in London was very short — literally two full days — but it was nice to connect with my Fletcher scholarship donor, Kate Hedges, who kindly showed me pockets of the city a tour bus would have skipped.  I squeezed in a few touristy excursions before catching a flight back.

While my paper will not be published until April, check out my op-ed published in the Kennedy School Review about the role of religion in the public eye.

Learning Middle Eastern politics in Beirut

In January, after completing a half-credit “J-term” (January course) on lobbying at the Harvard Kennedy School, I flew to Lebanon for the weeklong Beirut Exchange Program.  Nadim Shehadi, director of the Fares Center for Eastern Mediterranean Studies, encouraged me to apply to this opportunity, given my regional interests in Middle Eastern politics.  A group of 12 professionals from around the world engaged with politicians, journalists, and civil society activists to get an in-depth picture of Lebanese politics.  With the upcoming election in May and the changed electoral law, politicians and Lebanese citizens alike wait with anticipation the unfolding future of their country.  It was fascinating to hear different perspectives on sectarian political representation, Palestinian and Syrian refugee crises, and Lebanon’s 2006 war as it relates to regional geopolitics.

The agenda was jam-packed with lectures, workshops, and a day trip to Tripoli, an hour north of the capital.  There was little time for tourism, but a group of us took advantage of our evenings to explore the downtown nightlife, admire the close proximity of mosques and churches, and indulge in delicious Lebanese cuisine.  I fell in love with the creamy hummus, fresh tabbouleh and perfectly seasoned moutabbal (also known as baba ganoush, an eggplant dip mixed with tahini).  And as always happens on all my international trips, I met a Fletcher alum in the program!  A middle-aged media commentator from Pakistan studied under the same capstone advisor as me: Professor Richard Shultz.

Both of these international experiences were incredible, and would not have been possible without generous support from the Fletcher Educational Enrichment Fund, the Graduate Travel Support Program of the Provost’s Office, the Dean’s Fund, and various campus institutes.  I feel incredibly grateful and blessed to be at a place like Fletcher where students are supported in the opportunities that knock their doors.

Tagged with:
 

One day last week I was toiling away in my office when I was told that Courtney was asking to see me.  I assumed it was a current student, so I was surprised (and delighted) to find, instead, Courtney Fung, F12, a PhD graduate who is now a professor at the University of Hong Kong, and was spending a day on campus.  Courtney and I go way back to her application days.  Then she spent a year on the Admissions Committee.  One way or another, I feel like we were in regular contact throughout her years at Fletcher.  The last time she visited, she left an umbrella in my office, and I’ve kept it for her (while, admittedly, also using it on occasion if I forgot to bring one).  It always makes me think of Courtney, and though I encouraged her to take it with her last week, she didn’t.  I’ll offer it to her again the next time she visits.  Until then it serves as a nice reminder.

The students in the PhD program are very special members of the community.  Not only do they bring academic strength and the tenacity needed to complete a dissertation, they also have significant professional experience.  The communications office has been interviewing students periodically and these are the profiles that have been written so far.

Phoebe Donnelly
Sarah Detzner
Ana de Alba
Deborshi Barat
Zoltan Feher
Polina Beliakova

Self-profiles of more students are available on our website.

Also last week, I received a link to a podcast that a recent PhD graduate had recorded as a guest.  On the podcast, Michael Sullivan, who just defended his dissertation in September, discusses leadership, resiliency, and the charity event he organized, “Shootout for Soldiers.”  He talks about his experience at Fletcher at about the 40-minute mark of the interview.  It’s a good listen in general, but particularly for anyone curious about the U.S. military officers who step away from the day-to-day of their careers to pursue a degree at Fletcher.

Tagged with:
 

Today I’d like to share the second installment of Faculty Facts.  As I put together these summaries of research and professional activities, I’ll continue to try to show the breadth of professors’ interests by profiling representatives of various fields in each post.  In a professional school with a multidisciplinary curriculum, the range of activities is especially broad.  In case you missed it, the first Faculty Facts post appeared last week.

Tom Dannenbaum, Assistant Professor of International Law

I have recently completed a book on the criminalization of aggression, which will come out in the next few months.  The book argues that the revival of the crime has more significant implications for soldiers on either side of such wars than has thus far been appreciated.  It builds on a recent article, Why Have We Criminalized Aggressive War?, which provides an account of the criminal wrongfulness of aggression, and which was awarded the Lieber Prize by the American Society of International Law.  Moving forward, I am working on several projects, including a piece on the legitimacy of the International Criminal Court, a piece on the law and ethics of medical care in armed conflict, and a theory of war crimes.

Professor Dannenbaum’s profile.

Monica Duffy Toft, Professor of International Politics

I continue to research the role of religion in global politics and the onset of large-scale violence.  I am finishing a book on demography and national security and beginning a major project on U.S. military interventions.

Professor Toft’s profile.  The website for the Center for Strategic Studies, which Professor Toft directs.

Ayesha Jalal, Mary Richardson Professor of History at Tufts University

I am working on a new project tentatively entitled “Islamic Universalism, Liberalism and the Age of Empire” that probes Muslim responses to liberal values and thought projected by Western empires, most notably the British in India as well as in West and South East Asia. This builds on my most recent research and writing examining the inter-connectivities, and especially the intellectual, cultural and political exchanges, between the Indus-Gangetic plain and the wide world of Islam on the Indian Ocean Rim, which is being brought out as a jointly edited volume called Islam is the Ocean.

My purpose in conducting this inquiry is to assess the validity of the claim — initially made by Orientalist scholars, often linked with colonial administrations in different parts of Asia but which since has been accepted as something of an academic “orthodoxy” — that Muslims cannot be liberal in the true sense of the word because of the limitations imposed on their thinking by the imperatives of their faith.  In addition to subjecting the concept of liberalism to rigorous historical and intellectual scrutiny with a view to questioning its exclusively Western trajectory, I am in the process of tracing debates during the late 19th and early 20th centuries in which Muslims, operating at a transnational level, took the initiative of challenging Western writers and policymakers who portrayed the Faithful as averse to reform and progress.  In subsequent phases of the research, I will be looking at the impact of the post-WWII international system based on modern nation-states in molding conceptions of “liberal” thinking in the Muslim world during the Cold War and the post-Cold War periods.  In sum, this project addresses many of the key issues discussed in the contemporary debate on Muslims and liberalism by offering an analytically focused, sharply critical and historically grounded perspective.

Professor Jalal’s profile.  She previously wrote a Faculty Spotlight post.

John Shattuck, Professor of Practice in Diplomacy

I am on leave from Fletcher this semester and I’m serving as a Visiting Scholar at the Institute of International Studies, University of California, Berkeley, where I am engaged in a comparative research and writing project on illiberal governance and democratic resilience in the U.S. and Europe.  My research on democratic resilience in the U.S. will be issued this spring as a report by the Carr Center for Human Rights Policy, where I am a Senior Fellow.  I delivered the keynote address, “The Crisis of Democracy in the U.S. and Europe,” at the Genron Institute international conference on challenges to democracy in Tokyo in November; and will be a keynote speaker this spring at conferences at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, Georgetown University, Harvard Law School, and Brandeis University.  I chair the international advisory board of the Center on Ethics, Justice and Public Life at Brandeis University.

I’ve recently published two research papers, and a third is forthcoming.

How Resilient is Liberal Democracy in the US?,” published by the Carr Center for Human Rights Policy, Harvard Kennedy School, February 15, 2018
Democracy and Illiberal Governance,” The American Prospect, August 29, 2017
“Will Democracy in America Survive Donald Trump?,” forthcoming from The American Prospect, March/April 2018

Professor Shattuck’s profile.

Tagged with:
 

Today we’ll turn back to the Class of 2012, and to a friend of the Admissions Office.  Kartik was a member of the Admissions Office staff for both of his two years in the MALD program.  I remember taking him along for a grad school fair in Boston.  It has been a treat to have an excuse to reconnect with him.

My path to Fletcher was fairly convoluted.  My first job out of college was in the Boston area at an economic policy consulting firm.  The job was mainly focused on economic issues around infrastructure development in the U.S.  As a kid I️ grew up in a few different countries and I️ really wanted work that would let me travel internationally as much as possible.  For the longest time I️ thought that would mean getting an MBA and finding a job as a management consultant or the like.  That was until a friend told me about International Relations as a degree and, after doing some research, I️ found out about Fletcher.

During Fletcher:

I had developed a quantitative background during college and my job.  When I started at Fletcher, I found that taking theoretical and qualitative classes on subjects I️ had never studied before was a lot harder than I️ had initially anticipated.  However the experience was definitely made easier by the professors and my fellow Fletcher students, who were a lot of help during that time.  I️ was lucky enough to get into Professor Everett’s petroleum class in my first semester, which I️ have to say was a definite life-changer for me.  I️ had known that I️ wanted to go into the field of energy post-Fletcher, but I️ wasn’t sure doing what/where — that class definitely helped make that decision for me.

My experience in the petroleum class solidified my belief that international energy was a space rife with interesting issues and it would be an interesting path to follow as a career.  What I️ learned in that class and others in the environmental concentration is content and skills that I️ still use to this day.  In hindsight, I️ also have to say that the classes I️ took outside of the environmental stream, like Professor Trachtman’s law class, were also very helpful.

As an aside, I️ want to point out that my extracurricular activities at Fletcher included hosting Fletcher Follies, and the experience of making light of often serious issues showed me a side of Fletcher that I️ hadn’t previously experienced.  I️t was a transformational and extremely fun experience.

After Fletcher:

Between my two years at Fletcher, I️ interned at a small consulting firm in Washington, DC that specialized in political risk and energy.  Then, after graduating, I got a job with a few colleagues from that firm who left to start their own practice in New York.

As a member of a small team, right out of grad school, I️ had significant responsibility for what I️ was working on.  This involved a lot of client sales and conferences along with actual research and presentations.  We were dealing with global energy issues where I️ got to travel to a number of very interesting places and deal with some extremely interesting problems.  These spanned the spectrum from corruption issues in Brazil to the opening up of the Iranian oil sector.

In 2015, after three years in that job, I got an opportunity to expand my energy work and go into the field of equity research for the energy sector at Bernstein, where I️ am presently.  Today I️ work on stock pricing in the energy sector — my team is responsible for setting a price for energy stocks that many investors trade off of.  In addition, about half my time is spent answering investor questions about various global and local issues that could potentially affect commodity and stock prices.  These topics can span anything that might directly or indirectly cause changes in the energy markets, which makes the job both very interesting and challenging.  I️ need to talk about what is happening with scud missiles falling in Saudi Arabia in the same conversation as the EPA’s clean air rules.  Many of these topics remain those about which I️ learned to form opinions in my classes at Fletcher.

The one thing that I️ do regret to this day is not taking the corporate finance classes with Professor Jacque.  Being in a finance job was not something that I️ had ever wanted or worked towards, but it definitely took me longer to learn the ropes because I️ didn’t have a background in finance.  In hindsight, I️ think the corporate finance classes would have been very helpful and I️ would recommend them highly to anyone who is still at Fletcher.  You never know when you might need them!

I️ have kept in touch with quite a few Fletcher friends who have been invaluable in both my professional and personal growth and being in New York has given me a real appreciation of Fletcher connections.  I️t is also incredible how many Fletcher graduates I️ have run into in countries around the world, whether I️ am visiting for fun or for work.

Tagged with:
 

Spam prevention powered by Akismet